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engineering

Burns and McDonnell

Saying it will hire around 1,200 employees this year, Burns & McDonnell announced that it is beginning work on a $42 million expansion of its Kansas City headquarters campus, the Kansas City Business Journal reports.

The several waterways that weave through Kansas City make a big impact on shaping The Metro. Especially after heavy rains. On this episode, we learn how flooding shaped our city.

Guests:

Anne Kniggendorf

What does your grandfather’s house have in common with the Johnson County library? A workshop.

“I’m not saying this is your grandad’s basement — it’s kind of your grandad’s basement on steroids,” Johnson County Library Director Sean Casserley said during a recent event to rededicate the Black & Veatch MakerSpace. The Overland Park-based engineering firm renewed a $90,000, three-year grant to the library system in July.

As school winds down, one question always comes to most people's minds: what did you do this summer? On today's show, we speak with students and teachers who spent their summer doing surprising things like helping clean water efforts in South Africa or creating a campaign strategy. Oh, and winning "Jeopardy!"

  • Luciana De Anda, student, Olathe East High School
  • John Kevern, professor, UMKC School of Computing and Engineering
  • Larry Martin, teacher, Belinder Elementary

Segment 1: Besides being a fad, tiny houses can also help in the instance of a natural disaster.

Often the talk surrounding "tiny houses" is focused on cutting costs but their design can also help aid housing crises after a natural disaster.

Michelle Tyrene Johnson / KCUR 89.3

Buzzing outside Flarsheim Hall on the grounds of the University of Missouri-Kansas City campus Friday morning sounded like a scourge of mosquitoes.

The drone demonstration outside the School of Computing and Engineering was intended to help university leaders announce that the Department of Defense’s Office of Naval Research had awarded the university a $7.2 million grant and a $7.7 million contract to develop countermeasures to drone threats.

The funding is the largest federal amount received by UMKC for non-health related research.

Allan Warren / Wikimedia Commons

Today, we speak with a University of Kansas student who won an international competition focused on designing a spacecraft capable of reaching Mars and returning to Earth.

Then: James Baldwin's legacy still resonates with today's thinkers on race in Kansas City. We discuss how his ideas still relate with the current social climate.

Guests:

Elle Moxley / KCUR 89.3

“Let’s go divas, let’s go!” the girls chant, before dissolving into giggles.

On the last day of a Kansas City Public Schools-sponsored summer camp, students cheer on their friends in an engineering challenge.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

For all the times that scientific research has improved our lives, there are other times when science got it horribly wrong. Today, Dr. Paul Offit describes the lessons we have learned, and should be learning, to separate good science from bad.

Peggy Lowe / KCUR 89.3

Looking back, Mira Mdivani says she can now connect the events and put them in context.

“Before the shooting, actually,” she says, “I had a phone call from an Indian national who emigrated to the United States and is a United States citizen.”

Mdivani, an immigration attorney in Overland Park, Kansas, was recalling the Feb. 22 shooting at an Olathe bar in which two Indian men were targeted in what appears to have been a racially motivated attack.

Wikimedia Commons

In this encore presentation of Central Standard: What does it mean to be a "Renaissance Man" today? Hint: it's more than being an expert multi-tasker. 

Guests:

You may not have heard of Octave Chanute before but, if you live in or around Kansas City, chances are you're affected by his work. Local historian Bill Nicks explains Chanute's lasting importance to aviation, and where you can still find evidence of his legacy in the metro.

KCPT Television / Heartland Health Monitor

The University of Missouri-Kansas City is a diverse, urban institution with around 1,200 full- and part-time faculty dispersed across dozens of academic areas.

As multifaceted as it is, academicians from the disparate fields of fine arts and medicine have found their way to Associate Professor Greg King in the School of Computing and Engineering.

Creative Commons

What does it mean to be a "Renaissance Man" today? Hint: it's more than being an expert multi-tasker. 

Guests:

courtesy: Burns & McDonnell

Greg Graves announced plans last week to retire at the end of 2016 as president and CEO of Burns & McDonnell, a Kansas City-based engineering firm. It was a role he'd served for 12 years.

And, on Monday, Graves had a follow-up announcement for the employee-owners: Ray Kowalik will succeed him as CEO.