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Segment 1: The woman who coined 'white fragility' unpacks the meaning of the term.

Robin DiAngelo first started noticing what she now calls 'white fragility' about twenty years ago, when she worked alongside people of color as a diversity trainer. The resulting research culminated in a book that's been a New York Times Bestseller for more than a year. It's also elicited death threats.

Segment 1: Three journalists based in Washington speak to the unique challenges of covering national politics up close.

Each day brings something exciting and newsworthy in Washington, D.C., whether it's an impeachment inquiry or a new health care policy. Three journalists spoke about navigating the political web of the Capitol, the "glorified stalking" of politicians for quotes, and the sheer enormity of working in the nation's hub for political decision-making. 

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Segment 1: Policymakers have yet to grasp the depth of the recession in farm country.

Farmers are slowly losing their livelihood as the input costs of farming rise and the price of commodoties sink. We talked with Paul Johnson, a grower and policy analyst, about the crisis in farm country. "There's not much, if any, of a debate of a farm and food discussion that we need in Kansas," Johnson said.

'Big Sonia'; Changing Your Mind

Nov 30, 2017

Sonia Warshawski is a Holocaust survivor who ran a tailor shop in Metcalf South Mall. A documentary about her life is in theaters now. What does this survivor story mean to a younger generation?

Plus: On KCUR's Central Standard, we're examining what it takes to change someone's mind. We talk to a local man, who tells us about leaving the religious sect in which he was raised.

Guests:

Dierk Schaefer / Flickr - CC

You used to hate apples, but now you love them. We change our minds on many different things, but what about when it comes to politics — especially when things are so polarized? We explore why it's so hard to change our minds.

Guests:

Sgt. Alicia Brand / U.S. Army

Few chemical reactions are as complicated to humans the one that elicits the feeling of love. Today, we learn about a psychobiological approach to couples therapy. Then, we discuss how racial tensions have changed in America during the Trump administration, and find out how last weekend's tragedy in Charlottesville, Virginia, has affected leaders of Kansas City's diverse communities.

Why is it the person we were head over heels for just a few months ago now seems a bit ... boring? Clinician and researcher Stan Tatkin says our brains are wired to kick into auto-pilot after a while, but it doesn't have to mean the end of the relationship.

Harvard-trained Dr. Jill Bolte Taylor studied schizophrenia and severe mental illnesses. Then, in 1996, she suffered a severe stroke that left her unable to walk, talk, read, write, or recall any of her life. Over the course of eight years she recovered and in this conversation with Steve Kraske, reveals what that experience taught her.

Creative Commons

Remember the last time you had a mosquito bite, an allergy ridden nose, or a rash. The sensation that makes these small ailments torments is the desire to itch and experience that sweet relief following the act of scratching.

But much of what we experience when we feel an urge to itch is actually deep in the brain. On Wednesday's Central Standard we'll look at the science of itching and take a look into the the pain and mystery behind migraine headaches.

Boosting Brain Fitness

Oct 16, 2012
John A. Beal

It’s not just your abs that need a regular workout— it’s essential for your brain too. But how do you pump iron with your noodle?

Would you be able to recognize the symptoms of a stroke? If you can, you may be able to save someone’s life.

The brains of people who grow up speaking two languages are wired differently, and those differences protect them from dementia as they age.

That's the news from two studies out this month from a scientist in Canada who has spent decades trying to figure out whether being bilingual is bad or good. "I've been doing this for 25 years," Ellen Bialystok, a distinguished research professor of psychology at York University in Toronto, tells Shots. "Suddenly people are interested. I figure it's because everybody's scared about dementia."