Garment District | KCUR

Garment District

Segment 1: 100 Years Of Swimwear

A new clothing exhibition at the Kansas City Museum at the Historic Garment District focuses on the history of swim fashion. Looking back on the past 100 years, the exhibit examines the changes in swimwear fashion until the modern age. We talk to the collections specialist from the museum about the exhibit and how changes in swimwear reflect changes in our society and culture. 

Segment 1: The cultural and personal history of T-shirts.

T-shirts are our personal billboards; they can make a statement about what we care about or where we've been. Inspired by "My Tee & Me," a new exhibit at the Kansas City Museum, we take a look at why T-shirts are so interwoven with our cultural history as a country ... and our own personal histories as well.

Courtesy photo / facebook

Steve Glorioso, a political operative known and respected by officials and movers and shakers of every political stripe, died Thursday night, according to The Kansas City Star.  He was 70 years old.

Mayor Sly James said Glorioso was dedicated to improving Kansas City throughout his long career.

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

Nestled between Kansas City’s downtown business district and the River Market are a bunch of buildings that once literally hummed with the sound of fashion.

From the 1940s through the early 1980s, Kansas City had one of the largest garment industries in the nation. It spanned the area roughly from Wyandotte to Washington and Sixth to Ninth Streets. The local manufacturers there created some of the country’s best-known brands: The Donnelly Garment Company, commonly known as Nelly Don, and YouthCraft, maker of coats and dresses. At its peak the industry was estimated to support over 75 companies.

In the 1930s, the garment industry was huge in Kansas City, in both manufacturing and retail. It employed a lot of local women — particularly immigrant women. What was the KC garment industry like in its heyday, and what happened to it?

Guests: