Bill Chappell | KCUR

Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and editor on the News Desk in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work for NPR includes being the lead writer for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London in 2012 and Rio in 2016 to Pyeongchang in 2018 – stints that also included posting numerous videos and photos to NPR's Instagram and other branded accounts. He has also previously been NPR.org's homepage editor.

Chappell established the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR's website; his assignments also include being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road. Chappell has coordinated special digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He also frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as The Salt.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to tell compelling stories, promoting more collaboration between departments and desks.

Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that performed one of NPR's largest website redesigns. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, working with reporters in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America. Chappell also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division, before moving on to edit video and produce stories for Sports Illustrated's website.

Early in his career, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants, and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

The silver-backed chevrotain — a mysterious animal that's the size of a rabbit but looks like a silver-splashed deer — has been photographed in the wild for the first time. The chevrotain is the world's smallest hoofed mammal, or ungulate.

Scientists say they have rediscovered a type of chevrotain that had been "lost to science" for nearly 30 years.

Updated at 11:15 a.m. ET

Hong Kong police shot an apparently unarmed protester on Monday, fueling outrage among pro-democracy activists on a day of violent clashes. In a separate incident, a man was set on fire during an argument about the demonstrations that have roiled the city.

Nike says it's investigating claims of physical and mental abuse in its now-defunct Oregon Project in response to former running phenom Mary Cain's harrowing account of her time under disgraced coach Alberto Salazar.

Cain says she paid a steep price during her time with the elite distance-running program, from self-harm and suicidal thoughts to broken bones related to her declining health.

The Senate has approved a bill to make severe animal cruelty and torture a federal crime. With the House having passed an identical version of the bill last month, the measure now goes to President Trump, who is expected to sign it into law.

A Chinese court has imposed a suspended death sentence on one accused drug trafficker and hit eight others with life sentences and other prison terms, after the nine Chinese citizens pleaded guilty to smuggling fentanyl to the U.S.

Several members of the extended family of Mormons whose relatives were attacked in northern Mexico on Monday are speaking out, saying it's time to reject gang violence. As family members prepare to bury the nine victims killed in that attack, they also say both the U.S. and Mexico should be part of the solution.

Updated at 4:22 p.m. ET

Three women and six children were killed in an attack on members of a Mormon family as they traveled in Mexico on Monday, according to Mexican officials. Relatives say all of those killed were U.S. citizens, and authorities in the state of Sonora say the group was "ambushed by a group of armed people."

Workers at Microsoft Japan enjoyed an enviable perk this summer: working four days a week, enjoying a three-day weekend — and getting their normal, five-day paycheck. The result, the company says, was a productivity boost of 40%.

Apple is pledging $2.5 billion to confront California's housing crisis, in a bid to help the state ease a situation that's been blamed for marginalizing people in service and support jobs and creating a spike in homelessness.

The Department of Justice has reached a settlement to recover more than $700 million in assets from Low Taek Jho, a.k.a. Jho Low, related to a kleptocracy scandal that centers on a Malaysian sovereign wealth fund called 1Malaysia Development Berhad — or 1MDB, as it's widely known.

The assets range from a luxury boutique hotel in Beverly Hills to millions of dollars in business holdings.

Updated at 10:48 a.m. ET

Facebook unveiled a new way of delivering news to users Friday, in the latest change to its approach to journalism. The company says Facebook News will connect users to stories that are personalized for their interests and also highlight "the most relevant national stories of the day."

Facebook News is being tested with a subset of mobile app users starting Friday, the company says. And Facebook has hired a small team of journalists who will pick the stories that show up in one of the sections of the app, called Today's Stories.

British police say the 39 bodies that were discovered in a refrigerated trailer in Essex are all believed to be Chinese nationals. An investigation into possible human smuggling and murder was sparked when the truck container was found east of London on Wednesday.

The truck's driver, a 25-year-old man from Northern Ireland, remains in custody after being arrested on suspicion of murder. On Thursday, police secured a warrant to hold him for up to an additional 24 hours as they continue to investigate.

Former President Jimmy Carter suffered a "minor pelvic fracture" after falling down in his home in Plains, Ga., Monday night, the Carter Center says. It's the second time Carter has been hurt in a fall this month; he got a black eye from a fall days after he turned 95 on Oct. 1.

Carter "has been admitted to Phoebe Sumter Medical Center for observation and treatment of a minor pelvic fracture," the Carter Center said in an announcement Tuesday. The center adds, "He is in good spirits and is looking forward to recovering at home."

Two blasts devastated a mosque in eastern Afghanistan during Friday prayers, killing at least 62 people and wounding dozens more, according to the local government in Nangarhar province.

There has been no claim of responsibility so far. Afghan outlet TOLOnews reports, "The Taliban has denied responsibility for the blasts."

General Motors and the United Auto Workers have reached a tentative agreement to end the strike that began one month ago, the labor union announced Wednesday. The UAW GM National Council will vote on the deal Thursday.

When the national council reviews the deal's terms, it will also decide whether nearly 50,000 workers should remain on strike or whether they should go back to work before the full membership ratifies the agreement.

Updated at 2:20 p.m. ET

Turkish forces began crossing the Syrian border on Wednesday, launching an operation in Kurdish-dominated areas of the country's north, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan announced.

The Turkish offensive jeopardizes Kurdish-led forces who have been a key U.S. ally in the bloody fight against ISIS. Turkey says those same forces are linked to militant groups who stage attacks in a separatist movement against the Turkish government.

Updated at 7:30 p.m. ET

Kurdish allies of the U.S. say President Trump's decision to pull troops from the Syria-Turkey border is "shocking" and deflating — and they warn that the U.S. is duplicating a mistake it made in Iraq, where it has ceded partial control to Iran.

Within hours of the announcement from the White House late Sunday, local Kurdish forces on the ground confirmed to NPR that U.S. soldiers began leaving bases in Tel Abyad and Ras al Ayn, in Syria near the Syria-Turkey border.

Large protests have triggered a state of emergency in Ecuador, after President Lenín Moreno moved ahead with his plan to end fuel subsidies. Moreno says he's ending the "perverse" gasoline subsidy after 40 years because it was distorting Ecuador's economy.

Updated at 7:16 p.m. ET

Brandt Jean's extraordinary response to a convicted murderer — he hugged Amber Guyger as she was sentenced for killing his brother, Botham Jean — has provoked an array of reactions, from admiration to frustration. It has also deepened a national debate over regulating police use of force.

Hong Kong's government is expected to take the rare step of invoking emergency powers on Friday so that it can enact a ban on face masks like the ones pro-democracy protesters have worn during months of demonstrations.

Media reports of the possible action emerged days after police shot a pro-democracy protester in the chest during an altercation, signaling a new escalation by authorities and bringing protesters' rage to new heights.

Updated at 3:22 p.m. ET

The World Trade Organization says the U.S. can move forward with plans to impose some $7.5 billion in tariffs on EU goods annually, to counteract years of European loans and illegal subsidies to Airbus.

The decision comes after a years-long dispute over European Union countries' roles in building Airbus into a global player — and a fierce competitor to U.S. aerospace giant Boeing.

Updated at 1:38 p.m. ET

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has publicly acknowledged that he was listening to the July 25 phone call between President Trump and Ukrainian President Volodymyr Zelenskiy that has sparked an impeachment inquiry.

"I was on the phone call," Pompeo said Wednesday in Rome.

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has banned Alberto Salazar, the famed track coach and former marathon champion, for four years. USADA says Salazar trafficked testosterone, infused a prohibited amount of L-carnitine and tried to tamper with doping controls.

Salazar is the head coach for long-distance running at the Nike Oregon Project, an elite program where he has worked with track stars such as Mo Farah. The ban comes after an independent panel of the American Arbitration Association decided to punish Salazar and his colleague Dr. Jeffrey Brown, a former consultant with Nike.

The NFL is suspending Oakland Raiders linebacker Vontaze Burfict without pay for the rest of the 2019 season, after Burfict lowered his head to make helmet-to-helmet contact during a tackle this weekend.

"The discipline marks the longest punishment ever handed down for an on-field act in NFL history," NFL.com says in regard to Burfict, who has repeatedly violated the league's unnecessary roughness rules.

Montana is under emergency conditions after an intense winter storm dumped record amounts of snow along with a life-threatening combination of bitter cold and stiff winds. In the town of Browning, 48 inches of snow fell from Friday to Sunday, the National Weather Service says.

Despite coming in late September, the 19.3 inches of snow that just fell over two days in Great Falls is second to only one other two-day total in the city — in any month. The only time the city recorded more snow in two days was during a winter storm more than 10 years ago.

The gap between the richest and the poorest U.S. households is now the largest it's been in the past 50 years — despite the median U.S. income hitting a new record in 2018, according to new data from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Updated at 4:02 p.m. ET

Federal prosecutors are charging 11 doctors with unlawfully distributing opioids and other substances, in the second large operation to target "pill mill" operators and health care fraud this year. Two other people also face charges in the sting.

"The alleged conduct resulted in the distribution of more than 17 million pills" in the Appalachian region, the Justice Department said.

Iran is facing off with rival Saudi Arabia in Yemen, trading barbs with President Trump and threatening the movement of oil. But none of those things prevented Iranian President Hassan Rouhani from unveiling something a bit unexpected at the U.N. General Assembly on Wednesday: a regional peace proposal.

"Ladies and gentlemen, the Middle East is burning in the flames of war, bloodshed, aggression, occupation and religious and sectarian fanaticism and extremism," Rouhani said.

Google and other search engines must agree to European citizens' requests for some information about them to be "forgotten" online — but that process shouldn't be global, and it applies only to search sites in the EU, the European Court of Justice says.

The ruling is a win for Google, as it puts new restrictions on a 2014 European Union court decision that affirmed individuals' rights to ask tech companies to remove URLs from search results related to their name.

The Thomas Cook travel agency and airline abruptly collapsed Monday morning, putting tens of thousands of jobs at risk. More than 150,000 travelers are currently abroad, leaving the U.K. government to carry out what Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab calls the "biggest peacetime repatriation in U.K. history."

It's a stark turn of events for a company with more than 170 years of history, whose roots stretch back to the height of the British Empire.

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