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Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Will redevelopment on a single block of Troost be the bellweather for how the city revitalizes other neighborhoods?

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: The Independent candidate discusses his race for Kansas governor. 

The fierce gubernatorial race between Republican Kris Kobach, Democrat Laura Kelly and Independent Greg Orman is heating up. Orman joined us in-studio to talk about his proposals for education, the economy and gun control. He also explained why he decided to run as an Independent in a two-party system, and if low polling numbers will lead him to drop out.

Segment 1: Art isn't just fun and games.

To some, art seems more like a hobby rather than ‘real work.’ But, for many artists, that’s far from the truth. We visit with a Kansas Citian about what they discovered after being an artist for a year.

Segment 2, beginning at 23:03: How World War I sparked a lasting friendship between the United States and Australia.

Jeanette Jones wearing headphones and seated at a microphone in the KCUR studio.
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: American Public Square panelists agree on securing firearms in the home and little else during conversation on ways to prevent children dying from gun violence. 

Amy Mayer / Harvest Public Media

Segment 1: Proposed work requirements for some public food assistance is ruffling feathers.

While senators and House members in Washington struggle to find the compromises that could turn this year's version of the farm bill into law, millions of stakeholders await a solution. Today, we got an update from Harvest Public Media on how the negotiations, and their eventual outcomes, could affect city- and country-dwellers across the Midwest.

Segment 1: A new documentary illustrates the tension between police and African-American communities.

Black and Blue is a new documentary by Kansas City native Solomon Bass. In it, he follows a former police officer named Donald Carter, who struggles with the question of being both black and a police officer. Solomon Bass joins us to talk about the story behind the documentary.

As the filmmaker's latest collaboration with Spike Lee becomes the must-see movie of the moment, we talk to Kevin Willmott about BlacKkKlansman, race in America, the purpose of satire, and his own life story, which begins in Junction City, Kansas. This hour-long interview is part of our Portrait Session series.

  • Kevin Willmott, filmmaker and KU professor of film and media studies

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Most people agree access to pre-K needs to be expanded. Not everyone agrees on how to pay for and oversee it.

Days after Kansas City Mayor Sly James made public the particulars of his plan to fund expanded early childhood education, opposition to the proposal is piping up. Today, we heard educators and community organizers explain why they think the mayor's scheme to get more 4-year-olds into pre-K needs work.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Twenty-five years after the "Great Flood of 1993," is Kansas City any safer?

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Former Kansas City mayor reflects on the impact of downtown development.

Much of the credit for Kansas City's current downtown boom can be placed at the feet of former Mayor Kay Barnes, whose efforts culminated in the creation of the Power and Light District and the construction of the Sprint Center. Nevertheless, parts of town east of Troost still struggle for invesment and redevelopment. We spoke with Barnes about her legacy and the community-building work that's left to be done.

Kansas Historical Society

As of Thursday, the Republican primary for Kansas governor was a long way from being decided.

Trevor Hook / KCUR 89.3

Brown and Loe is an upscale bistro in the heart of the River Market, with a large, open interior with checkered black-and-white floors. They carry high-dollar wines and cocktails, but something on the non-alcoholic side of the menu jumps out: their phosphates.

Before I was assigned to this story, I had absolutely no idea what a phosphate was. Josh Eaton, assistant general manager at Brown and Loe, explained it me.

Courtesy photo / Bruce Matthews

Elmwood Cemetery covers 43 acres shaded by centuries-old trees at the corner of Van Brunt Boulevard and Truman Road in Kansas City's Historic Northeast neighborhood. Anywhere from 35,000 to 38,000 people are buried there, including mayors, local pioneers and scions of Kansas City's business and civic communites.

Attercop311 / Wikimedia Commons

Segment 1: Kansas farmers hope to boost agricultural economy with new cash crop.

Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer in April signed off on a bill that included the Alternative Crop Research Act, which effectively allows the Kansas Department of Agriculture to oversee the cultivation of industrial hemp. Although hemp is famously difficult to maintain, both seasoned and novice Kansas farmers are eager to cash in on one of the most lucrative crops in American history.

Segment 1: Fred Rogers and his television show influenced generations of viewers.

Won't you be my neighbor? That's a lyric to the theme song of Mister Rogers' Neighborhood, a children's television program that spanned decades in the mid-1900's. On this episode, we learn the impact Fred Rogers had on the lives of children and educators across the country.

  • Angee Simmons, Vice President of Education and Engagement, KCPT

Segment 2, beginning at 36:36: History of women's activism in Kansas City. 

Segment 1: Besides being a fad, tiny houses can also help in the instance of a natural disaster.

Often the talk surrounding "tiny houses" is focused on cutting costs but their design can also help aid housing crises after a natural disaster.

A black and white aerial photo from 1945. It shows a swimming pool filled with people and a parking lot filled with cars.
Missouri Valley Special Collections

When the director of Open Spaces, the upcoming city-wide arts festival, came to Kansas City to explore the selected hub location, all he saw was something “spectacular”: A large piece of land that lived up to its designation as the “crown jewel” of Kansas City’s park system.

Kevin Collison

Construction is expected to begin soon on the $68 million West Bottoms Flats apartment development, the first major renovation project in the downtown warehouse district that fueled Kansas City’s economic growth in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Warren K. Leffler / United States Library of Congress

Segment 1: Kansas City, Kansas, Public Safety and Neighborhood Infrastructure Sales Tax up for renewal.

A three-eighth-cent sales tax that passed with 70 percent of the vote in 2010 has collected more than $50 million devoted to public safety and neighborhood projects in Wyandotte County. This August, voters there get to decide if the sales tax has been worth the money. The levy is set to expire in 2020 unless it is approved for renewal. Today, we discussed the projects that the tax has benefitted and if it's still the best option for the Unified Government.

Kansas Historical Society

Segment 1: Former Kansas Democratic governor on the approaching midterm elections.

In 1979 John Carlin began the first of two terms as Kansas governor. He went on to work as the Eighth Archivist of  the United States by appointment of President Bill Clinton. Today, as a Kansas State University professor and leading figure in local civic engagement, he's still heavily involved in state and the state of politics. We got his take on the race for his former office.

Segment 1: History of deaf discrimination in the United States.

Members of the hearing-impaired community oft face unique challenges when living in America. We discuss the history of persecution against people with deafness in the United States as well as milestones alongside the path to equal rights. Also, meet the local instructor who teaches deaf refugees their first language: American Sign Language.

Missouri State Capitol Commission, Missouri State Archives

The Lake of the Ozarks is one of Missouri's most popular weekend getaways, which is what inspired Dan William Peek and Kent Van Landuyt to publish A People's History of the Lake of the Ozarks a couple of years ago.

The two authors say they hope that all visitors, true locals, newcomers or just weekend vacationers take the time to appreciate the lake not only for the amenities it offers today, but also for the nearly forgotten history that lies beneath the water.

The Stories And Ethics Of DNA Testing

Jul 3, 2018

For some, genetic testing can provide answers to lifelong questions. But DNA also raises unique ethical conundrums when it comes to privacy and discrimination. On this episode, we dive into the personal stories and moral curiosities about DNA.

Guests:

Portraits of George and Martha Washington as they appeared on a early 20th century postcard.
Boston Public Library

Segment 1: Kansas Supreme Court rules new school funding plan lacks sufficient money but gives legislature another year to eliminate shortfall.

In order to avoid school shutdowns, the Kansas Legislature recently added $522 million to the education budget over the next five years. Still, critics argue this will not be enough and more needs to be added for inflation. Today, we looked at this latest development in the longstanding Gannon case and its implications for the future of public education in the state.

Segment 1: A team of linguists discover a new accent in southwest Kansas. 

Liberal, Kansas, and other nearby communities are developing a distinct accent. We find out how the language change is a sign of a vibrant and growing Latino pouplation. 

Segment 2, beginning at 18:35: The lesser known history of the Ozark region.

LaBudde Special Collections, Miller Nichols Library

Who in Kansas City remembers AIDS activists smashing vials of HIV-positive blood in City Hall, and abortion opponents trying to display fetuses in coffins at Planned Parenthood protests?

It was 25 years ago, so you’d have to be a certain age to remember. And you’d need to have been paying attention to the news.

Kansas City Business Journal

Kansas City's long-vacant Luzier Cosmetics Building may soon have a new tenant: The Nelle, an urban social club for women.

Although a lease hasn't yet been signed, Nelle co-founder Sierra Miramontez said she and her business partner, Lauren Saks, have been in talks with the building's owner and developer Butch Rigby since last year. They plan to occupy about 15,000 square feet inside 3216 Gillham Plaza and open in the fall or early 2019.

Peter Borsari / Kansas City Business Journal

A nondescript building in the Kansas City area is home to something that many in the art world can't believe exists in a Midwest city, according to the man tasked with selling it, according to the Kansas City Business Journal.

Original 18th-century engravings by William Hogarth. Photos by pioneering photographer Weegee. Millions of photographs, plates, line drawings and ephemera, such as posters, broadsides and tickets. And it's all on the market at the fire-sale price of $15 million.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1:  The certified public accountant and former businessman explains why he's fit for the governor's office.

As a fourth-generation Kansan and the current state insurance commissioner, Republican Ken Selzer believes he has the experience to succeed as governor. Today he discussed his approach to taxes, the Second Amendment and the changes he'd make to clean up politics in Topeka.

Danny Wood / KCUR 89.3

Decades after most of the buildings were dismantled, newspaper articles raved about the beautiful vistas from a hilltop in Clay County: “One of the finest views of Missouri River countryside in all directions that may be found,” the Kansas City Journal wrote in 1941.

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