bullying | KCUR

bullying

Segment 1: State task force on bullying looks to multiple stakeholders for information on harmful harassing behavior 

The Kansas Department of Education has brought together educators, legislators, students and others to garner recommendations as part of its efforts "to better understand how to combat" bullying. The co-chair of the task force discussed how big the problem is, the impact of technology as a means of bullying and why application of the state policies on bullying may not be applied equally by school districts across Kansas.    

Segment 1: The way we remember Emmett Till is still rooted in race and geography.

A KU professor who thought he knew the Emmett Till story was shocked by what he learned when he traveled to the Mississippi Delta for himself. That sent him on a journey to try to sort through the tangled threads of this haunting history. 

Segment 2: Men and boys in ballet speak out.

Chris Neal / For the Kansas News Service

TOPEKA — Bullying just won’t go away. If anything, the advent of smartphones and social media has made it worse.

That’s forced a conversation on what Kansas schools can do to help. The problem? It’s easier to get adults to weigh in than students.

Segment 1: How a 1990s movie on DVD saved the life of a queer Kansas teen.

Savannah Rodgers is making a documentary about her obsession, as a 12-year-old, with the movie Chasing Amy.

Carroll family

Cristi Carroll remembers the discussion she had with the first of three orthodontists about braces for her daughter, Alex, now 14.

“I was shocked at the cost,” she says. “I can’t remember the total dollars, but I remember them saying it would be $250 a month for two years. That’s a car payment. I’m a single mom.”

A bill in the Kansas Legislature would let students escape bullying by transferring to a new school, either public or private.

But critics say the bill is little more than an attempt to send state dollars meant for public schools to private alternatives.

Paul Andrews / paulandrewsphotography.com

In the 1950s, SuEllen Fried got a call asking if she'd like to teach the cha-cha to psychiatric patients at the Osawatomie State Hospital.

She'd danced in St. Louis's Muny Opera as a teen and she'd made plans to move to New York to pursue a career in dance on Broadway. But at the last minute, she fell in love, moved to Kansas City, got married and started a family instead.

Portrait Session With SuEllen Fried

Jan 18, 2019

SuEllen Fried wanted to dance. She never anticipated this passion would lead her to a life of advocacy for child-abuse prevention and prison reform.

By working with patients through dance therapy, she developed a focus on bullying in early childhood. She has co-authored three books on the subject and travels around the nation advocating practical steps in prevention and promoting awareness. This hour-long interview is the latest installment in our Portrait Session series.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

The Lee’s Summit R-7 school board is considering a plan that moves about 800 of the district’s 18,000 students to different schools next year.

Conversations about school boundary changes are always fraught. When schools are overcrowded and someone has to move, no one wants it to be their kid.

So tensions were already high when race and equity became part of the discussion.

Greg Echlin / KCUR 89.3 file photo

The Kansas City Chiefs are ranked No. 1 in the AFC West and come in at No. 4 in the just-released NFL power rankings. Chiefs fans are feeling proud.

But there’s also bullying. Not just by former star running back Kareem Hunt, who was released by the team after video showed him kicking and pushing a woman in a Cleveland hotel in February, but also of an entire minority group.

Segment 1: Celebrities are entertaining and increasingly political.

Recently more and more celebrities are getting involved in political activism, but it has not always been this way. We talk about the origin of celebrity influence in politics and its effects in today's political climate.

Segment 2, beginning at 14:10: What's in a name?

Google Street View

A black middle school student, who reported a sexual and physical assault, is at the center of a federal lawsuit claiming Lansing Middle School officials failed to deal with the issue properly because of his race. 

The lawsuit, filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Kansas City, Kansas, stems from a February 6 incident when the Lansing Middle School student was allegedly verbally and physically attacked by another student — who, the lawsuit points out, is white.

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

Jeff Sloan knew something was wrong as soon as his 10-year-old son got off the school bus.

Jayden, a fourth grader at Mason Elementary in Lee’s Summit, was limping slightly – and there was something wrong with his speech.

“He’s talking like his tongue’s tied, and he’s telling me, ‘I’ve had the worst day, Dad. It’s just been terrible,’” Jeff says. “I said, ‘So what happened? Why are you talking like that?’ And he goes, ‘I bit my tongue.’”

Netflix

The Netflix series 13 Reasons Why has received praise and criticism for how it approaches weighty topics such as teen bullying, sexuality, mental illness and suicide. Today we speak with psychologist Wes Crenshaw, who says the drama can encourage important discussions between parents and their children.

Are we a society of bullies? We talk to two sociologists who make the case we can’t fix bullying in schools until we take a close look at the bigger institutional factors in America that encourage it.

Guests:

essentialeducator.org --CC

The mother of a boy who was severely beaten in a Liberty, Missouri middle school lunchroom in February said she’d written to the school a month earlier — telling administrators her son was being picked on.

Blake Kitchen has Asperger’s Syndrome and as part of his condition, he likes routine. For example, he likes eating in the same spot in the lunchroom each day. When Blake put his tray down in that spot, an older student allegedly beat him so badly he ended up in the hospital with a broken skull and jaw.

In the wake of a bullying incident that sent a 12-year-old to the hospital for five days in the Liberty School District, we get perspectives on bullying from administrators, parents and former students, all in an effort to figure out what can and should be done to keep kids safe.

 

Guests:

http://www.tedxkc.org

In her new documentary, Mentor, filmmaker Alix Lambert examines the culture of bullying at an Ohio high school and two of its victims who committed suicide.  Bullying will also be the focus of her presentation at this week's TEDxKC speakers series.

In this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske talks with Lambert about 'bystander culture' and what draws her to individuals who are non-conforming.

The Problem Of Adult Bullying

Nov 13, 2013

In light of the recent NFL bullying scandal where Richie Incognito's inappropriate locker room behavior landed him in the national spotlight, we explore the reality of adult bullying.

We talk about how prevalent adult bullying is, as well as how important it is for managers and supervisors to enforce anti-bullying policies in their workplaces. 

Guests:

Village of Niles / Google Images -- CC

Sexual assault used to be such a taboo issue that it wasn’t even covered by the media. Those affected by sexual assault would often hide in shame, but as it has becomes more public, young people are flocking to their Facebook and Twitter accounts to call names and take sides.

KU Researchers Developing Model Anti-Bullying Policy

Aug 19, 2013

Researchers at the University of Kansas have been hired by the State Department of Education to develop a model anti-bullying policy for use in schools statewide.

All Kansas schools must have an anti-bullying policy, but coming up with effective policies and practices to meet that requirement can get complicated. Researchers at the University of Kansas plan to launch a statewide series of meetings in October to present educators with a model policy to build their own programs around.

Bullying Ordinance Puts Onus On Parents

Jul 31, 2013

A city council committee has endorsed an ordinance that would outlaw bullying throughout Kansas City, Missouri. As with the city's youth curfew, the onus falls on parents.

The 14 school districts in the city already have policies to protect students from being bullied, as is required by Missouri law.

The problem, says Councilman Scott Taylor, is that school districts' anti-bullying policies are only enforceable on school property. And bullying is not confined to school grounds, especially in the age of the Internet, where online humiliations have even led to suicides.

It's become all too common: kids bullying other kids.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Lots of kids get bullied. But kids with autism are especially vulnerable.

A new survey by the Interactive Autism Network found that nearly two-thirds of children with autism spectrum disorders have been bullied at some point. And it found that these kids are three times as likely as typical kids to have been bullied in the past month.

A daily digest of headlines from KCUR:

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  • New Play Tackles Bullying and Disability

photo: Steve Walker/KCUR

Schools across the country are grappling with how to address bullying, a problem that's provoked some teenagers to suicide.

Two area theaters for young audiences are staging plays about bullying this month, and in the case of a new play at Theatre for Young America, specifically tackling bullying against the disabled with a disabled actor in its cast.

Fresh Way of Addressing Bullying