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Segment 1: Can trust in the American electoral system be restored?

As the 2020 election season takes shape, the fairness and security of our electoral systems are being questioned by regular voters, politicians and the intelligence community alike. From voter supression to foreign influence campaigns, we get a threat assessment for electoral integrity in the U.S.

Segment 1: Kansas lawmakers are debating a bill to end hair discrimination.

The idea behind the CROWN Act is to ban employers and schools from expecting people of color to adopt "white hair norms" in the workplace and the classroom. 

Segment 1: A key player in Kansas City's hip hop community died unexpectedly.

In addition to being a producer for Ces Cru, Justin "Info Gates" Gillespie started the Beat Academy of Kansas City at the Plaza Academy, touching a lot of teens. Now the hip hop community is banding together to carry on his legacy and make sure those teens will continue to be supported.

Segment 1: Who gets to tell what stories? 

Controversy over a novel called “American Dirt” led to a canceled book tour—a week before author Jeanine Cummins was set to come to Kansas City. Critics have a problem with the fact that Cummins is white, yet wrote a book about a Mexican family trying to make it across the US-Mexico border.

Segment 1: A new book from an MU professor says hidden fees are chipping away at the middle class.

A professor of History, Black Studies, and Public Affairs at Mizzou says banking fees, mortgage fees, student loan fees, and payday loan fees disproportionately affect people, with the wealthy being able to largely avoid them. 

Segment 1: Why we keep the objects that we keep.

If you were to pick one object in your possession that brings you meaning and joy, what would it be? An author shares intimate stories behind memories of knick-knacks, baubles, and even scraps of paper.

Segment 2, beginning at 33:45: When was the last time you had a Kansas City taco?

Segment 1: Missouri does not enforce a 2008 federal law on mental health parity.

When President George W. Bush signed the Paul Wellstone and Pete Domenici Mental Health Parity and Addictions Equity Act in 2008, it established that health insurers must cover mental health the same as other medical conditions. Missouri remains one of only two states to not enforce that law with a state statute.

Segment 1: Morgan Orozco is a sixteen-year old who's playing an active part in local government. 

Sick of waiting for adults to do something about climate change, this high schooler is taking matters into her own hands.

  • Morgan Orozco, Sustainability Advisory Board member, City of Lawrence; vice chair, Kansas High School Democrats

Segment 2, beginning at 23:16: A tale of mice, friendship and what's really important.

Segment 1: One professor's move from New York City to rural North Carolina taught him lessons in bridging America's partisan divide.

Segment 1: The annual influenza vaccination is still considered the best way to protect against the virus and its complications.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention continue to recommend that everyone six months and older get a yearly flu shot, yet the CDC estimates only about 45% of American adults got it during the prior flu season. Two public health professionals address the misconceptions and myths that keep people from getting vaccinated.

Segment 1: Voters will next month determine the fate of the Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard name.

Residents displeased with the process of renaming The Paseo petitioned to restore its original name, leaving a heated debate to be settled by voters on November 5. The Rev. Vernon Howard Jr., an advocate for renaming the boulevard after the civil rights leader, says "this issue is also about race," but the group that collected more than 2,000 signatures says they reflect people of all backgrounds who want their voices heard.

Segment 1: Trauma centers in Kansas City are hopeful their preparation for a mass shooting will never play out.

Mass casualties strike with no warning, inevitably creating chaos, but hospitals are training for that exact situation. "The regional preparation that occurs in Kansas City is outstanding," says trauma surgeon Dr. Robert Winfield. Learn how trauma centers are preparing for the possibilty of a mass shooting.

Segment 1: Two men formed an unlikely friendship through a shared tragedy.

Tariq Khamisa was a 20-year-old college student delivering a pizza in 1995 when he was shot and killed by 14-year-old Tony Hicks. Azim Khamisa said he reached out to Ples Felix, the grandfather of his son's murderer, because he saw "victims at both ends of the gun." They became friends and work together in addressing gun violence through The Forgiveness Project.

Segment 1: XP-1, a possible future mode of high-speed transportation, will be on display in Kansas City.

The Hyperloop test pod known as XP-1 is leaving its test site in Nevada and making a stop Kansas City. One expert said, rather than investing in additional lanes for I-70, the multi-billion-dollar hyperloop project could be a more effective use of land, money, and time for travelers between St. Louis and Kansas City. Learn more about the feasibility and funding of the future of transportation. 

The Making Of Koch Industries

Aug 27, 2019

You won't see its name on many products but the Wichita-based conglomerate touches the lives of most Americans.

Charles and David Koch took their father's oil-refining business and converted it into the second largest privately held corporation in North America. Business writer Chris Leonard discussed what has been behind the brothers' success, their past transgressions against Native Americans and environmental law, and their influence on American politics.

Segment 1: A Fringe-famous performer tells his story.

Brother John is a pastor and storyteller who researches characters from African-American history then creates performances that bring history to life. He's become a regular contributor to Kansas City's Fringe Festival. This year, he's focusing on Smoky Robinson.

Segment 1: Where a new mother lives often affects her ability to find treatment

Postpartum depression affects women of all demographics, but those in rural areas are particularly unable to take advantage of certain treatment options. Kansas City medical professionals reviewed some of the resources available in the region and discussed the challenges of connecting those to the mothers who most need them.

Segment 1: American patriotism through the years

Some things never change, like the American need to blow things up on Independence Day. Not as predictable is our collective definition of patriotism. The concept has sustained the country's 243 years, but does it mean the same thing today as it did during the 1770s, 1870s or 1970s?

Segment 1: Now that controversial diversity training has been approved, embattled superintendent is "just ready to move forward on behalf of young people."   

When Lee's Summit R-7 District Superintendent Dennis Carpenter proposed diversity training for the staff, he received backlash from some in the community and among employees. Carpenter spoke on what the months-long dispute could mean for the district's future and what the diversity training is about. 

Segment 1: Mark Dupree wants to make the Unified Government's justice system more equitable.

Wyandotte County District Attorney Mark Dupree talked with us about the summer expungement program, a new conviction integrity unit and the prosecution of Lamonte McIntyre, and calls from community members to fire Police Chief Terry Ziegler. It all fits into his larger effort to correct past wrongs in his jurisdiction.

Segment 1: Why does Kansas City look like swiss cheese?

If you look at a map of Kansas City, you'll find little holes of independent towns, such as Platte Woods and North Kansas City. We speak with representatives from some of these non-annexed communities to talk about how these tiny towns fit into the fabric of the bigger city.

Segment 1: Councilman Dan Fowler and his challenger Kevin McEvoy talk plans for one of Kansas City's two Northland council districts.

Before the June 18 municipal election, we asked the 2nd District candidates about funding for the new KCI terminal, violent crime and why each would be the best fit for a seat on the council.

Segment 1: Researchers explain the data of who is receiving an abortion and why.

A study by Guttmacher Institute analyzed data from their 2008 and 2014 surveys on abortion and found an increase in the proportion of low-income women who received abortions. The University of California San Francisco conducted its own study following women who were able to receive an abortion, and contrasted the unintended effects of pregnancy with those women who were denied an abortion.

Segment 1: Could a retail model make health care in America more affordable?

As the country grapples with the ever-increasing cost of health care, we consider a model that minimizes the government's role and cuts out many middlemen. Two scholars describe a retail system that would subsidize care for the poor, allow consumers to make their own purchasing decisions, and help people focus on the care they want and value.

Segment 1: 4th District candidates for Kansas City Council.

Kansas City firefighter Geoff Jolley and co-founder of BikeWalkKC Eric Bunch are competing for the 4th District City Council seat vacated by mayoral candidate Jolie Justus. Both look to make the city safer and more responsive to residents, but the top priorities for the 4-year term look different for each.

Segment 1: Celeste Ng

Best-selling author Celeste Ng's most recent book is about a lot of things: idealism gone awry, the dark-side of suburbia, and just how complicated family relationships are.

Seg. 1: What We Keep | Seg. 2: Kansas City Tacos

May 15, 2019

Segment 1: What We Keep

If you were to pick one object in your possession to keep that brings you meaning and joy, what would it be? An author shares intimate stories behind memories of knick-knacks, baubles, and even scraps of paper.

Segment 2, beginning at 34:21: Kansas City Tacos

Segment 1: Local lawyer finds a niche in space law

Space is an exciting new frontier, challenging humanity to advance in math, science, and engineering. But what about law? We hear from a Kansas City lawyer who has made a name for himself in dealing with the ownership of objects originating from space.

  • Chris McHugh, lawyer

Segment 2, beginning at 15:35: Mark Twain's love letter to American cuisine

Segment 1: The author of "One by One" shares his battle with opioid addiction.

Nicholas Bush found himself hiding from police for crimes related to his to an opioid addiction. After 10 years of drug abuse and the loss of two siblings, Bush was finally able to kick his habit after a dream involving his deceased sister.

Segment 1: Deadly domestic violence cases reached a twenty-year high in Johnson County, Kansas. 

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