Kansas City Chiefs | KCUR

Kansas City Chiefs

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City had much to celebrate on Wednesday — not only the Chiefs' Super Bowl victory, but the fact that no one was seriously injured at its parade and rally.

“When you have hundreds of thousands of people gathered and you have two people charged with something and a minimal number of people detained for any type of investigation, that’s a good thing on the surface," said Kansas City Police Department Sgt. Jake Becchina.

Watch this video of Kansas City's daylong celebration:

Segment 1: MU and other universities are tracking attendance through a cellphone app.

Developed by a former Mizzou basketball coach, SpotterEDU has been used by MU to track attendance for student athletes for years and now they're expanding its use. MU says students can opt out if they're uncomfortable, but people across the country are concerned by the trend.

Segment 1: "When the Chiefs needed to pick up the yards, Damien Williams was there," said sports reporter Kennetra Pulliams.

In the wake of an historic Chiefs Super Bowl win, we discussed what went right on Sunday, which players could have also been in the running for MVP, and what the future could hold for the team. Plus, what Kansas City learned from the 2015 World Series parade when it comes to port-a-potties and keeping track of children.

Noah Taborda / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City threw a party 50 years in the making on Wednesday with a parade to celebrate the Kansas City Chiefs' victory in Super Bowl LIV.

Sam Zeff / KCUR 89.3

Kansas City will be a sea of red as Chiefs fans get a chance to celebrate the team’s victory with a parade and rally on Wednesday. 

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3FM

Car horns blared throughout downtown Sunday night as fans celebrated the Kansas City Chiefs' stunning comeback over the San Francisco 49ers to win Super Bowl LIV.

“We’re so happy and so grateful," said Logan Lund, a student at The University of Saint Mary in Leavenworth, Kan.

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

No more waiting, Kansas City: The Chiefs are Super Bowl champions again, and it’s time to party.

Screenshot from Snickers commercial

Kansas City companies have poked fun at Willie Nelson’s trouble with the IRS and shown someone faking their own death to switch cellphone plans during Super Bowl commercials in previous years. 

Super Bowl viewership regularly tops 100 million. For prominent Kansas City companies like H&R Block and Sprint, it has proven to be a prime chance to advertise. Here’s a look back at the ads run in past Super Bowls that have Kansas City connections. 

H&R Block’s Willie Nelson commercial (2003)

Jackson County (Missouri) Historical Society Archives

Back in 1970, Ilus Davis was the mayor of Kansas City, Missouri. The mob was a force to be reckoned with. The suburbs were booming. Paul Rudd was still in diapers. And the Chiefs won a Super Bowl.

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Kansas City Chiefs fans are among the tens of thousands of people pouring into South Florida this week, joining Midwest expats already here for a celebration of the team’s first Super Bowl appearance in half a century.

Jason Wickersheim / Two West Advertising, TwoWest.com

Kansas City may be keeping plans for a potential Super Bowl victory parade tightly under wraps, but that's not stopping downtown businesses from preparing for a historically large gathering downtown next week. 

Multiple businesses and organizations with offices downtown told KCUR they have been given word to prepare for a parade Wednesday, February 5, if the Chiefs win Super Bowl LIV on Sunday.

Christy Radecic for HOK

Kansas City is known for its style of barbecue and its jazz icons, but it's also a hub for sports architecture.

Populous, HOK and HNTB have played an outsized role in the design of ballparks and stadiums around the country, including the Hard Rock Stadium in Miami Gardens, Florida, just north of Miami, where the Kansas City Chiefs and the San Francisco 49ers play Sunday in Super Bowl LIV.

Charlie Riedel
AP Photo

The Kansas City Chiefs will face the San Francisco 49ers in the Super Bowl in Miami, giving Kansas City a moment of relative unity in a divisive time for the country. But the good feelings are tempered for Native Americans, some of whom find the imagery surrounding the team racist and demeaning.

Union Station is festooned with banners and signs honoring the Chiefs. Cheery fans filled the historic train station over the weekend, trading phones to take pictures of each other’s families.

Segment 1: The Media Critics discuss Pompeo, the Washington Post, impeachment and more.

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo's behavior towards NPR's Mary Louise Kelly was a hot topic in this discussion with the Media Critics. Plus, a journalist's suspension from the Washington Post raised a deeper question from one of our guests: Are journalists allowed to exist in spaces outside of the newsroom, including social media?

Segment 1: The link between sports and social justice is stronger than some people think.

The fight to end discrimination against black folks is ongoing, and Harry Edwards, who has spent the majority of his life as an activist and leader in the world of sports, says there are no final victories in such a dynamic struggle. From Muhammad Ali to Colin Kaepernick, he has played a role in some of the greatest stories in athletics and activism. 

Jose Lepe / AP Photo

Katie Sowers’ childhood passion for football has carried her from Hesston, Kansas, to Miami — and the Super Bowl, where she’ll be the first woman to ever coach in the title game.

Sowers is an assistant coach on offense for the rival San Francisco 49ers, and will be in the skybox with the other coaches strategizing against the Kansas City Chiefs, and the city she loves so much the skyline is tattooed on her left forearm. She’s also the first openly LGBTQ coach in the NFL and, thus, Super Bowl LIV.

Associated Press

In their last Super Bowl appearance half a century ago, the Kansas City Chiefs achieved an upset in more ways than one.

Not only did they defeat the favored Minnesota Vikings 23-7, the game marked the first big break in law enforcement’s longstanding efforts to bring down the Kansas City mob.

Peggy Lowe / KCUR 89.3

Not that he has a thing about his hometown football team and its quarterback, but don’t even think about asking Josh Weinstock to open his box of Mahomes Magic Crunch.

“I intend to keep that sealed ‘til the day I die,” Weinstock said. “If my grandchildren wanna open it one day, may they be cursed.”

A third shipment of the cereal was sent to Kansas City-area stores this week ahead of Super Bowl LIV. The new boxes were scheduled to be placed in stores Tuesday, said Tina Potthoff, Hy-Vee’s senior vice-president of communications.

Segment 1: A winning NFL franchise puts money in the pockets of its host economy.

Kansas Citians have more to celebrate than just an exciting season for the Chiefs. One study shows when an NFL team is successful, fans in the home city are happier and more productive. That increased productivity creates an economic impact of up to $100 per capita but don't be calling the Chiefs to collect! 

Segment 1: If you haven't been paying attention to football lately, here's what you need to know.

This is why Kansas City is SO excited for Super Bowl LIV.

Segment 2, beginning at 21:34: What does this year's Super Bowl mean to generations of Chiefs fans?

Courtesy / Stram family

The Kansas City Chiefs are preparing to play in the franchise's first Super Bowl since Pro Football Hall of Fame head coach Hank Stram led the team to a title in Super Bowl IV 50 years ago.

Stram's sons — Dale, now 64; Stu, 62; and Gary, 58 — were three of the six children raised by Phyllis and Hank Stram in Prairie Village in the 1960s and 1970s.

Texas Tech Athletics

It turns out, Patrick Mahomes isn’t the first Chiefs player from Texas Tech University to star in a Super Bowl.

That honor goes to E.J. Holub, who is the only player in NFL history to start a Super Bowl on offense and defense. In Super Bowl IV, he snapped the football to the game’s Most Valuable Player, Len Dawson, as the Chiefs’ starting center.

Four years earlier, he started at linebacker in the very first Super Bowl against the Green Bay Packers.

AP Photo/CHarlie Riedel

Your soundtrack for getting ready for Super Bowl LIV could start with tight end Travis Kelce's pick, "(You Gotta) Fight For Your Right (To Party!)" by the Beastie Boys, which he sang (or, rather, screamed) at fans after Kansas City's win in the AFC Championship game.

Or the stadium rock anthem and Queen classic, "We Are The Champions."

But it might be a little early for that...

Brynn Anderson / AP

The Kansas City Chiefs are headed to the Super Bowl for the first time in fifty years. That’s prompting many fans to consider a once-in-a-lifetime trip to Miami to see their team play in person at Hard Rock Stadium on Feb. 2.

Thinking of going to Miami for the big game? Here are some numbers you may want to consider.

Well — yes! — the Chiefs are going to the Super Bowl for the first time in half a century. But why does that matter? Commentator Victor Wishna offers just one reason, in this long-in-coming edition of 'A Fan’s Notes.'

I want to tell you a story. There are thousands like it. On Sunday, inside Arrowhead Stadium, there were about 74,000 stories. But this is mine.

Segment 1: Kansas City's journey toward greater inclusivity takes one step forward, two steps back.

The state of diversity and inclusion in Kansas City is shaping up to be one of this year's most tenuous storylines. We previewed both positive and negative issues facing marginalized communities in the metro, including diversity training for law enforcement and seemingly discriminatory legislative efforts.

Associated Press

Not since Len Dawson guided the Kansas City Chiefs to the Super Bowl IV title has the team had such an elite quarterback at the centerpiece of the offense and the team. 

But even Patrick Mahomes, who’s been the starting QB since 2018, knows he’s not the sum of all the parts on offense and defense. Here are five guys not named Mahomes who also bring something special to the Chiefs:

Segment 1: The Chiefs are the 2020 AFC Champions.

The "loudest stadium in the world" went wild last night after their team defeated the Tennesse Titans and earned a spot in the Feb. 2 Super Bowl game against the San Fransisco 49ers. Our sportscaster guests both picked the Chiefs to win that matchup, but there's still a great deal to consider before the red and gold confetti flies.

Eric Stonestreet / Twitter

Kansas City Chiefs fans weren't the only ones showering their team with love on Sunday after the team beat the Tennessee Titans 35-24 to win the AFC Championship game. 

Turns out, making your first Super Bowl in a half-century makes you pretty popular. 

Former U.S. Sen. Bob Dole and rocker Melissa Etheridge chimed in with congratulatory takes on Sunday. Even Missouri-native Brad Pitt got in on the action. 

Ed Zurga / AP

For the first time in half a century, the Kansas City Chiefs are going to the Super Bowl. 

The Chiefs beat the Tennessee Titans 35-24 at Arrowhead Stadium Sunday to win the AFC Championship, a year after falling just short in a heartbreaking overtime loss to the New England Patriots.

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