Nobel Prize | KCUR

Nobel Prize

Bram Sable-Smith

Editor's note: Until recently, Bram Sable-Smith was a health reporter at KCUR's sister station KBIA in Columbia, Missouri. His father, George P. Smith, was awarded the Nobel Prize in Chemistry on Wednesday for developing a laboratory technique known as phage display, in which a virus that infects bacteria can be used to evolve new proteins.

Bram spoke with his father for KCUR.

Sable-Smith: When did it sink in that you had won the Nobel Prize?

The University of Missouri has its first ever Nobel Prize.

Professor Emeritus George Smith shares the 2018 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with two other researchers, one from Caltech in Pasadena, and the other from the MRC Laboratory in Cambridge. Smith was a professor at MU for 40 years. He won the Nobel for his development of a method called phage display, in which a virus that infects bacteria can be used to evolve new proteins.

Black and white photo of Gilda Radner writing in a notebook.
Magnolia Pictures

One woman forges a path for female comics, a widow starts anew by opening her own business and one daughter goes to trial for killing her family. No matter the situation, strong women have found their place on screen this weekend recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics. Celebrate the weekend by being cinematically reminded of all that women can accomplish.

Steve Walker

"Love, Gilda," not rated

file photo / Kansas News Service

Kansas Gov. Jeff Colyer says President Donald Trump deserves the Nobel Peace Prize.

Joining six other Republican governors, Colyer signed a letter this week that said the president should get the honor for “his transformative efforts to bring peace to the Korean peninsula.”

The letter, dated Monday, was sent to the Norwegian Nobel Committee. The same panel gave Barack Obama the peace prize just nine months into his presidency in 2009 for what it saw as his contribution to international diplomacy.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

One Missouri photographer has spent years collecting stories and making images of musicians and their most prized possession; their guitars. Today, Chuck Holley shares some of his favorites. Then, we visit with Nobel Prize-winning economist Robert Shiller about the possibility of an upcoming bubble. Shiller says many harbingers of recessions in the past are present, but something important is missing.

For Randy Schekman, it all began with a toy microscope and pond scum. Now he’s a recipient of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his role in figuring out the science now used to produce one-third of the insulin used worldwide by diabetics, and the entire world’s supply of the Hepatitis B vaccine.

The two scientists who won this year's Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine discovered that cells in our body have the remarkable ability to reinvent themselves. They found that every cell in the human body, from our skin and bones to our heart and brain, can be coaxed into forming any other cell.