Central Standard | KCUR

Central Standard

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Segment 1: What we know about COVID-19, and what we don't

A lot is unknown about the novel coronavirus currently circulating the globe, giving rise to myths about how it spreads, how to keep it from spreading and how to reduce one's chances of getting infected. We asked an infectious disease specialist to clear up some common misconceptions.

Sharon McCutcheon / Unsplash

Segment 1: Tips for talking to children about the ongoing crisis.

Parents are under a lot of pressure these days as their kids ask questions about this new world they're living in. It's a lot of change all at once. But respect, honesty and understanding can go a long way when broaching the subject with young minds.

Matthew Ansley / Unsplash

Segment 1: Public defenders are calling prisons during pandemic ticking time bombs

In light of the ongoing COVID-19 scare, individual correctional facilities in Kansas and Missouri have decided to release certain prisoners, but public defenders and advocates say a statewide approach is needed to avoid a crisis behind bars.

Engin Akyur / Unsplash

Segment 1: Health care workers continue to work in unsafe environments.

A lack of protective gear and the silent nature of COVID-19 are just two new concerns piled on top of existing ones Kansas City health care providers deal with during the pandemic. Many are already coming to terms with the idea they will likely contract the virus.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: "No one is immune" to the effects of the coronavirus pandemic, said Mayor Carson Ross.

The spread of the new coronavirus has already delayed local elections in Blue Springs, Missouri, but the full extent of the damage is yet to be known. It will undoubtedly include hits to public health, residents' wallets, tax revenue and more, says the suburb's mayor.

Chelsea Engstrom / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: How the coronavirus pandemic is affecting the least fortunate among us.

One advocate for people experiencing homelessness says that population is always in crisis. When you add a worldwide pandemic to the mix, the stakes are even higher for them and the organizations that work to provide them the resources to survive.

C.J. Janovy / KCUR 89.3 file photo

Segment 1: North Kansas City responds to the coronavirus pandemic.

An immediate concern for this Northland municipality is warm weather attracting still too many people to public parks. In the medium- and long-term, local businesses will be hit hard — a revenue loss that will undoubtedly make a dent in the small city's budget.

Nomin Ujiyediin / Kansas News Service

Segment 1: Adapting Kansas counties, businesses, schools and employees to coronavirus

Gov. Laura Kelly has signed a series of executive orders aimed at safeguarding the health of Kansans during the COVID-19 pandemic. We asked her about criticism that the measures went too far, and whether she’s considering a statewide stay-at-home order.

Center School District / Facebook

Segment 1: Kansas City, Kansas, family stuck in Peru

His wife and daughter have been in Lima, Peru, since January, and Brian Copeland felt like spending some vacation time hanging out with them there. He didn't expect he'd end up spending weeks on lockdown in a three-bedroom apartment with six other people.

  • Brian Copeland, Kansas City, Kansas, resident

Segment 2, beginning at 15:59: Kansas public schools, in the days of coronavirus

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Coronavirus response in Wyandotte County

The Unified Government, representing one of the most diverse counties in Kansas and Missouri, faces some particular challenges in the face of the coronavirus pandemic. Mayor/CEO Alvey acknowledged communication is a problem for his administration, but is proud of efforts to translate safety materials for the Spanish-speaking community. The mayor also discussed the stay at home order that went into effect yesterday, the economic hit to be sustained because of it and what happens in a post-pandemic recovery.

Harvesters

Segment 1: Wife's Facebook post seen by hundreds meant one more hospital visit with her husband before he died

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1, beginning at 4:12: Current Washington debates revolve around who should get a bailout due to the COVID-19 crisis.

The Raven Book Store / Facebook

To try to prevent the spread of COVID-19, most arts organizations in metro Kansas City have canceled performances or closed, at least temporarily. That's hitting revenue streams pretty hard, including independent artists who rely on crowds or personal contact to make their money.

“It’s an incredibly tough time,” said Maite Salazar, a poet and writer.

Courtesy of Kady McMaster

Segment 1: "I'm going to continue to work really hard, I'm just going to do it from home," said U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids.

Despite deciding to self-quarantine after potential exposure to the novel coronavirus, Kansas' U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids said she's still working to ensure any stimulus package out of the Capitol prioritizes people who need it most. She also emphasized the importance of practicing social distancing, listening to public health officials and taking the coronavirus situation seriously.

File photo by Lisa Rodriguez / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: What Washington lawmakers are working on in response to the spread of COVID-19.

The federal response to the spread of coronavirus had "a clunky start," said Missouri's senior U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt. Since then federal decision-makers have enabled state leaders, he said, and Missouri Gov. Mike Parson has enabled county and local leaders to get things done.

Coronavirus Q&A: Is It Safe To Go To The Bank?

Mar 20, 2020
Curology / Unsplash

Answers to coronavirus questions, and resources available in the Kansas City area

As part of special coverage of the novel coronavirus, KCUR opened the phone lines to answer your questions. From hospital preparedness to mental health to where to find social services, our panel of experts fielded questions from around the metro, including one senior who wanted to know if the drive-thru at the bank could put her at risk.

Steinar Engeland / Unsplash

Segment 1: How sports journalists are adapting to a lack of sporting events.

The coronavirus has proven to be a huge disruption in the world of athletics. Aside from professional teams suspending seasons (to the dismay of thousands), sports journalists are also facing a major shift in how they find and report stories.

Courtesy of Kady McMaster

Segment 1: "I'm going to continue to work really hard, I'm just going to do it from home," said U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids.

Despite deciding to self-quarantine after potential exposure to the novel coronavirus, Kansas' U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids said she's still working to ensure any stimulus package out of the Capitol prioritizes people who need it most. She also emphasized the importance of practicing social distancing, listening to public health officials and taking the coronavirus situation seriously.

File photo by Lisa Rodriguez / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: What Washington lawmakers are working on in response to the spread of COVID-19.

The federal response to the spread of coronavirus had "a clunky start," said Missouri's senior U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt. Since then federal decision-makers have enabled state leaders, he said, and Missouri Gov. Mike Parson has enabled county and local leaders to get things done.

The Coronavirus Q&A, Is It Safe To Go To The Bank?

Mar 18, 2020
Curology / Unsplash

Panelists answered questions regarding the coronavirus and the resources available in the Kansas City area to diagnose and treat.

As part of special coverage of the novel coronavirus, KCUR 89.3 opened the phone lines to answer your questions. From hospital preparedness to mental health to where to find social services, our panel of experts fielded questions from around the metro including one senior in need of cash who wanted to know if even the drive-through at the bank could put her at risk.  

Steinar Engeland / Unsplash

Segment 1: How sports journalists are adapting to a lack of sporting events.

The coronavirus has proven to be a huge disruption in the world of athletics. Aside from professional teams suspending seasons (to the dismay of thousands), sports journalists are also facing a major shift in how they find and report stories.

DimitrI Karastelev / Unsplash

AUDIO FROM THIS BROADCAST IS NOT AVAILABLE

Segment 1: Understanding the basics of what a virus is

With the increase in COVID-19 cases in this country, questions are swirling around the novel coronavirus. We thought this a good time for a Virology 101 primer. Gene Olinger described how viruses work, why they like humans, and why it is difficult to kill a virus once it enters our bodies.

Segment 1: Rye's Megan Garrelts is a semi-finalist for a James Beard Award for Outstanding Pastry Chef. 

While some pastry chefs make a name for themselves for crazy concoctions, a significant portion of Garrelts' success is the result of elevating standbys like pies and cinnamon rolls.

Segment 1: Can we really expect people to stay home from work when they're sick if they don't get paid sick leave?

In Missouri and Kansas, employers are not required to provide sick leave. What does that mean as we watch the coronavirus spread and workers are told to self-quarantine? 

Segment 1: How voters are feeling the day after the 2020 Missouri Democratic Primary.

Yesterday’s primary in Missouri and several other states may have been a turning point in the selection of a democratic nominee, but how we're feeling is a mixed bag. Here's just a sampling of what people expressed: disappointed, excited, frustrated, and indifferent.

  • Beth Vonnahme, associate professor of political science, UMKC

Segment 2, beginning at 19:40: Looking back at great men with the men who looked up to them.

Segment 1: In 1990, Deanna Dikeman took a photo of her parents waving goodbye to her as she drove away.

She continued to take these pictures for decades and today, what started as random keepsakes is now a series of photos spanning through her father’s death until her mother passed away. Since releasing “Leaving and Waving,” she has also received comments from people who can see moments from their own lives, reflected in hers.

Segment 1: Inequality in the story of lead contamination and lead removal.

Homes in Kansas City's oldest and one-time affluent neighborhoods are now lived in by people without the resources to remove the lead paint commonly used before its dangers were known. Plus, how the rise and fall of lead mining has affected a part of Missouri known as the Lead Belt. 

Multicultural Business Coalition of Kansas City

Kansas City is becoming more welcoming for black women who want to start their own businesses.

Adrienne Haynes, the managing partner at the business law firm SEED Law, says there’s more diversity in the entrepreneurial community today than in 2015, when she created the Multicultural Business Coalition with a few other organizations. Half of her clients are black women.

Segment 1: What if instead of the Confederate flag, the symbol of the Civil War was a worn out dish rag?

The current exhibit at H&R Block Artspace is about the little-known Confederate Flag of Truce, a dish towel used by Confederate forces to surrender the Civil War in Virginia in 1865. It's a counterweight to the more controversial Confederate flag, seen by many as a symbol of racism.

Less than a week before the Missouri preisdential primaries, on the day that the Democratic field narrowed to a final two candidates, Kansas City area voters under 25 years old shared their journeys watching the process unfold so far. What are the issues that matter to them the most, and why? What do the candidates look like through that lens? Our roundtable includes two democrats, one republican, and two unaffiliated voters. A political science professor adds context to the young people's stories at the end of the hour.

Guests:

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