dyslexia | KCUR

dyslexia

Crysta Henthorne / Kansas News Service

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Parents of dyslexic children have long pitched for a dramatic change to reading instruction and the extra teaching help needed to accommodate brains wired a little differently.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen weighs in this week with a story about how they’re on the verge of a breakthrough in Kansas that could bring more phonics-grounded reading instruction for all kids.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / KCUR/Kansas News Service

Angie Schreiber sees it time and again: dyslexic students failing to learn to read through traditional teaching techniques.

But she says she knows how they can flourish.

Schreiber’s private teaching service in Emporia uses an approach known as structured literacy. The method drills students on myriad rules of English sound and spelling that most of us never learned consciously.

Dyslexia affects nearly 20 percent of the population, effecting their ability to learn in the same way as the rest of the population. But, many individuals never get diagnosed.

On this episode of Central Standard we explore the science behind dyslexia, signs that you or a loved one may have this brain difference and how the proper accommodations and assistance can turn dyslexia into a life long asset.

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For people with dyslexia, problems recognizing words can make life difficult. Children usually aren't diagnosed until elementary school, when it becomes clear they're struggling with reading. But scientists say it could be possible to diagnose and help kids much earlier by identifying problems with visual attention — long before they learn to read.