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babies

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

TOPEKA, Kansas — Kansans will likely vote this August on whether to become the fourth state to enshrine in their constitution that abortion isn't a right.

Anti-abortion activists say Kansas needs the change to protect its current abortion laws against potential court challenges.  

Their abortion rights counterparts warn many of those laws already go too far, and the constitutional amendment would pave the way for making abortion illegal.

Where does Kansas law stand on abortion today?

Segment 1: A young Kansas City poet reads Dear White Police Officer.

Veronica Clay was one of the featured performers at the Kansas City Jazz Museum for last year's Martin Luther King Day celebration (2019). This is a rebroadcast of a conversation about the poem she read, and her experience of race in Kansas City.

  • Veronica Clay, poet and spoken word artist

Segment 2: What premature birth can teach us about being human.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

COFFEYVILLE, KANSAS — Preschool was a logistical boon for Delice Downing and an educational bonanza for her son, Adrian.

The head volleyball coach and director of student life at Coffeyville Community College had ruled out day care when she heard the price: several hundred dollars a week.

Then Adrian reached preschool age. Coffeyville offers something most Kansas communities don’t: free attendance at a preschool with room for nearly all kids in town whose parents want it.

Woman poses in front of backdrop in KCUR studio
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Every woman who gives birth has the possibility of developing postpartum depression. That includes nearly one in seven mothers in Missouri, which ranks 11th in the nation for those who experience the condition, according to the the United Health Foundation.

Dan Margolies / KCUR 89.3

Buoyed by the biggest gift in its history, $10 million from the Sunderland Foundation, Truman Medical Centers on Thursday launched an ambitious campaign to raise nearly $19 million to upgrade its neonatal intensive care unit.

The push to modernize and expand Truman's NICU has locked in pledges of $14 million, according to hospital officials. That includes additional commitments of $2.5 million from the Hall Family Foundation and other contributors such as Waddell and Reed CEO Phil Sanders, the president of Truman’s board. 

Many Kansas families may not be following safe sleep practices meant to cut down the risk that infants could die in their sleep.

The first survey of its kind in the state found four in five new mothers said their babies sleep primarily on their backs.

Rachel Sisson, the director of the Bureau of Family Health at the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, wants to make it five out of five.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Will redevelopment on a single block of Troost be the bellweather for how the city revitalizes other neighborhoods?

Intel Free Press / Flickr - CC

Kansas City has its fair share of historic buildings, but they're not always easy to find and appreciate. Today, learn how a new guidebook is bringing these sites to people's attention. Then, pediatrician Dr.

Wikimedia Commons

One of the top concerns for those with a newborn is sleep. Today, we talk with pediatric experts about strategies to help parents develop good sleep habits for their infant. We also discuss the science behind infant sleeping patterns and how to adjust your approach as the child grows older.

Up All Night

Jun 9, 2017
Sylvia Maria Gross / KCUR 89.3

Weird stuff happens in the middle of the night. We share stories recorded at a live storytelling event hosted by Gina.

Subscribe on Apple PodcastsGoogle Play and Stitcher.

Andrew Turner / Flickr - CC

Parents want to know their kids are on track when it comes to hitting key developmental milestones. At what age should your child be able to perform certain tasks — feeding themselves, walking, or talking, for instance — and when is it time to worry? We talk with pediatric experts about gauging your little one's progress, and how to keep an eye out for potentially critical delays.

The cost of a premature birth was the beginning of a controversy involving the price of health care, AOL’s CEO and the baby's mother. The dispute sparked a national debate about the value of a human life.

Guests:

Kansas midwives who say they can safely help women deliver babies without formal physician partnerships made their case this week before a legislative committee.

In a presentation that noted that midwifery dates back to ancient times, Johnson County midwife Catherine Gordon told the House Health and Human Services Committee that more women nationwide are turning to midwives rather than hospitals to help them during childbirth.

“What you’re going to see is a huge change in the U.S.,” Gordon said. “It’s already happening.”

An estimated 17,000 Kansas City kids don't have enough diapers.

Their families just can't afford them.

"Diapers and other hygiene products – including cleaning supplies – are not provided by any state or federal subsidy," says Joanne Goldblum, executive director of the National Diaper Bank Network.

And diapers, especially the disposable kind required by most childcare centers, are a significant expense, up to $100 a week.

If that amount seems high, Goldblum says it's because poor families don't have the same resources as wealthier ones.

Trevor / Flickr, Creative Commons

Expecting a new baby can force many parents to make complicated financial decisions. On Monday's Central Standard, we were joined by the Cash Money Crew to discuss how to approach and manage the monetary costs that come with a new child.

Guests:

Rchristie/Flickr-CC

It wasn’t until the second half of the 20th century that expectant parents could see and hear their baby through means of ultrasound and Doppler. With those advances also came a dramatic change in how we view early pregnancy loss.

In the first part of Tuesday's Up to Date, we talk with a historian of women’s health about the impact of technology on first trimester miscarriages and how what was once considered an abnormal period is now the lossof a baby.

Fatty Acids In Baby Formula Show Lasting Benefits

Aug 14, 2013
Wikimedia -- Creative Commons

Researchers at the University of Kansas say fatty acids added to baby formula produce lasting gains in intelligence and performance.

Infant formula has been enriched with fatty acids since 2001, based in part on research done by University of Kansas scientists John Colombo and Susan Carlson.  The new findings by Colombo and Carlson are based on 81 babies who were tested every six months over a span of six years. 

WyCo Effort Aims To Curb Infant Mortality

May 12, 2013
Willem Velthoven

With one of the highest infant mortality rates in the country, Wyandotte County is taking steps to fix that problem.

Baby Care: The First Few Months

May 12, 2013
Weird Beard

When you're a parent—especially a first-time parent—you worry about all kinds of things you see in your baby's development.

Over the years, plenty have poked fun at the calming nature of public radio (the "Delicious Dish," anyone?)  But no producer thinks it's good when their host lulls listeners to sleep.  Unless, that is, that listener is a crying 8-month-old baby suffering from great discomfort - like teething.

In the final portion of Wednesday's Up to Date, hear the story of Hamza Husein, whose infancy is a bit more manageable due to the sultry and soothing sounds of Steve Kraske.

(No, we're not kidding.)

Discarded Baby Regs to Grow in KC

Sep 3, 2010

Kansas City, MO – Eight years after Missouri passed a law to protect abandoned babies, Kansas City, Missouri agrees to take part in a program letting the public know about it.
It doesn't happen often, but when a newborn is abandoned and in danger there is general shock and horror.

Premature Births Decline In Kansas City

Jun 8, 2010

Kansas City, Mo. – More babies are making it to the full nine-month term in Kansas City. But experts aren't sure why.

Between 1990 and 2006, the rate of pre-term births escalated in Kansas City and around the country. A new study from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that rates are now starting to finally go down.

The pre-term birth rate in Kansas City, Missouri dropped by almost two percentage points between 2005 and 2008.