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Film

Robert Viglasky / Bleeker Street

The media cycle has been crazier than usual: a contentious Supreme Court confirmation, campaign commercials kicking into high gear, the stock market taking its biggest single-day tumble in eight months, and — oh, don't fo

An artist in a bright red wig and pink and black polka dotted blouse draws in her studio.
Magnolia Pictures

This rainy weekend will have some folks dreaming to be somewhere else in the world — exploring Japan with a famous artist, wandering the halls of a British High Court, maybe even participating in a Mexican museum heist. Through cinema, you can do all three. This weekend's recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics feature several stories that will take you around the globe. Enjoy!

Steve Walker

"Museo," not rated

Segment 1: It's never too late to travel back home, even when you're 90 years old.

We visit with a Kansas City filmmaker and actress about a locally-made movie exploring themes of aging, memories and wanderlust.

Sundance Selects

It’s always a good day when Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics are in the house to run down the best movies showing in town! Today, they shared their thoughts and reviews of "The Children Act," "Blaze," "Fahrenheit 11/9," "Love, Gilda," "Lizzie," "The Wife," "Pick of the Litter," "The Bookshop," and "Operation Finale."

A judge sits at her desk hearing a trial.
A24

We make hundreds of choices a day — what shirt to wear, or when to eat dinner — but sometimes those choices are a little more difficult. This week's recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics feature decisions about love and murder, starting over after a spouse's death, and life verses religion. 

Cynthia Haines

"The Children Act," R

Black and white photo of Gilda Radner writing in a notebook.
Magnolia Pictures

One woman forges a path for female comics, a widow starts anew by opening her own business and one daughter goes to trial for killing her family. No matter the situation, strong women have found their place on screen this weekend recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics. Celebrate the weekend by being cinematically reminded of all that women can accomplish.

Steve Walker

"Love, Gilda," not rated

Sundance Selects

Whether it's training guide dogs, opening a bookshop or hunting down Nazis, everybody loves a good success story. Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics offer a list of must-see films for this weekend. Take a trip to your local cinema and be inspired by these tales of determination, risk-taking and a little bit of luck. 

Steve Walker

"The Wife," R

A crowd of protestors in Montana holding signs saying "Money + Politics + Corruption" and "Democracy Is Not For Sale."
www.darkmoney.com

Before these rainy days end, use them as the perfect excuse to get out of the weather and into an area movie theater. Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics make it easy with this week's recommendations.

Steve Walker

"Dark Money," Not Rated

Berlin Film Festival

Whether they're embarking on a new business venture, breaking out of languishing personal relationships, or just attempting to survive junior high school, this weekend's recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics are full of women making their own paths. Thier stories aren't just compelling fodder for the silver screen, they also provide inspiration for hopeful trailblazers of all genders.

Steve Walker

"Juliet, Naked," R

Linda Kallerus / Sony Pictures Classics

Some folks go to the movies to see speeding cars and exploding buildings. Others expect wit, whimsy and a barrel of laughs. For those needing to shed a few tears, this week's recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics are sure to do the trick. From a taken-for-granted homemaker to a tween on the cusp of high school, emotions run high throughout the latest batch of theatrical releases.

Cynthia Haines

"Nico, 1988," R

Steve Watkins for U.S. Congress

Segment 1: This reliably Republican Congressional District could be a toss-up, come November.

A relatively unknown Republican candidate's victory in the primaries came as a surprise to many in Kansas' 2nd Congressional District, but it has given Democrats new hope that their nominee for the seat, Paul Davis, might have a chance to flip that political territory. We spoke with GOP insiders to gauge their support for and coalescence around newcomer Steve Watkins, and asked Statehouse reporters about the Democrat he's facing in the midterm.

As the filmmaker's latest collaboration with Spike Lee becomes the must-see movie of the moment, we talk to Kevin Willmott about BlacKkKlansman, race in America, the purpose of satire, and his own life story, which begins in Junction City, Kansas. This hour-long interview is part of our Portrait Session series.

  • Kevin Willmott, filmmaker and KU professor of film and media studies

Bleeker Street

The history of literature and film is strewn with stories of protagonists who don't fit in. This weekend's set of recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics suggests outcasts are still in vogue. Whether their alienation is rooted in psychology, sexuality or something else, these movies all feature characters who struggle — with varying degrees of success — to find value in their individuality.

Steve Walker

"McQueen," R

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