Digital Post | KCUR

Digital Post

Crysta Henthorne / Kansas News Service

Aging out into problems

A new report from the Annie E. Casey Foundation looking at what happens to older children in foster care shows Kansas roughly follows national trends — and paints a bleak picture for their entry into adulthood.

Some things stand out in Kansas:

Laura Spencer / KCUR 89.3

The Writers Place is pulling up stakes from the Valentine neighborhood. 

Since 1992, a castle-like house at 3607 Pennsylvania has served as a "literary community center," home to countless poetry readings, workshops and art exhibitions. The non-profit organization headquartered there plans to relocate to a small office inside The Nonprofit Village, a co-working space at 31 W. 31st Street, in December.

Crysta Henthorne / Kansas News Service

Revving up revenues

Remember the tax cuts engineered by then-Gov. Sam Brownback? And recall how those tax cuts were followed, month after month and year after year by state tax revenue shortfalls?

Turns out their impact was underestimated all the time. And so the reversal of those tax cuts means more money than lawmakers had bargained on.

Stephen Koranda tells us that a new report raises the state’s projected tax collections for the current budget year by $300 million, about 4.5 percent.

It’s likely you’ve never heard of John Lewis Barkley.

The Missouri native fought in World War I, winning the Congressional Medal of Honor and later writing a book about his experience. Yet his book, “No Hard Feelings!” and his name remain in relative obscurity, even as the nation marks the 100th anniversary of World War I’s end.

That surprises Steven Trout, who helped get the book reprinted under the title “Scarlet Fields” in 2014.

“I’m astonished, in fact, and I don’t really know the reason,” he told St. Louis Public Radio.

StoryCorps

StoryCorps' MobileBooth came to Kansas City to collect the stories and memories of residents. This is one in a series of stories KCUR has chosen to highlight.

Samantha Ruggles came out as a transgender woman long after her grandparents and parents had passed away.

"If they were still alive, how would that conversation have gone? Your coming out?" her friend Darin Challacombe asked.

Corner Cafe

With the recent closing of Chubby's on Broadway, Kansas City lost one of its iconic diners. But the metro has plenty of other places where people can satisfy late-night cravings or load up on breakfast standards.

This week on Central Standard, our food critics recommended their favorite places for consistent home-style cooking and the pleasures of comfort food.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

A few days after the election, Kansas' next governor is beginning to spell out what she'll do in office. 

On Thursday, governor-elect Laura Kelly said she'd reinstate an executive order to protect LGBTQ state workers from discrimination. The order was first put in place by then-Gov. Kathleen Sebelius in 2007, but that was rescinded in 2015 by then-Gov. Sam Brownback.

Marilyn Maye

To be human is to pretend.

If you don’t pretend enough, life can seem boring. But pretend too much and you might get hauled away for fraud – which definitely isn’t dull, but what a hassle.

So try pretending just the right amount at weekend events that will let you make-believe without the risk of mayhem. Well, not much. Uh, let’s pretend I didn’t say that.

1. Marilyn Maye with Kansas City Jazz Orchestra

Madeline Fox / Kansas News Service

A race that looked to be oh-so-close turned out to be a clear victory for Democrat Laura Kelly, the new governor-elect of Kansas.

On this mini episode of “My Fellow Kansans” we hear what Kelly had to say on election night and her explanation of what vaulted her to victory over Republican Secretary of State and conservative firebrand Kris Kobach. 

Big Stock

A Kansas law prohibiting drug-induced abortions via telemedicine is being challenged by a women’s health clinic in Wichita that provides abortions.

Trust Women Wichita on Thursday filed a lawsuit seeking to block the law from taking effect on Jan. 1.

“Our mission as an organization is to provide reproductive health care to people in the state of Kansas and elsewhere, and to provide that care to underserved communities,” said Julie Burkhart, founder and CEO of Trust Women Wichita.

For the first time in seven years, rural America’s population is growing.

The annual U.S. Department of Agriculture report “Rural America at a Glance” found the increase — only 0.08 percent — mainly in scenic rural areas like the Rocky Mountains, more densely populated rural areas and rural communities that are within about an hour’s drive of a major city. Essentially, places where people still have access to urban amenities or can go hiking, biking, fishing or skiing.

Crysta Henthorne / Kansas News Service

Worse in Kansas

The foster care load in Kansas is growing faster than the rest of the country. Madeline Fox analyzed fresh national numbers on trends in children put into state custody and found that things are getting worse faster here than elsewhere.

Kevin Collison / CityScene KC

Folk Alliance International dedicated a new home in the Crossroads Arts District Thursday and the music organization was welcomed by Mayor Sly James for its contribution to Kansas City’s cultural scene.

“We appreciate the rich artistic and cultural history of this city,” the mayor said. “One of the great things to happen is the Folk Alliance.”

Folk Alliance International relocated to Kansas City from Memphis in 2013. 

Bingham-Waggoner Historical Society

Every November and December, Kansas Citians join the nation in a scramble to decorate for the holidays. When those same old decorations start feeling, well, old, locals know to hit the holiday homes tour circuit for fresh ideas.

HCA Midwest Health

Seven of 20 Kansas City area hospitals got A’s in patient safety, according to a new report, while nine got B’s and four got C’s.

The grades were assigned by The Leapfrog Group, a nonprofit that twice a year rates 2,600 general acute-care hospitals across the country on patient safety measures.

Rebekah Hange / KCUR 89.3 file photo

Bill James is uniquely poised to enjoy major league baseball — more so than possibly any other fan. 

“It’s true of anything, that the more you know about it, the more you understand it, the better position you’re in to enjoy it,” James told host Gina Kaufmann on Thursday on KCUR’s Central Standard.

And the Kansas native knows a lot about the game. In the late 1970s, he invented a field of baseball analysis he named sabermetrics after the acronym SABR (Society for American Baseball Research).

State Auditor Nicole Galloway defeated Republican Saundra McDowell to be the only Democrat holding a statewide office.

“To me what this election says is that folks believe in accountability,” Galloway said after her victory Tuesday. “They believe that Jefferson City needs someone that will call the balls and strikes and call out corruption when it happens and hold those accountable for their actions.”

Crysta Henthorne / Kansas News Service

Kansas is America

Laura Kelly is the latest Democratic governor-elect of Kansas. She portrayed her win Tuesday as a victory for bipartisanship and an eagerness for civility in the state. After all, Kris Kobach represented, in his words, “full-throttled” conservatism engaged in “intellectual combat.”

Sam Zeff / KCUR 89.3

Six months ago, very few people in the Kansas 3rd Congressional District even knew Sharice Davids’ name. Now she has made history. Davids is the first openly gay representative in Kansas history. She joins Deb Haaland from New Mexico as the first Native American women in the House.

"We have a chance to reset expectations when people look at Kansas," Davids said to a room full of cheering supporters. "I knew we could do better and we just did."

Missouri Midterm Elections Results 2018

Nov 6, 2018
Crysta Henthorne / KCUR 89.3

Tuesday's general election in Missouri decided one of the most closely watched U.S. Senate races in the country. Missouri voters also were asked whether they want to raise the minimum wage, pay a higher gas tax, reform redistricting and ethics for state government and legalize medical marijuana.

NPR's Live Election Blog

Nov 6, 2018
NPR

Follow live coverage of the 2018 midterm elections, including results and analysis. Get caught up on the latest news.

Chris Haxel / KCUR 89.3

A lengthy ballot, broken machines, address mix-ups and confusion over showing photo IDs slowed lines at Missouri polling places Tuesday, leading to waits of up to an hour for voters revved up by the contentious midterm election.

Missouri Department of Corrections

The U.S. Supreme Court hears oral arguments Tuesday in the case of a Missouri death row inmate who suffers from a rare disease and claims the state’s plan to execute him by lethal injection violates the Constitution’s ban on cruel and unusual punishment.

Russell Bucklew contends the process could cause ruptures of tumors in his head, throat and neck and result in excruciating pain.

Free Hot Soup Facebook page

Depending on whom you ask, health department officials on Sunday either stopped an unlicensed group from illegally handing out potentially bacteria-ridden food or destroyed the property of some “friends” having a “picnic.”

According to official documents, the Kansas City Health Department stopped volunteers of Free Hot Soup Kansas City from handing out food at several Kansas City parks because they lacked the required food handling permits. The food was seized and discarded or was destroyed with bleach.

Creative Commons

Nearly six months after ordering a cult leader and his group to pay almost $8 million in damages to a woman they’d effectively enslaved for 10 years, a federal judge has ordered the cult leader's arrest.

Royall Jenkins was the founder and leader of The Value Creators Inc., formerly known as The United Nation of Islam. On Friday, U.S. District Judge Daniel Crabtree issued a bench warrant for his arrest after finding that Jenkins had ignored numerous court orders.

Crysta Henthorne / Kansas News Service

Waiting for Godot, um, JoCo

The Kansas county with the most voters and the most money has also made its name as the state’s election night slowpoke.

Johnson County results have come in reaaaaaaally slowly in recent years.

When it happened in the last election cycle, county elections boss Ronnie Metsker blamed old machines. After the county spent big on new machines, Johnson County was again the last place to report its results in the August primary. An Omaha-based elections software company took the blame.

Kansas News Service/FILE PHOTO

We’ve nearly arrived at a pivotal moment — the election that will determine whether Kansas continues rightward, returns to its traditional center, or starts down a new path. My Fellow Kansans, a podcast from the Kansas News Service, has been charting how we got here and what’s at stake in Tuesday’s voting. 

Nearly 30 years ago, the anti-abortion protests of the 1991 Summer of Mercy in Wichita energized conservatives and paved the way for the rise of Sam Brownback. As a U.S. senator, Brownback embodied the Christian right. But as governor, tax cuts headlined his red state agenda.

The polls in Missouri will be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday. There’s been a lot to keep up on a national and international level, so if you don’t feel quite as informed as you’d like about what’s on Missouri’s ballot, don’t fret.

The following is a rundown of the state’s biggest races — especially that contentious U.S. Senate contest between incumbent Democrat Claire McCaskill and Republican Attorney General Josh Hawley — plus a breakdown of several major issues that voters will be asked to decide.

Courtesy of J. Anthony Snorgrass

A poet and playwright is working to preserve the legacy of an iconic leader in the black community of Liberty, Missouri.

The poet and playwright is Shelton Ponder, a lifelong Liberty resident who graduated from Liberty High School in 1961.

Kyle Palmer / KCUR 89.3

Saturday morning Shabbat at Congregation Beth Torah in Overland Park typically draws about 30 worshippers. But this Saturday saw a crowd at least four times that number show up, drawn to this white stone synagogue along 127th Street wanting to show solidarity against hate and anti-Semitism.

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