government shutdown | KCUR

government shutdown

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Kansas City photographers William Fambrough and Matthew Washington captured the African-American experience in Kansas City. 

For a long time African Americans did not have the same documented written sources as others in this country. Historian Delia Cook Gillis says this is one reason why visual images are important. They document lost narratives with an artistic story. Gillis talked about the importance of remembering African American history, and about two photographers who helped to do just that in Kansas City.  

Burns & McDonnell / Copaken Brooks

Segment 1: Commercial real estate projects are surging throughout the metro.

Major developments popping up in the Plaza, Crossroads, and downtown may not be changing the skyline (yet), but they are making Kansas City "taller." Today, the city's foremost reporter on downtown development shared details on new and in-the-works office buildings, apartments, and hotels, and discussed how "downtown is becoming a more dense and vibrant place."

Hundreds of thousands of federal employees around the country are returning to work after being furloughed for more than a month. Thousands of others in the federal workforce did work during the 35-day shutdown but didn't get paid.

The Trump administration promises that by Friday federal workers will be paid the two consecutive paychecks that were missed as a result of the government being shuttered.

Updated at 9:45 p.m. ET

The longest government shutdown in history ended after President Trump signed a bipartisan three-week stopgap funding measure late Friday. Several agencies had been partially shuttered for 35 days.

"I am very proud to announce today that we have reached a deal to end the shutdown and reopen the federal government," Trump said earlier Friday in the White House Rose Garden, announcing the long-awaited bipartisan breakthrough.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

New data from the Washington Post suggests the Kansas City area is missing out on $10 million a week from government contracts as the shutdown stretches on. That’s in addition to the thousands of federal workers not getting paid. Those missed paychecks for contractors and employees alike have placed a heavy burden on both budgets and families.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3FM

The Topeka Symphony Orchestra has offered furloughed federal government employees two free tickets to a concert. Regardless of whether the partial government shutdown ends any time soon, the offer's good for any of the orchestra's three performances between now and May.

Missourians who are eligible for Food Stamp benefits will receive their February Food Stamp benefit early.  The United States Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service (FNS), which administers the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) or Food Stamp program, informed states that payments for the February Food Stamp or SNAP benefit must be issued on January 20 due to the partial federal government shutdown.

Sharice Davids

U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids, the new congresswoman from Kansas' 3rd District, will meet with Republican Sen. Jerry Moran this week and lobby him to vote for a House bill that would reopen the government, Davids said on Sunday.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3 file photo

As she bids farewell to her seat in Congress, tension has followed Missouri's former senior senator. Since her defeat in the midterms, Claire McCaskill has been criticized for her comments about abortion rights advocates, a certain new member of the House of Representatives, and those she wished were more critical of the president. Today, she addressed those topics, and spoke about her time in office, the current partial government shutdown, and her expectations for Democrats going forward.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

"Hey-hey, ho-ho — this government shutdown's got to go."

Around 150 federal employees gathered to protest the government shutdown Thursday outside of the IRS building near downtown Kansas City, Missouri. The shutdown began December 21 and continues over President Trump's demand that Congress fund a border wall.

Sam Zeff / KCUR 89.3

Even breweries are feeling the pinch of the partial federal government shutdown.  

“The regulating body that we have to submit all of our labels to, to get approved by is shut down,” says James Stutsman, founder of City Barrel Brewing.

Stutsman shared his story on KCUR's Central Standard Wednesday.

SpaceX

As President Donald Trump prepared to address the nation about the partial shutdown of the federal government, U.S. Sen. Jerry Moran huddled with staffers this week talking about rocket launches.

They fretted over whether the furlough of workers at NASA and the Federal Aviation Administration could force the delay of satellite and experimental rocket launches.

Seg. 1: The Shutdown Show. Seg 2: General Hospital #2.

Jan 9, 2019

Segment 1: Kansas City stories about the federal government shutdown.

From an entrepreneur whose plans to open his own business have been thwarted, to the federal employee who made the daunting decision to borrow against her pension. Hear stories from Kansas Citians whose lives are in limbo on day 18 of a federal government shutdown. 

Nic McPhee / Flickr - CC

Segment 1: Focus on government shutdown has drawn attention away from expanding national debt and deficit. 

The ongoing battle between political parties has highlighted the dysfunction in our goverment. Meanwhile the national debt continues to accumulate, and is burdening the future economy. We heard why one fiscal policy advocate believes the conflict will end "with both sides declaring victory," and no real winners.  

Chris Murphy / Flickr-CC

On what threatens to become the longest government shutdown in history, Kansas Republican representatives tend to agree — Democrats are to blame. 

It's the third week of the shutdown, which came after Democrats and Republicans in the Senate failed to reach an agreement on a spending bill that would allocate $5 billion for a border wall. That means it's the third consecutive week thousands of federal workers across the country have gone without pay.

Kevin Collison

The Kansas City streetcar rolled out of 2018 with ridership up 2.6 percent over the previous year and looking for signals early in the new year about its planned expansions to the riverfront and UMKC.

The downtown streetcar attracted 2,114,886 rides last year compared to 2,060,327 in 2017. Overall, more than 5.5 million people have ridden the line since it opened in May 2016.

“The continued growth in ridership is what we hoped,” said Executive Director Tom Gerend. “It’s a reflection of all the activity downtown with new commercial and residential development.”

Infinite Energy Construction

Some 19,000 federal government workers are scattered across the Kansas City area. As the federal government shutdown continues, most of them are looking at a second missed paycheck.

Many small businesses with government contracts are also dealing with uncertainty, although there is one certainty: Things can change quickly.

Party Lines Mean Little In KC Area Debt Crisis Vote

Oct 17, 2013

Kansas Republican Sen. Pat Roberts was the lone “no” vote among U.S. Senators from Missouri and Kansas as the debt ceiling crisis was averted and the federal government reopened.

Most House Members from the region voted with Roberts and on the losing side of a measure that is now law.

No votes came from Republicans Kevin Yoder, Sam Graves and Vicky Hartzler.  

The  Ayes were counted among Jerry Moran, Lynn Jenkins and Democrat Emanuel Cleaver who later talked with Steve Kraske on KCUR program Up To Date, unhappy with the temporary budgetary solution.

Visitors to Missouri can once again go up in the Gateway Arch in St. Louis and pitch tents at federally-run campsites, now that the government shutdown has ended. 

The Arch in downtown St. Louis opened Thursday without any problems and with the average number of visitors wanting to go inside, according to representatives with the Jefferson National Expansion Memorial.  There were also no issues with the reopening of the Ozark National Scenic Riverways in southern Missouri. 

Both of Missouri’s U.S. Senators voted in favor of the bill Wednesday night that reopened the federal government and raised the country’s debt ceiling.

The measure, approved by the House and Senate and signed by the President early Thursday, restores funding for the government through January 15 and extends the nation's borrowing authority through February 7.

Republican Senator Roy Blunt of Missouri says he hopes the government learned some lessons during the 16-day shutdown.

Relief. At the eleventh hour, Congress agreed on a bill to end the government shutdown and avert a default on U.S. debt. It was signed early Thursday morning by President Barack Obama.

Here is how our regional delegation voted on the bill:

Kansas Senate

Pat Roberts (R) - No
Jerry Moran (R) - Yes

Kansas House

Tim Huelskamp (R) - No
Lynn Jenkins (R) - Yes
Kevin Yoder (R) - No
Mike Pompeo (R) – No

Missouri Senate

Roy Blunt (R) - Yes
Claire McCaskill (D) - Yes

Govt. Shutdown Halts Farm Chemical Inspections

Oct 16, 2013
Rennett Stowe / Flickr--CC

American farmers count on a steady supply of herbicides, fungicides and insecticides to keep pests from destroying their crops,  but the government shutdown is creating a backlog of chemicals needed to produce the vital tools.

Frank Morris / KCUR-FM

Normally, Friday would be a big day for the commodity markets. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s World Agricultural Supply and Demand Report is due, providing what is widely excepted to be the most trusted and complete snapshot of farm markets in the middle of harvest season. But, with the government shutdown the report is not coming out. In fact, farmers and ranchers aren’t getting any of the USDA information they rely on, and in this case, ignorance is not bliss.

Kansas WIC Checks In Jeopardy Due To Federal Shutdown

Oct 10, 2013

If the federal government shutdown continues longer than two more weeks, 70,000 young mothers, babies and preschoolers in Kansas stand to lose access to some of the food they rely on.

The Kansas Department of Health and Environment has ordered local WIC offices to withhold checks for November and December until federal funding is assured. WIC checks are normally issued for three months at a time. 

U.S. Rep. Emanuel Cleaver (D, MO-5) joins Steve Kraske to give an update on what happening with the federal government shutdown and the impending debt ceiling issue.

accesskansas.org

Another 263  people who work for national guard units in Kansas but are paid by federal programs, got  confirmation as late as October 4 that their paychecks have been stopped.

They join 772 others notified earlier to stay home without pay.

First it was soldiers and airmen of Kansas National Guard. 

Sharon Watson of the Adjutant General’s Office  says the latest are federally-funded state employees, sometimes more than one in a household.

The federal government shutdown has now hit the Missouri National Guard.

Late Wednesday, the Guard furloughed nearly a thousand of their 1,400 federal technicians considered to be non-essential. Spokeswoman, Major Tammy Spicer, says the technicians include both civilian and uniformed staff.

"Full-time federal technicians do a variety of jobs across the state, anything from clerical, to mechanical, to aviation related," Spicer said.

Just over 400 federal technicians considered essential remain on duty. Meanwhile, weekend drills have also been called off.

Flickr

When thousands of federal employees are being forced to go without a paycheck indefinitely because of inaction in Congress, is it really ethical for members of Congress to keep accepting their own paychecks?

On Thursday's Up to Date, the Ethics Professors join us to discuss that and other issues of murky morals. Should we consider signing up for healthcare part of a civic duty to lower medical costs for everyone? And how should we set a limit when it comes to the cost and scope of treatment?

Guests:

Government Shutdown Crimps Some Food Inspections

Oct 2, 2013
rick / Flickr--CC

Consumers can rest assured that even with the government shutdown that went into effect on Tuesday, all of the meat, poultry and eggs bought from the grocery store will be inspected as usual by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

But that’s not necessarily the case for other foods -- like cheese, produce and boxes of cereal. Inspections for these products fall under the purview of the Food and Drug Administration, which had to furlough 45 percent of its staff on Tuesday.

Head Start, a federally funded pre-K program for low-income children, had already been hit by a 5.3 percent sequestration budget cut. In the Kansas City metropolitan area, 200 Head Start slots were eliminated in Missouri and 50 more in Kansas.

On Tuesday, due to the government shutdown, 23 Head Start programs in 11 states, with fiscal years beginning October 1, were told to close.

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