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Former Kansas City Public Schools president writes memoir about raising son with Down syndrome

Edward Newsome II and Edward Newsome pose for a photo
Courtesy of Edward Newsome
Edward Newsome II and his father, Edward Newsome.

Edward Newsome's new book, "Down Syndrome & The Power of a Father’s Love,” chronicles his life and experience raising a child with a developmental disability.

Edward Newsome, a father of an adult son with down syndrome, wrote a book with his son, Edward Newsome II.

Titled “Down Syndrome & The Power of a Father’s Love,” Newsome's book chronicles his life and his experience raising a child with Down syndrome. He says the bond they have helped him navigate the complexity of raising a child with special needs.

“My son really taught me how to love," Newsome said. "He taught me how to be forgiving."

While there are more resources now available for parents and children with developmental disabilities than when his son was born 45 years ago, Newsome says there is still more to be done.

“There are still some gaps in the system that does not… give a good, fair opportunity to people who are born with special needs,” Newsome said.

  • Edward Newsome, author, former board president of Kansas City Public Schools
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Sireen Abayazid is the Up To Date intern. She is a native of Omaha and a recent graduate of Mizzou, where she earned a bachelor’s degree in journalism. Email her at sabayazid@kcur.org.
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