hunting | KCUR

hunting

Segment 1: Thanksgiving's got us thinking about turkey (and duck and quail and pheasant).

Hunters and chefs are making plans for fall birds. From the key to a good brine to the effect of flooding on duck season, we get the inside story. Plus, the food critics help us find the best places to go in Kansas City for the fowl-less-eaten.

A flight of doves breaks above the tree line. Fourteen-year-old Robert Goodall fires his shotgun. The birds continue on their path unharmed.

“Never shoot at the bird,” Robert's grandfather, Richard Funk, said. “Always in front of it.”

Robert enjoys going hunting when his grandfather asks him to go along. But the morning’s been slow. He’d prefer something a little more exciting, like football.

Feral hogs are causing major damage to the Mark Twain National Forest.

The animals dig up grasslands and crops, they eat eggs and baby wildlife, and scratching an itch on their backs can literally strip the bark off a tree.

Hunters want a chance to help out with this menace that can weigh over 200 pounds and produce 40 to 50 offspring a year. But the National Forest Service is considering outlawing feral hog hunts on public land in the Mark Twain.

Jonathan Levinson / OPB

Tyler Tiller and his 10-year-old daughter, Taylor, sit perched on a log overlooking a fog-encased forest below. They're just off a mountainous dirt road in western Oregon. The sun is setting and with it, their last chance to shoot a doe this season.

Neither seems to care much. Their excursions aren’t really about hunting.

Far more important Tyler says is “just spending that time with each other in the outdoors and just really being able to have an opportunity away from everything to bond on a different level."

Deer hunters are helping out Missouri families again this year.

Since 1992, the Share the Harvest Program has collected more than 3.5 million pounds of venison from deer hunters across the state.

The program aims to lessen the burden of food insecurity for people by distributing deer meat to hundreds of food banks throughout the St. Louis region and statewide. It’s a collaborative effort between the Missouri Department of Conservation, the Conservation Federation of Missouri, meat processors, hunters and local organizations.

Segment 1: Recent study by KU finds gun owners are more politically active.

In the past few decades, American gun owners have become increasingly more involved in politics than non-gun owners. On this episode, we discuss the cultural shift in gun ownership and how that change influences the political climate.

Steve Bozak / Flickr -- CC

It's finally feeling like fall. To celebrate the start of crisp-weather season: a cocktail blogger shares her seasonal drink, The Early Fall Lowball, and we also talk to the 2017 winner of the World Champion Squirrel Cook Off. Then, a visit to a Bavarian-style biergarten, and the Food Critics search out the best outdoor dining spots in and around KC.

Guests:

www.imdb.com

Caught in between Republican and Democratic national conventions during this presidential election cycle, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics have a few picks this weekend to help you unplug from the political skirmishes across the nation. 

Robert Butler

Wiener-Dog, R

Kyle Palmer / KCUR

With several weeks remaining in the archery season, Missouri hunters this year have already killed more deer than either of the past two seasons. According to the state Department of Conservation's website, hunters have so far bagged more than 267,000 deer. 

What is the environmental impact of hunting? Two hunters share their views on hunting and conservation — and encourage people to interact with nature, even if it's just with a camera.

Guests:

David Chancellor - kiosk

Cecil the Lion’s death at the hands of a trophy hunter made headlines around the world a few months ago but that type of hunting is common in Africa. Photographer David Chancellor documented the people who participate in the sport, along with the big game targets they kill in his documentary series, Hunters.

Sylvia Maria Gross / KCUR

In recent years, taxidermy has bust out of hunter's dens and natural history museums to become a new trend in home decor, as well as a way to remember pets.

Guests:

  • Anthony Eddy, owner, Eddy's Wildlife Studio
  • Maxwell Ryan, founder and CEO, Apartment Therapy
  • Cindy Cunningham, taxidermist, Second Creation Taxidermy
  • Jane Almirall, artist and shop owner, Oracle

Sylvia Maria Gross / KCUR

A new shop in the Crossroads District in downtown Kansas City, Mo., looks like a naturalist’s cabinet filled with bones, feathers, insects and skins.

“We had a guy come in and said it looked like if a witch doctor and an interior designer kind of got together and started a shop,” says Jane Almirall, co-owner of Oracle, which opened about a year ago.

Among the animals on display are a white stag, a tiny black-and-white piglet, and above the doorway, a 100-year-old Canadian lynx, originally stuffed with newspaper and sawdust. 

Missouri Department of Conservation

April 1st marks the start of spring turkey season in Kansas for archers, youth and disabled hunters.

In the early 1960s, wild turkeys were reintroduced to the state, and almost every county now has a huntable population.

Mike Miller with the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks, and Tourism, says turkeys are anything but easy prey.

“When everything works out right it can be a really easy exciting hunt, for any hunter, especially a young hunter, just because of what you see and what you hear, and the whole build up as you get into shotgun range,” says Miller.

The Otter, Squirrel And Deer Hunter

Dec 3, 2012

If you've ever hunted for your food in the Oregon Trail video game, you know it's no easy task. Now, imagine stepping into the game yourself.