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inauguration

File photo by Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

A new era of Kansas City, Missouri, government has officially begun.

Mayor Quinton Lucas and new city council members were sworn in on the 26th floor of City Hall on a gray, rainy Thursday morning. 

"For some people, clear blue skies are this beacon of good fortune, but for me rain is the thing I look for all the time," Lucas said, citing the downpour on the night he was elected in June.

NOMIN UJIYEDIIN / KANSAS NEWS SERVICE

Kansas swore a new governor into office on Monday and saw the end of eight years of Republicans in the office.

New Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly told supporters, and the Republican lawmakers she’s sure to clash with, that the state had lost its sense of community. That seemingly was a dig at predecessors Sam Brownback and Jeff Colyer.

Courtesy Women's March on Washington in Kansas City

Angeliina Lawson lost her bid for a post in the Kansas legislature from western Shawnee, Kansas, earlier this year. In spite of, even because of that, she’s encouraging other women to step up and run for office – for school board, city council, mayor or state representative.

As vice president for the Greater Kansas City Women’s Political Caucus, Lawson says a lot of women are intimidated by the idea of a campaign. The only way to counter that fear, she says, is to be around other women candidates, officials and advocates.

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

Just one day before Donald Trump’s inauguration into office as President of the United States, KCUR’s Up To Date hosted a conversation asking the Kansas City region a question: “What do you want the new president to know about you, or your community, as he takes office?”

NPR

In conjunction with NPR's A Nation Engaged, we're asking people from across the region what they want the new president to know about themselves and their communities. Then, we preview an upcoming Conversation at the Square about the relationship between education and neighborhoods.

When the St. Louis Art Museum announced that George Caleb Bingham’s “Verdict of the People” would be sent to Washington, D.C. for the inauguration of President-Elect Donald Trump, local artist Ilene Berman took to Facebook to express her displeasure. She had plenty of company.

Before the Jan. 20 presidential inauguration puts the election to rest, we ask, does Midwestern representation in national politics depend on the Electoral College?

Plus, Kansas City recently lost a long-time member of its culinary community: Jennifer Maloney. With her passing, we take a moment to consider the character of the chef.

Guests:

Capitol
Marshall Griffin / St. Louis Public Radio file photo

The head of Eric Greitens’ transition team outlined the Missouri governor-elect’s legislative priorities for 2017 and new details on inaugural and transition activities during a conference call on Thursday.

Greitens will be sworn in at noon on Monday, January 9.

Austin Chambers, who will be a senior adviser in the new administration, says Greitens will focus his legislative efforts on laws related to jobs, ethics reform, public safety and education reform.

Reverend Adam Hamilton, the Senior Pastor at United Methodist Church of the Resurrection in Leawood, did not believe his assistant when she told him the White House called and asked for his presence at this year's inauguration ceremony. Hamilton gave the sermon at the National Prayer Service, held at the National Cathedral the day after the inauguration ceremonies, which has been a tradition for every inauguration ceremony starting with George Washington.