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social media

The Harbinger / YouTube

When Christopher Justice got a text message from a friend earlier this summer, he didn't know what it meant: "You're Twitter famous."

Justice had just graduated from Shawnee Mission East High School, and he was spending an uneventful few months working at a pizza place before heading off to college at Wichita State University. He didn't even have a Twitter account.

Herb Hardwick, the chairman of the Central City Economic Development Tax Board in business attire seated before a microphone in the KCUR studio.
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: How and when will Kansas City use funds from Central City Economic Development Sales Tax?

Stilwell, Kansas, is an unlikely place to find a Muslim Quran reciter who has over a million followers each on both Instagram and Facebook.

But for now, that's where you can find Fatih Seferagic.

When Seferagic was just four years old, his family fled war-torn Bosnia. He eventually ended up in Houston, Texas, when he was 14 years old and that’s when he gained a following after putting his Quran recitations up on YouTube.

Alex Nivens

Stephonne Singleton has been making music for as long as he can remember, and it’s all been building up to this moment.

He’s on the verge of releasing his first solo album.

“I’m so excited!” Singleton says. “I’ve never worked harder on anything in my entire life. It’s my heart. And I get to finally share that.”

He describes his music as a marriage of Prince and Billie Holiday, and it’s got elements of grunge and folk.

Social Good Week / Flickr - CC

Segment 1: How hyper-connectivity and technology have democratized power.

Our world has changed a lot in the 21st century. New technologies like Twitter and KickStarter have enabled worldwide social movements. But how does this new power work?  One activist described the ways public influence is shifting, and what it might mean for our future.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: How has our relationship with social media has changed over time?

In light of a report that data was harvested from 50 million unknowing Facebook users, many are rethinking their relationships with social media. Today, we explored the changing public perception of online social networks.

Paul Andrews / http://paulandrewsphotography.com/

A little over a year ago, Sunayana Dumala’s husband, Srinivas Kuchibhotla, was shot and killed at an Olathe bar by a man who questioned whether he was in the country legally.

Back then, Dumala wondered whether she should stay in the United States. In a Facebook post, she wrote: “To answer the question that is in every immigrant’s mind, DO WE BELONG HERE? Is this the same country we dreamed of and is it still secure to raise our families and children here?”

Public Domain / Pixabay-CC

Perfectionism, bullying, depression and social media are a few of the stressors teens constantly face in today's society. As the number of teen suicides in Kansas City reach record levels, we speak with school councilors and health experts to learn why rates are climbing in the metro and how to help prevent suicides.

But first, a discussion on undeveloped land in suburban areas. What happens when the desire to turn unused land into roads and schools collides with the desire to keep things natural?

Guests:

Pete Souza / The White House

When Kansas City native Josh Earnest first moved to Washington he wasn't necessarily after a job in the White House, but that's where he ended up. Today, we find out how the former press secretary handled the daily barrage of questions from journalists, while maintaining the president's confidence and his own credibility. Then, we hear experiences of sexual harassment from metro listeners, and find out how they're responding to the #MeToo hashtag campaign.

On September 15 in St. Louis, a former police officer was acquitted in the shooting death of Anthony Lamar Smith. We check on the protests on the other side of the state. Plus, how the MeToo campaign is affecting Kansas Citians.

Guests:

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

For people on fixed incomes, being priced out of house and home by redevelopment and rising property values is a real concern. Today, we learn how developers can maintain affordable housing levels while improving neighborhoods and avoiding gentrification.

Initially, blogs were personal online journals; by the mid-2000s, they went mainstream. What has happened to blogging since then? Especially now that all those other feeds started filling our spare moments and our minds?

Then: how climate change may be affecting the nutrition content of our food.

Guests:

Missouri Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal and Rep. Warren Love made news last month doing something that seems antithetical to their positions in government; hoping in Facebook posts for political violence.

Updated August 31 at 4 p.m. with comments from Love and Gov. Greitens:

Republican Gov. Eric Greitens and Democratic elected officials are calling for a Republican lawmaker from southwest Missouri to step down after he posted on Facebook that people who defaced a Confederate statue should be “hung from a tall tree with a long rope.”

Rep. Warren Love's GOP legislative colleagues are also condemning the Osceola Republican after he posted his reaction to the news that someone threw paint on a Confederate memorial at the Springfield National Cemetery. He wrote: “This is totally against the law. I hope they are found & hung from a tall tree with a long rope.”

Pixabay - CC

Tensions over the Jackson County jail continue to mount. Attorneys for former inmates filed a class-action lawsuit last week that would force authorities to address the detention center's dangerous, dirty conditions. Today, we speak with two Jackson County legislators about what they'd do to improve the facility. Then, we kick off a week full of conversation with presenters from this year's TEDxKC.

Wikimedia Commons

Earlier this year, Karen Fuller, a former news anchor at KCTV-5, sued the station's owner, alleging the company created an age-ceiling for female anchors. Today, our Media Critics ask: Why is it common to have older newsmen on television but rare to see women anchors of a similar age?

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

From the mainstreaming of social media to "fake news" indictments from the chief executive, the journalism industry is in the midst of sweeping transformation. Today, the dean of the Missouri School of Journalism explains how his school teaches new reporters to adapt to the current and future media environments.

Maybe you're a new parent who's seeking some advice as you're feeding your baby in the middle of the night. Or perhaps you're looking to connect with others who share your political view. A look at the role — both positive and negative — of online communities and how they impact our lives.

Guests:

Courtesy of Netflix

KCUR’s Peggy Lowe reported on the Maryville Rape Case in 2013 and has this analysis of a new documentary on the story, which premieres on Sunday on Netflix.

The good news about “Audrie & Daisy,” a new documentary focusing on Daisy Coleman, the girl at the center of the Maryville rape case, is that it documents how Coleman survived and found her tribe.

A lot of people think social media is cutting into how well we interact with each other in real life. A local researcher says that may not be the case.

Guest:

The TV series Star Trek went where no one had gone before, both in its day and in the reality it created. Now, we Earthlings are using instruments and processes originally imagined by the creator and writers of the series, while our struggles with the issues of race and ideology it addressed in the 1960s continue.

Guest:

We live in a world filled with options. We’re constantly being asked to “like” or “dislike,” but what are we missing out on when everything is being catered to our preferences?

Guests:

Gaining prominence first as Lieutenant Sulu on Star Trek, George Takei's fame has spread off the stage, too. On this edition of Up To Date, Takei talks about his work advocating for social justice and how he maintains such a deft social media presence.

George Takei will appear at Planet Comicon Kansas City at Bartle Hall on May 21 and 22. For more information, or to buy passes, visit the Planet Comicon website.

Social media can be a place where middle schoolers feel like they can develop relationships. But the dangers of sharing information on the Internet can be frightening. We talk about navigating a complicated online world. 

Guest:

  • Dr. Wes Crenshaw is board certified in couples and family psychology. He writes the Double Take column for the Lawrence Journal World.

Kansas Citians Share Health Care Horror Stories

Jan 7, 2016
Artur Bergman / Flickr -- CC

 

A broken jaw during gall bladder surgery. Waiting 95 minutes for a doctor’s appointment. Being hit by a nurse.

When we asked, “What was your worst experience with health care in Kansas City?” you didn’t hold back.

Complaints ranged from access to health care to interactions with health professionals and facilities gone wrong.

Last month, a Facebook comment published by a member of Kansas Governor Brownback's administration stirred controversy among people offended by her post. When it comes to public issues, should government officials post their personal opinions on social media? The Ethics Professors tackle that, as well as what moral responsibilities adult children have as parents near the end of their lives.

Guests:

Last November, a University of Kansas student was expelled for posting derogatory tweets about his ex-girlfriend and fellow KU student. The case went to the Kansas Court of Appeals which last week handed down its ruling, finding for that student and ordering his reinstatement.

Guests:

Should universities police student behavior on social media? Recently, a KU student was expelled for comments he made about an ex-girlfriend on Twitter. A reporter and a student discuss the case and whether social media is part of a school's learning environment.

Steve Kraske / KCUR

When facial plastic surgeon Dr. David Kriet sits down to do a consultation with a patient in his Kansas City office, it isn’t unusual for his patient to show him a selfie.

Five years ago, the selfie would have been out of place, even foreign, in a doctor's office.

Selfie Surgeries

Jul 21, 2015

Health professionals have seen a rise in requests for cosmetic procedures because patients don't like how they look in selfies. On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske discusses the reasons and implications of these procedures.

Guests:

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