Up To Date's Indie, Foreign & Doc Critics' 'Three To See,' October 12-14 | KCUR

Up To Date's Indie, Foreign & Doc Critics' 'Three To See,' October 12-14

5 hours ago

The media cycle has been crazier than usual: a contentious Supreme Court confirmation, campaign commercials kicking into high gear, the stock market taking its biggest single-day tumble in eight months, and — oh, don't forget! — a giant hurricane tearing across the Southeast. For those who just can't come up with the words anymore to describe the exhaustion, a break is in order. If following the social media trail of a national park fat bear contest doesn't do the trick, maybe a movie will. Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics have some new recommendations for your consideration.

Cynthia Haines

"The Bookshop," PG

  • In this documentary, world renowned artist Yayoi Kusama paints a new picture. This one is of her conservative childhood in Japan, a lifelong battle with mental illness and the hard-won fight to be the most popular female artist in the world.

"Colette," R

  • A biographical drama about Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette's rise from self-described French country girl to the talk of Paris at the turn of the 20th century. A vibrant Keira Knightley stars alongside Dominic West's energetic portrayal of Henry Gauthier-Villars.

"Kusama: Infinity," not rated

  • In this documentary, world renowned artist Yayoi Kusama paints a new picture. This one is of her conservative childhood in Japan, a lifelong battle with mental illness and the hard-won fight to be the most popular female artist in the world.

Steve Walker

"Colette," R

  • Keira Knightley is fierce and steely as the main title character, the celebrated, often scandalous French novelist who eventually wrote under her own name after her husband takes credit for her successful early books.

"Black '47," R

  • On its surface, this historical drama is like a "Death Wish" revenge story set during the 1847 Ireland potato famine but is more accurately an examination of the xenophobia, economic disparity and post-war malaise of the time.

"All About Nina," R

  • Indie regular Mary Elizabeth Winstead gives a gritty performance as a profane stand-up comic forced to reconcile her intimacy issues and childhood traumas with a man, played by Common, who seems like a really good match.