Film | KCUR

Film

Black and white photo of Gilda Radner writing in a notebook.
Magnolia Pictures

One woman forges a path for female comics, a widow starts anew by opening her own business and one daughter goes to trial for killing her family. No matter the situation, strong women have found their place on screen this weekend recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics. Celebrate the weekend by being cinematically reminded of all that women can accomplish.

Steve Walker

"Love, Gilda," not rated

Sundance Selects

Whether it's training guide dogs, opening a bookshop or hunting down Nazis, everybody loves a good success story. Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics offer a list of must-see films for this weekend. Take a trip to your local cinema and be inspired by these tales of determination, risk-taking and a little bit of luck. 

Steve Walker

"The Wife," R

A crowd of protestors in Montana holding signs saying "Money + Politics + Corruption" and "Democracy Is Not For Sale."
www.darkmoney.com

Before these rainy days end, use them as the perfect excuse to get out of the weather and into an area movie theater. Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics make it easy with this week's recommendations.

Steve Walker

"Dark Money," Not Rated

Berlin Film Festival

Whether they're embarking on a new business venture, breaking out of languishing personal relationships, or just attempting to survive junior high school, this weekend's recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics are full of women making their own paths. Thier stories aren't just compelling fodder for the silver screen, they also provide inspiration for hopeful trailblazers of all genders.

Steve Walker

"Juliet, Naked," R

Linda Kallerus / Sony Pictures Classics

Some folks go to the movies to see speeding cars and exploding buildings. Others expect wit, whimsy and a barrel of laughs. For those needing to shed a few tears, this week's recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics are sure to do the trick. From a taken-for-granted homemaker to a tween on the cusp of high school, emotions run high throughout the latest batch of theatrical releases.

Cynthia Haines

"Nico, 1988," R

Steve Watkins for U.S. Congress

Segment 1: This reliably Republican Congressional District could be a toss-up, come November.

A relatively unknown Republican candidate's victory in the primaries came as a surprise to many in Kansas' 2nd Congressional District, but it has given Democrats new hope that their nominee for the seat, Paul Davis, might have a chance to flip that political territory. We spoke with GOP insiders to gauge their support for and coalescence around newcomer Steve Watkins, and asked Statehouse reporters about the Democrat he's facing in the midterm.

As the filmmaker's latest collaboration with Spike Lee becomes the must-see movie of the moment, we talk to Kevin Willmott about BlacKkKlansman, race in America, the purpose of satire, and his own life story, which begins in Junction City, Kansas. This hour-long interview is part of our Portrait Session series.

  • Kevin Willmott, filmmaker and KU professor of film and media studies

Bleeker Street

The history of literature and film is strewn with stories of protagonists who don't fit in. This weekend's set of recommendations from Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics suggests outcasts are still in vogue. Whether their alienation is rooted in psychology, sexuality or something else, these movies all feature characters who struggle — with varying degrees of success — to find value in their individuality.

Steve Walker

"McQueen," R

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

The Royal Theater, once called The Fox Theater, opened in Atchison, Kansas, in 1912 as a vaudeville theater. It later showed films on the silent screen, complete with an in house piano player. They added talkies when they came along in the 1920s.

Erin Johnson

The Berlin Wall was six years from falling when “The Day After” premiered on television in 1983. The film, shot in Lawrence, follows three Kansans as they fight to survive the immediate aftermath of a nuclear attack by the Soviet Union. 

Erin Johnson, a sound and video artist and a visiting assistant professor of art at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine, revisited the film and its legacy for her video installation, “The Way Things Can Happen,” at the Lawrence Arts Center.

Focus Features

Director Spike Lee’s "BlacKkKlansman," which won the Grand Prix at the Cannes Film Festival in May, is finally opening in theaters nationwide. 

Lee's co-writer is University of Kansas film professor Kevin Willmott, who spoke with KCUR's Central Standard host Gina Kaufmann about the movie, which is based on a true story.

Josh Ethan Johnson / A24

With the Kansas City Royals languishing and the Chiefs off to a disappointing preseason start, sports fans looking for respite (and not willing make the drive to see Sporting KC contend for the Western Conference) might consider a trip to their favorite cinema. Up To Date's Film Critics have offered up a selection of movies for your weekend consideration. What they lack in home runs and touchdowns, they more than make up for in heart.

Cynthia Haines

"The Cakemaker," not rated

Fred Rogers wearing his trademark sweater sitting next to a toy trolley car on the set of Mr. Rogers' Neighborhood.
Focus Features / Comcast

The summer is winding down and throughout the season we've kept you abreast of the best in art house circuit movies. Before school is back in session, our film critics offer their picks of the best flicks of the week. 

Steve Walker

"Leave No Trace" PG

  • "Winter's Bone" director Debra Granik steers this taut drama about an Iraqi war vet, played by Ben Foster, and his teenage daughter living off the land in an Oregon park until the authorities try to quash their lifestyle choices.

"Generation Wealth" R

Rural Movie Theaters

Jul 31, 2018

Movie theaters are more than a place to watch the latest blockbuster. They're a place of first dates. A place to get out of the rain. A place where communities can share an experience. But what happens to a small town if they lose that theater? On this episode, we explore what's causing rural movie theaters to close and learn about the efforts to keep them alive. 

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