fashion | KCUR

fashion

Lisa Choules

A dancer who hears "elevé" knows to push herself up onto her toes. In 2010, when retired ballerina Lisa Choules needed an apt name for her fledgling dancewear company, the term sounded just right.

Everyone needed a lift: She was a single mom scouting for a new career; ballerinas needed a better-fitting leotard.

Seg. 1: Immigrant Anxiety | Seg. 2: Volcano Gear

Jul 18, 2019

Segment 1: How Kansas City immigrants are dealing with threats of raids.

"Just in case" is the phrase Celia Calderon Ruiz uses to sum up how people in her community are dealing with the possibility of a raid in Kansas City. Our guests offer clarification on the constitutional rights of migrants, regardless of status.   

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Nina Littrell, a senior in the fiber department at the Kansas City Art Institute, says she wants to start a conversation about the fashion industry and its role in the growing environmental crisis.

In her work, Littrell combines traditional quilting and patchwork design to give discarded textiles a new life in the form of colorful jackets.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Some of the pieces in Clarissa Knighten's jewelry lines are over the top, and she knows it. But over-the-top is good for a couple of things: the runway, which she’ll hit during Kansas City Fashion Week, and temporarily taking on a new persona.

"Sometimes — I know from battling depression and bulimia — you have to step out of who you normally are, change things up," Knighten says.

Shy Boys

Segment 1: For All The World To See exhibit at the Black Archives of Mid-America.

A nationally touring exhibit from NEH on the Road has made its way to Kansas City. "For All The World To See" displays photographs and other visuals from the civil rights era. We talked about the ways art and culture influence each other.

Segment 1: New York fashion icon kept Kansas City roots.

The death of fashion designer Kate Spade touched a nerve here locally. We speak with a local reporter who met Spade and remembers her as being very much Kansas Citian.

Segment 2, beginning at 15:01: Research on suicide prevention is progressing.

Bloch News / UMKC

Fashion designer Kate Spade, 55, was found dead in her New York City apartment on Tuesday. The Associated Press reports that she died by suicide. 

She was born Katherine Noel Brosnahan in Kansas City, Missouri, and graduated from St. Teresa's Academy. She went on to attend the University of Kansas, and switched to Arizona State University. That's where she met her future husband, Andy Spade.

Segment 1: How a sea voyage inspired a fashion collection.

Her grandparents immigrated to America from England in the hull of a ship. Hear how that journey helped inspire a collection at this year's West 18th Street Fashion Show.

  • Amani Skalacki, jewelry designer/stylist

West 18th Street Fashion Show, 8 p.m. Saturday, June 9 on West 18th Street between Baltimore and Wyandotte Streets, Kansas City, Missouri 64108.

Segment 1: A new play about gun violence in Kansas.

Nathan Louis Jackson's new play, "Brother Toad," is set in Wyandotte County and Johnson County. It's about two men who are going down different paths when it comes to protecting their families. Hear more about the play and about Jackson's changing views on guns.

On our First Friday arts show: a local artist has been keeping a dream journal for over 40 years. In his new exhibit, he's brought recurring objects from his dreams to life through sculpture. Then, we talk to the star of a one-woman show about fashion icon Diana Vreeland, and a band conductor on how his group keeps the Kansas City sound alive ... and how they're taking a step to address the gender imbalance in jazz.

Guests:

Last month, at Milan Fashion Week, the models at the Missoni show walked the runway under a colorful fabric canopy that was created by a Blue Springs native. We chat with artist Rachel Hayes about her fabric sculptures.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

Nestled between Kansas City’s downtown business district and the River Market are a bunch of buildings that once literally hummed with the sound of fashion.

From the 1940s through the early 1980s, Kansas City had one of the largest garment industries in the nation. It spanned the area roughly from Wyandotte to Washington and Sixth to Ninth Streets. The local manufacturers there created some of the country’s best-known brands: The Donnelly Garment Company, commonly known as Nelly Don, and YouthCraft, maker of coats and dresses. At its peak the industry was estimated to support over 75 companies.

Christopher Bulle / Flickr -- CC

A local fashion designer put out a call to see if people would be interested in sewing lessons. The answer was a resounding yes. In a time when clothes are so cheap that they're practically disposable, we look into why there's a renewed interest in making and mending garments.

Plus, the National Storytelling Network's big annual conference kicks off in KC today. We hear from one of the participants.

Guests:

The story of how a KU lecturer learned how to speak Miskitu, an indigenous Central American language ... and how she became the host of a radio show and wrote an operetta, both in Miskitu. Then, a conversation with the owner of Asiatica, the longtime KC store where Japanese textiles are adapted and transformed into garments for Americans.

Plus, some clarification on the conceal carry laws on college campuses in Kansas.

Guests:

Kansas City Fashion Week

Kansas City takes the nickname 'Paris of the Plains' seriously, and not just because of our fountains. Today, we learn why Kansas City Fashion Week has designers, photographers, models, makeup artists, and stylists gathered in the Heartland. Then, the director of the Vatican Observatory looks at the intersection of religion and science. He'll also answer an "age-old" question for us: Should extraterrestrials be baptized?

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Despite her lifelong Muslim faith, Sofia Khan didn't always wear a head scarf. She was a spiritual person but considered herself a moderate practitioner of Islam, wearing a head scarf on certain occasions.

That changed after the 9/11 terror attacks.

"I realized a negative image was coming on my faith," Khan says. "I wanted to make a statement and show people this not what Islam is. There are so many Muslims living around you, you just don’t know who they are."

Courtesy Wuz Smith / Instagram

Wuz Smith isn’t quite sure what his next step is. He recently graduated from Frontier School of Excellence in Kansas City, Missouri, but right now, he’s weighing his options.

“I’m just kind of going with the flow right now,” he told host Gina Kaufmann on KCUR’s Central Standard. “Just experiencing new places and new things.”

As sous chef at Café Sebastienne, Janet Ross prepares ruby trout with a root vegetable hash. As a contestant on Cutthroat Kitchen: Tournament of Terror, she uses murder weapons to prepare Halloween-themed meals like liver and brains. How does she transition between the two? 

Kyle Smith / KCUR 89.3

A former contestant on Project Runway: Junior discusses how his upbringing in Minneapolis, Kansas influences his creations — and how his design aesthetic is geared towards "BA women who want to look glamorous."

In this encore presentation of Central Standard, we revisit our conversation with teenage fashion designer Jaxson Metzler.

Guest:

Courtesy of Amina Hood / Amina Marie Millinery

Hats may not seem like the cutting edge of fashion, but one Brookside milliner is drawing international attention nevertheless. We invite Kansas City's own Amina Hood to share the personal story of her craft.

Guest: 

From post-breakup T-shirts to a candle that evokes the smells of MLB's opening day, some local makers tell their stories.

Guests:

Kyle Smith / KCUR 89.3

When Jaxson Metzler described his fashion aesthetic to Project Runway: Junior host Tim Gunn, he said that he's inspired by “B.A. women who want to look glamorous.”

“For what women?” asked Gunn.

“Bad-ass women, that's what they are,” Metzler replied.

A young fashion designer on Project Runway: Junior discusses how his upbringing in Minneapolis, Kansas influences his creations — and how his design aesthetic is geared towards "BA women who want to look glamorous."

Guest:

Alyson Raletz / KCUR

Tom Paolini makes custom suits for a living, so it stands to reason that he goes out and about in Kansas City wearing spiffy, fashion-forward suits.

"I'm looking forward to the day where I'm wearing a suit and I don't get a compliment," Paolini said on Central Standard. "Right now, you're more the exception."

Alyson Raletz, KCUR

Kansas City is a dress-casual town, for the most part — it's not uncommon to see people (especially guys) wearing baseball caps or Big 12 gear while out and about. However, there are signs that the men's fashion scene is branching out. We invite two local suit connoisseurs and a bow-tie entrepreneur to talk about style and what fashion means to them.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR

One of the latest trends in fashion and technology is based on a very old technology.

Even as cellphone manufacturers and other tech companies are trying to pack every possible gadget into a "wearable" device, some people, young and old, are opting to wear old-fashioned wristwatches.

"Fashion's Enduring Marriage To Color"

Nov 19, 2014

Color has a wide-ranging impact on our day-to-day lives, but we don't always pay attention to it. It emotes memory and can determine an era-- just think of the 1960s.

On this edition of Up to Date Steve Kraske talks with Leatrice Eiseman about Pantone on Fashion: A Century of Color in Design. They discuss the psychological aspects of different hues, how the eye views color, and Pantone's Color of the Year. 

Guest:

Kansas City Museum

The Kansas City Art Institute doesn’t offer degrees in fashion design, but students in the fiber department spend plenty of time thinking about clothing, costumes, performance and the human body as a means of expression, says Pauline Verbeek-Cowart, the chair of the department.

So when she got a call from Kansas City Museum Executive Director Anna Marie Tutera about co-curating a show called Rituals and Celebrations: Exploring Meaning Through Dress, she was up for it.

KCBMC

The first disposable safety razor was invented in Boston in 1901, and with it came over a century of clean-shaven American men. But recent years have witnessed a revival of stubbled jaws, mustachioed lips, and bearded cheeks - from Ben Affleck and George Clooney to the 2007 writers' strike and the World Series Red Sox. On today's Up To Date, Steve Kraske looks at the newfound respectability of the beard, how it's become a style icon in its own right, and how facial hair stereotypes are being shorn away.

J. Crew

The unwritten rules of how to dress for different occasions can create ambiguous boundaries that are often difficult to navigate.

What does "business casual" actually mean? Would flip-flops ever be fashionable at a wedding?

On Tuesday's Central Standard, we investigate how to decipher different dress codes, and discuss how we communicate with our clothing. 

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