Teenagers | KCUR

Teenagers

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

For years, teenagers in Kansas City, Kansas, who have committed a crime served their time in the adult detention center in Wyandotte County, putting the county jail near or over capacity every day.

But the Unified Government of Wyandotte County and Kansas City, Kansas, has invested time and money toward a building for the teens, which is being built behind the juvenile court building. County officials hope to see the project completed by 2020. 

Macmillan Children's Publishing Group

In the new young adult novel “A Blade So Black,” the main character, Alice, doesn't have long blonde hair, and the other side of the looking glass isn't a place full of innocently quirky tea parties.

Latrice "Elle" McKinney, a Kansas resident who writes under the name L. L. McKinney, has created a  fantasy world full of adventure and imagination but infused with real-world issues and black girl magic.

Adib Khorram

Jul 26, 2018

Kansas City author Adib Khorram talks about his new buzz-generating novel for young adults, Darius The Great Is Not Okay. It turns out, Khorram has a lot in common with his teenage protagonist, from growing up half-Iranian in the United States to navigating life with depression to being obsessed with Star Trek and hot tea.

  • Adib Khorram, author, Darius The Great Is Not Okay

Herb Hardwick, the chairman of the Central City Economic Development Tax Board in business attire seated before a microphone in the KCUR studio.
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: How and when will Kansas City use funds from Central City Economic Development Sales Tax?

KCUR

Kansas City’s summer curfew for minors begins Friday evening and will remain in effect until September.

The summer curfew, enforced nightly from Memorial Day weekend until the last Sunday in September, requires anyone under 18 years old to be accompanied by a parent after 9 p.m. in five of Kansas City’s entertainment districts: the Country Club Plaza, Westport, Downtown, 18th and Vine and Zona Rosa.

Outside of these areas, the curfew is 10 p.m. for people 15 and under and 11 p.m. for teens aged 16 and 17.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

  Segment 1: Missouri State Auditor on what she counts as legislative victories in this year's regular session.

This past legislative session, Missouri lawmakers passed a law that strengthens protections for so-called "whistleblowers." Today, the Missouri state auditor told us why she pushed for this legislation, and what the implications are for state workers. We also learned why Gov. Eric Greitens' move to use taxpayer dollars to pay for private attorneys has her concerned.  

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Local 15-year-old creates a space for teens and young adults to embrace their love of books.

Book festivals for adults are a dime a dozen. Now, a teenager from Prairie Village is looking to give young readers a chance to geek out over their favorite past-time, too. We met the organizer, and spoke with two writers who are taking part this weekend in the first ever LitUp Festival.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

"Not enough teenagers are reading."

Fifteen-year-old Emery Uhlig says this was her motivation to organize a youth literary festival. As the driving force behind the LitUp Festival, the Prairie Village resident wanted to create space for teenagers to celebrate their love of books.

"In a world where we can have things instantly," she says, "people are moving away from books and toward digital media."

Author Clare Vanderpool agrees.

file photo / Kansas News Service

Kansas lawmakers have approved new restrictions blocking teenagers and out-of-state candidates from future races for governor. The bill says starting next year, candidates must live in Kansas and be at least 25 years old.

The state’s lax laws have led to several teenagers, and residents of other states, joining the campaign for Kansas governor.

A wave of candidates even included a Hutchinson man attempting to enter his dog in the race

Lorie Shaull / Wikimedia Commons

Student activists have taken the lead on conversations about gun control after last month's school shooting in Parkland, Florida. Their calls to action have spurred youth demonstrations across the country, including here in Kansas City. How are teenagers organizing so effectively, and what should parents know about their own kids' interest in social activism? Today, we get answers from family psychologist Wes Crenshaw, and three area high school students.

Teenagers And The #MeToo Movement

Jan 8, 2018
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

From newsrooms to the U.S. Capitol to the stage at the Golden Globes, people are drawing back the curtain on an issue that has plagued our workplaces, homes and schools for years. Today, psychologist Wes Crenshaw returns with a panel of young women to talk about this very issue: sexual assault and harassment. They give us their take on what's going on in the #MeToo movement right now, and let us know why this issue is still especially relevant for people their age.

Danie Alexander / KCUR 89.3

Have a little last minute shopping to do for the young bookworms on your list? With a visit to your local bookstore, and these recommendations from the Johnson County Librarians, you'll be all set. Today, the librarians give us their reading pics for tots to teens and all the kids in-between. 

Guests: 

  • Debbie McCleod, retired librarian.
  • Elena McVicar, youth collections librarian.
  • Dennis Ross, youth services supervisor.

Books:

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

"Where are the brave ones?" 

Academic coach Charlette Wafer looks out across an auditorium of students, administrators and community members at Central Academy of Excellence. She's reciting a poem. 

"Where are the brave ones? The ones who don't use guns to solve problems. The ones who are mentors and provide support before things get started. The ones who aren't afraid to snitch. The ones who are brave enough to stitch ... Our wounds, our community, our families, our city back together. Where are the brave ones?"

Pixabay - CC

From Berkeley to St. Louis to Charlottesville — even on NFL playing fields — youths across the country have been watching the nation's adults respond to issues of race, culture and ideology. Today, psychologist Wes Crenshaw returns with a panel of teens to discuss whether America is measuring up to the democratic values it claims to hold dear.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

The Kansas City Fringe Festival is now officially a teenager. Organizers this year are making a push to reach performers and audiences about that same age, or a little older. 

The 13th annual festival kicked off on July 20, and runs for 11 days — more than 400 performances across 16 venues. The KC Fringe is teaming up with Kansas City Young Audiences to provide more opportunities for teenage actors, singers and dancers.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Whether you spent hours in the summer sun at a lifeguard post or delivered hot, greasy pizzas across town, it's hard to forget your very first job. Today, callers and KCUR staffers share their memories and the lasting impacts of that first job or paycheck. Then, we meet the Kansas City high schooler whose year-long research project into the "suffrajitsu" movement earned her top marks at the National History Day competition.

Is It Teen Angst Or Anxiety Disorder?

Jul 10, 2017
Pixabay - CC

While the challenges of peer pressure, all night study sessions, and "fitting in" aren't new, today's teens also have to deal with social media bringing the worries of the world right to their fingertips. So how is a parent supposed to know the difference between normal teen stress and a possible anxiety disorder? Today, psychologist Wes Crenshaw provides his insight.

Netflix

The Netflix series 13 Reasons Why has received praise and criticism for how it approaches weighty topics such as teen bullying, sexuality, mental illness and suicide. Today we speak with psychologist Wes Crenshaw, who says the drama can encourage important discussions between parents and their children.

Flickr-CC

It can be hard for parents to have a genuine talk with their teen-aged children without it ending up as awkward, emotional, or even worse, unproductive. Today, psychologist Wes Crenshaw discusses what is, and isn't, valid in a conversation with your teen.

Danny Wood / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City Mayor Sly James has announced the expansion of the Hire KC Youth program into a city-wide initiative. The program offers about 200 summer internships but the Mayor appealed to about 80 businesspeople and employment groups at a breakfast meeting to provide more.  

“There is no better social program than a job,” said James. “And when kids have work, when they have a sense of responsibility, then their entire world opens up and barriers and walls fall.”

If you could go back in time, what would you tell your future self?

When she was in high school, KCUR's Lisa Rodriguez wrote a letter to herself. She just received that letter in the mail, in time for her 10-year reunion. She opens the letter for the first time and reads part of it on-air.

Guest:

  • Lisa Rodriguez, KCUR

Social media can be a place where middle schoolers feel like they can develop relationships. But the dangers of sharing information on the Internet can be frightening. We talk about navigating a complicated online world. 

Guest:

  • Dr. Wes Crenshaw is board certified in couples and family psychology. He writes the Double Take column for the Lawrence Journal World.

Jillian Shoptaw / KCUR

Since 2002, The Mortified Podcast has been showcasing adults sharing artifacts from their childhood, most notably, readings from their diaries. 

A few gracious Kansas Citians agreed to dig out their journals and read their most embarrassing entries at a recent KCUR Podcast Party. These are stories about love, anxiety, and angsty rock music.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

What does it mean to be an American teenager? That's been a question posed everywhere from The Catcher in the Rye to Huckleberry Finn. It's also the subject of the Spinning Tree Theatre's production of the musical 13, a show about adolescents — with a cast made up of nineteen of them.

At a recent rehearsal for the company's production of 13, sets are under construction and the musical director is tinkering with the score.

Swipe left or swipe right, mobile dating apps have gotten traction with the younger crowd but do they lead to lasting connections? We ask how young people are using them: as a path to a relationship, or to find sex?

Guests:

  • Wes Crenshaw is board certified in couples and family psychology and the author of I Always Want to Be Where I'm Not: Successful Living with ADD and ADHD.
  • Lauren is an architectural engineer in her early twenties and Tinder user.

Penguin Random House

Are you stumped looking for last-minute gifts for the kids and teens in your life? How about the gift of shape shifting or time traveling? 

It's all possible between the covers of a good book, and these selections represent the best that 2015 had to offer in the way of children's literature.

Johnson County Librarians Dennis Ross and Kate McNair and retired librarian Debbie McLeod offer some recommendations to keep kids and teens reading well into 2016.

For preschool through 2nd grade:

Pornography is readily available and free and young people are taking advantage of that. We talk about how porn can affect their relationship expectations and where it can turn into an addiction.

Guests:

  • Dr. Wes Crenshaw is a psychologist board certified in couples and family psychology.
  • Michael Kraske is the online editor of The Harbinger at Shawnee Mission East High School, where he has written about this subject.
  • Morgan (real name withheld) is a student at UMKC.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Imagine it's 8 p.m. on a Saturday in the mid-1970s.

You're starting the engine of a 1966 Chevrolet Caprice, big block engine, 4-speed manual transmission with a vinyl interior. 

All is dark and quiet in town, but the main square is lit with activity. For perspective, it looks and sounds kind of like American Graffiti — engines revving, music pouring out of open windows, there's hollering and laughter. Cars are lined up, bumper to bumper. For the rest of the night, you're cruising.

Nineteen-year-old Claudia Rivera shares a single-story tract home in Liberal, Kansas, with her boyfriend, 20-year-old Jesùs Varela.

Last month, Varela’s mother moved in so she could watch Rivera’s baby boy, Fabian, while Rivera works at the Dollar General store and Valera pulls down a shift at the local meatpacking plant.

Moving Out

Jul 13, 2015

Whether heading off to college or to a new job, many young adults are preparing to be on their own for the first time.  Up to Date looks at how teens and twenty-somethings can successfully take the training wheels off their adulthood.

Guests:

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