© 2022 Kansas City Public Radio
NPR in Kansas City
Play Live Radio
Next Up:
0:00
0:00
Available On Air Stations
Community

Accused Jewish Community Center Shooter Will Stand Trial

IMG_1967.jpg__JCCShotterCar.jpg
Laura Ziegler
/
KCUR

The man accused of killing three people at two Overland Park, Kan., Jewish sites last spring will stand trial for capital murder, attempted murder, aggravated assault and other charges stemming from the shootings.

Johnson County District Court Judge Thomas Kelly Ryan found the state had established probable cause in its case against Frazier Glenn Cross Jr., 74. The judge agreed with a request from Cross' legal team to postpone arraignment.

The two-day preliminary hearing for Cross, a known anti-Semite who also goes by the name Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., wrapped up Tuesday with testimony from forensic experts and crime scene investigators from the Johnson County Sheriff's Office.

Deputy Coroner Charles Glenn described the autopsies he performed on William Corporon, 69; Reat Underwood, 14; and Terri LaManno, 53; in the days after the April 13, 2014, shootings.

Glenn said the shot that killed Corporon was taken at "close range" and would have killed him instantly.

"There's a tremendous amount of force with this type of injury," Glenn testified.

He also described the gunshot wound Underwood sustained. The prosecutor asked Glenn what that type of injury does to a person.

"It causes death," Glenn replied.

David Wright said his job with the sheriff's office is to answer the question, "Did something from a crime scene come from a particular firearm?"

He was able to link the majority of bullet and shell casings recovered from the Jewish Community Center and Village Shalom to the four firearms recovered from Cross' car, a white Suzuki sedan, on the day of the shooting.

Crime scene investigators also confiscated various unspent ammunition from the trunk, including a kind of shotgun shell known as "double-ought buck."

Asked if it was a "powerful round," Wright paused, then said yes.

"Given its application in law enforcement, self defense and large game hunting," he said.

Wright's testimony matched various eyewitnesses' accounts of the shooter using multiple weapons on the day of the shooting.

Cross' lawyer, Martin Warhurst, did not cross-examine any of the witnesses called Tuesday.

KCUR serves the Kansas City region with breaking news and powerful storytelling.
Your donation helps make non-profit journalism available for everyone.