Ethics Professors | KCUR

Ethics Professors

Segment 1: Young adults are making life decisions with their carbon footprints top of mind.

From your morning ablutions to your night on the town, every action you take these days impacts the amount of carbon in the atmosphere. Young people are acutely aware of this, and it's changing the day-to-day and long-term decisions they make in life.

Segment 1: A "dark store theory" update

The Kansas Board of Tax Appeals handed Johnson County a defeat last month when they ruled the county has overcharged some Walmart stores millions of dollars in property taxes. The decision is based on something called the "dark store theory," and it could put homeowners on the hook for making up the county's lost revenue.

Segment 1: USDA research facilities will relocate to Kansas City area.

The headquarters of the Economic Research Service and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture will soon move to Kansas City. We discussed the news with the Kansas City Area Development Council and heard from U.S. Reps. Sharice Davids and Emanuel Cleaver.

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Segment 1: Focus on government shutdown has drawn attention away from expanding national debt and deficit. 

The ongoing battle between political parties has highlighted the dysfunction in our goverment. Meanwhile the national debt continues to accumulate, and is burdening the future economy. We heard why one fiscal policy advocate believes the conflict will end "with both sides declaring victory," and no real winners.  

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Segment 1: What health care coverage is right for you, and what to do if you need help enrolling.

More coverage options have been added to the health insurance marketplace — some as part of the Affordable Care Act and some not — and premium costs this year are expected to remain the same, or even decline in some states. Today, we answered open enrollment and coverage questions to help listeners make the best choice for themselves and their families.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders in the White House briefing room with the American flag behind her and to the right.
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Segment 1: New Kansas City Public Schools sub-district map creates controversy. 

Claire Verbeck / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Why a consent decree between Kansas City and the EPA is impacting how much you pay for sewer services.

Sharma-Crawford Attorneys at Law

When it comes to immigration enforcement in this country, a person's fate can be a little "luck of the draw." Is it fair to send away some people who have been living here for years, while letting others stay? Today, Up To Date's Ethics Professors gives us their take on that and two other tough and timely questions. With an investigation swirling around Missouri's governor, how important is it to honor the anonymity request of an involved, but private, citizen?

David Shankbone / Ryan J. Reilly / Max Goldberg / Flickr - CC

Are threats of coal the best way to get children to behave? Today, the Ethics Professors take a look at what Santa's naughty-and-nice list may be teaching our kids. Then, a conversation about the ongoing surge of sexual misconduct allegations. Brenda Bethman, director of the UMKC Women's Center, joins the ethics team to take a deeper dive into how to handle the the assault and harassment revelations that continue to surface.

Missouri Sen. Maria Chappelle-Nadal and Rep. Warren Love made news last month doing something that seems antithetical to their positions in government; hoping in Facebook posts for political violence.

Charvex / Wikipedia Commons

The J.C. Nichols Memorial Fountain is named after a man who did great things for Kansas City. However, his achievements were accompanied by racist beliefs and policies that still divide us. Today, the Ethics Professors discuss whether we should rename monuments that honor historic figures whose standards don't pass contemporary moral muster. Then, we explore the gray area of political free speech for public educators.

Rene Ehrhardt / Flickr - CC

Should doctors and judges be able to decide on an infant's end-of-life care, even if it goes against the wishes of the child's parents? Does a presidential adviser owe his or her personal loyalty to their boss?

Will O'Neill / Flickr - CC

Today we ask the Ethics Professors which services the government is (and is not) morally obligated to provide its citizens. Health care? Education? A good-paying job? Then, KCUR's Sam Zeff fills us in on a Kansas Supreme Court ruling with major implications for education funding and equity.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

These days political news provides plenty of fodder for Up To Date's Ethics Professors. Today, we ask them if it's okay for protestors to break the law for a cause. They also discuss whether Senate Democrats would be justified in stonewalling President Trump's new Supreme Court nominee, the same way Republicans refused to recognize President Obama's.

Joseph Keppler / Puck / Public Domain

President-elect Trump's one-off deal making with the likes of Carrier, Ford, and SoftBank have raised concerns about crony capitalism. The Ethics Professors tackle that issue, and discuss whether U.S.

Dmitry Grigoriev / Flickr - CC

Today, the Ethics Professors take on what's been a prickly issue for Shawnee Mission schools. Should teachers be allowed to wear safety pins in classrooms?

First, the Ethics Professors decide whether complaining about politics without casting a vote is something to feel guilty about, and discuss the morals of disclosing Donald Trump's old tax returns without his permission. Finally, Brian McTavish gives us a rundown of the latest Weekend To-Do List.

On this edition of Up To Date, the Ethics Professors take on the recent outcry involving athletes Ryan Lochte and Colin Kaepernick, and look at the University of Chicago's refusal to create safe spaces on campus.

Guests:

  • Wayne Vaught is dean of the UMKC College of Arts and Sciences and a professor of philosophy, medicine and bioethics.
  • Clancy Martin is a professor of philosophy at UMKC and a professor of business ethics at the Bloch School of Management. 

  In this edition of Up To Date, the Ethics Professors, joined by Angie Blumel of the Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault, wade through the controversy surrounding an editorial in The Kansas City Star that encouraged rape victims to "accept [their] role in what happened." We also look at the impact violent images in the media have, and whether or not the political process is "rigged" to exclude the wishes of regular voters.

 Guests:

When it comes to taxes, are we morally obligated to pay them to help our society? As presidential nominating conventions come up, is it ethical for a party to change the rules to block a candidate, even if he or she has a large majority of the popular vote? Up To Date's Ethics professors tackle these issues and more.

Guests:

  • Clancy Martin is a professor of philosophy at UMKC.
  • Adrian Switzer is an assistant professor in the Department of Philosophy at the UMKC.

The L.A. Times recently ran a story on a counter-intuitive study that shows that children raised in non-religious homes “are more generous and altruistic than children from observant families.” The Ethics Professors discuss the role religion plays in instilling morals. 

Guests:

The U.S. is pledging to take in 85,000 refugees from around the world in 2016. The Ethics Professors discuss whether that's enough as the crisis in Syria continues. Also, is it ethical to let the free market decide prescription prices if that puts drugs outside the reach of many who need them, and should leaders remain in their positions if they, or their organization, are under investigation?

Guests:

In light of the recent hack of marital affairs website Ashley Madison, the ethics professors discuss whether it's right for hackers to appoint themselves judge and jury. Also, as laws regarding marijuana change, is it ethical to keep nonviolent drug offenders behind bars?

Guests:

With the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on same-sex marriage, some county clerks have refused to issue marriage licenses, citing religious beliefs. The Ethics Professors discuss performing government duties that conflict with one's faith. Plus, is it okay to break the law in the name of a just cause?

Guests: 

If you favor a hike in the minimum wage, are you obligated to boycott businesses that don't pay their employees enough? Also, should a distasteful comment on Twitter ruin your life? The Ethics Professors tackle these issues on this edition of Up To Date

Indiana and Arkansas are in the news for controversial legislature aimed at protecting religious freedom. On this edition of Up To Date, the Ethics professors discuss when religious freedom infringes on other freedoms. Plus, what  responsibilities do employers and employees have when it comes to illness, mental or otherwise, in the workplace?

Guests:

The recent suicide of State Auditor Tom Schweich brought new focus on the impact of political ads. In today's world, any detail of a political figure's life can be fodder for a brutal attack. On this edition of Up To Date, the Ethics Professors talk about when politics goes too far, and whether it's realistic to limit political tactics.

Guests:

  Vaccination is just one of many medical choices made for children. On this edition of Up To Date, Steve Kraske and guests talk about who gets to weigh in on those decisions: the parents, the doctors, the government?  And what input do children have regarding their own health care?

Guests:

Jamelle Bouie / Flickr Creative Commons

  In the wake of grand juries not indicting the police officers involved in the shooting death of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo. and the choking death of Eric Garner in New York City, the actions of police officers are receiving intense public scrutiny. 

On this edition of Up to Date, Steve Kraske and the Ethics Professors look at the question of whether police officers are too often given the benefit of the doubt. 

Guests:

Ethics Professors: Right To Die, Ebola Quarantines, And Same-Sex Marriage

Nov 13, 2014
The Maynard Family / abcnews.go.com

A terminally-ill woman in Oregon chose to end her life last week, should she be allowed to make this choice? A nurse in Maine aggressively fought that state's strict Ebola quarantine, does the greater good trump individual rights? Courts throughout the country are grappling with same-sex marriage bans, are people entitled to marry?

On this edition of Up to Date, guest-host Jeremy Bernfeld and the Ethics Professors sift through these moral dilemmas and the questions they raise. 

Guests:

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