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Segment 1: Congressman for Missouri's 5th district shares his stance on the current  impeachment inquiry.

Representative Emanuel Cleaver said constituents in Missouri's 5th District have mixed feelings on impeaching the president. Cleaver has been cautious in his calls for impeachment, but is now certain a crime was committed. Learn why he said, "It's not so much a political crime as it is a civil crime." 

Nomin Ujiyediin / Kansas News Service

Maria Galvan used to make about $25,000 a year. She didn’t qualify for welfare, but she still had trouble meeting her basic needs.

“I would just be working just to be poor and broke,” she said. “It would be so frustrating.”

When things got bad, the single mother and Topeka resident took out a payday loan. That meant borrowing a small amount of money at a high interest rate, to be paid off as soon as she got her next check.

Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art

Some in the art world are protesting the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art because of a tenuous connection to the Trump administration’s immigration policies.

Mike Mozart / Creative Commons - Flickr

Wells Fargo has agreed to a second round of payments to more than 400 members of the military whose personal vehicles the banking giant repossessed while they were on active duty.

Each service member victimized by the bank will receive $12,300 from a $5 million-plus settlement fund Wells Fargo has agreed to set up. The settlement resolves a federal class action lawsuit filed in Topeka in 2017 by Jin Nakamura,  a soldier stationed at Fort Riley, Kansas.

Segment 1: The voter ID laws enacted in 35 states are inefficient and have little to no impact.

Peggy Lowe / KCUR 89.3

When Josh Collins first got the letter from Bank of America more than two months ago, he thought it was a scam.

The letter wasn’t on the glossy paper typical of what he’d seen during his two decades with the bank. And it asked him some unusual questions, like if he had international accounts.

Taber Andrew Bain / Flickr - CC

As V-E Day approaches, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Rick Atkinson discusses the lasting impact and significance of World War II. Then, many consumers remain wary of check-cashing and payday-lending businesses. We speak with a professor of city planning who worked as a check casher in New York City to research the industry and find out why low- and middle-income Americans are using them in increasing numbers.

The financial ripples from Britain's decision to leave the European Union were felt  on this side of the pond, leaving plenty of Americans wondering how the departure affects their monetary plans. While many details surrounding the split remain up in the air, Up To Date's Smart Money Experts have sage advice to keep skittish savers grounded.

Guests:

Pixabay--CC

The prepaid debit cards Kansas and Missouri use to pay state employees without bank accounts got a thumbs-down this week from a consumer advocacy group.

“Most cards don’t charge you if you want to find the balance is on your card,” says Lauren Saunders of the National Consumer Law Center, “but the Kansas card, if you go up to the ATM and ask what the balance is, they’re going to charge you a dollar.”

Do you know what the Export-Import Bank of The United States does? On this edition of Up To Date, guest host Stephen Steigman discusses the role of the bank and why it matters in Kansas City.

Guest: 

  • Fred Hochberg is the Chairman and President of the Export-Import Bank of the United States. 

The Effects of Restricting Payday Lending

Sep 20, 2011
Andrea Silenzi

Payday loan shops provide small, short-term loans. A typical loan ranges in size from $100 to $500, and must be repaid within two weeks. The industry contends that such loans help people pay for unforeseen expenses.

But many people believe that such loans are harmful because of the amount of interest charged. In the state of Missouri, the average APR on payday loans is above 400%.

Octogenarian Admits To Bank Heist

Jun 7, 2010

Kansas City, Mo. – The lure of bank robbery, apparently, knows no age restrictions. An 80-year-old Kansas City man today admitted his crime.

Retired railroad engineer Augusta Cannon told a U.S. District Judge he went to UMB Bank at 103rd and Stateline Road three days before Christmas last year. He held a pellet gun on a teller, demanded money and got nearly $9,000.

Kansas City – House Financial Services Committee Chairman Barney Frank was in Kansas City at the behest of his colleague on the committee, Congressman Emanuel Cleaver, to recognize UMB Bank and Commerce as the second and third most healthy banks in the country. This is according to ratings published by Forbes Magazine. Frank said institutions like UMB and Commerce have nothing to fear from bank reforms.