A People's History of Kansas City | KCUR

A People's History of Kansas City

Tales of everyday heroes, renegades and visionaries who shaped Kansas City and the region. If these stories aren't told, they're in danger of fading into the past.

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | Stitcher

Jim The Wonder Dog

Mar 19, 2020

The real life story of an amazingly intelligent dog who captured people's imagination in Depression-era Missouri.

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | Stitcher

Suzanne Hogan and Crysta Henthorne / KCUR 89.3

Listen to this episode of A People's History Of Kansas City, a new podcast from KCUR 89.3. For more stories like this one, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, SpotifyGoogle Play and Stitcher.

It was 1956 in Kansas City. Leila Cohoon had just left her job at a salon to find some new shoes for Easter on the Country Club Plaza.

And then she saw an object in the window of an antique store that would change her life. A little woven wreath in a gold frame — hair art.

Leila's Hair Museum

Mar 12, 2020

A cosmetologist becomes obsessed with the Victorian tradition of hair art, and amasses the world's largest collection in Independence, Missouri. Each of these art pieces is woven with human hair, often in memory of loved ones and friends. Leila's Hair Museum has revived the art and launched a 21st century tradition of hair jewelry.

kansasmemory.org / Kansas State Historical Society, Copy and Reuse Restrictions Apply

The story of the pugnacious Kansas sheriff and attorney general Vern Miller, whose antics seemed to be a throwback to the Wild West era but left a surprising legacy.

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play | Stitcher

Courtesy of the Missouri Valley Room / Kansas City Public Library, Kansas City, Missouri

The oldest continuously-operating Latino services center in the United States is right here in Kansas City. 101 years ago, the Guadalupe Center was established to "Americanize" Mexicans who had moved here to work on the railroads. But over the course of a century, Latinos transformed the organization, and Kansas City.

Many early, unique dialects of German are preserved in communities in small towns in Missouri and Kansas. But they're endangered. Meet a handful of linguistic diehards in Cole Camp, Missouri, and hear about their valiant efforts to save their immigrant history. 

J.E. Miller / Courtesy of Missouri Valley Room, Kansas City Public Library, Kansas City, Missouri.

The prestigious, historically black high school in Kansas City is becoming more integrated. Hear how Lincoln's alumni, students and faculty are trying to make sure the school's legacy as an incubator for black excellence is not forgotten.

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play

Crysta Henthorne / KCUR 89.3

Listen to this episode of A People's History Of Kansas City, a new podcast from KCUR 89.3. For more stories like this one, subscribe on Apple Podcasts, SpotifyGoogle Play or Stitcher.

In the center of downtown Kansas City, Kansas, between the public library and government buildings just off Minnesota Avenue, sits a two-acre cemetery.

The sign reads "Huron Indian Cemetery," but it’s also known as the Wyandot National Burying Ground and has long been a sacred place for members of the Wyandot Nation.

Three sisters barricaded themselves in a Wyandot cemetery in downtown Kansas City, Kansas, in the early 1900s, in order to save it from destruction. Hear how the Wyandot came to settle in Kansas, and how one of those sisters, Lyda Conley, took the battle over the cemetery all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

KCUR's Suzanne Hogan brings you tales of the everyday heroes, renegades and visionaries who shaped Kansas City and the region. If these stories aren't told, they're in danger of fading into the past. The first episode drops February 6.

Apple Podcasts | Spotify | Google Play