Kansas City Missouri | KCUR

Kansas City Missouri

Anne Kniggendorf

Over the last few weeks, as Kansas City artist Israel Garcia made his way through Texans' backyards to the barrier that divides the United States from Mexico, he imagined everyone in the neighborhood would be well-versed on immigration policy.

"My assumption was if this border fence is your backyard fence that you’d be completely informed. Like you knew the ins and outs, you knew the politics, you knew how it all works," the Mexico native says.

REBECCA HANGE / KCUR 89.3

People are less likely to commit crimes when they think they’ll get caught.

That seeming truism, which is supported by research and the Department of Justice, led the Kansas City Police Department to make some changes this year after a wave of violence in 2017 sent the homicide rate to levels not seen in more than two decades.

Segment 1: What would we be doing if we weren't on Facebook?

Eric Winkler

 

Segment 1: A new report shows mid-sized cities are better positioned to see faster growth.

Bill Pryor

Turns out Truman Capote didn’t like Christmas much. The "In Cold Blood" and "Breakfast at Tiffany's" author wasn’t alone.

"We have these lives we want to have," said Prospero's bookstore owner Will Leathem, "and quite often Christmas puts an exclamation point on the reminder that maybe there's a little disjunct between what we want ourselves to be and where we are."

Segment 1: A bookstore stage for a literary legend.

Tru is a one-man production about writer Truman Capote's lonely Christmas in 1975.  We speak with the actor about preparing for the role and what he has learned about Capote's character. The play is on at Prospero's Books until December 30th.

Elizabeth Stehling

For years, ballet dancer Whitney Huell had an ornament of the Sugar Plum Fairy from "The Nutcracker" hanging on her Christmas tree. The miniature ballerina was African-American like Huell.

"This is a very iconic role and a role that many dancers dream of doing, myself included," Huell told Central Standard host Gina Kaufmann. The role of Sugar Plum Fairy is so big, in fact, that Huell barely allowed herself to think snagging it was possible, though she’s been a professional dancer for a decade.

KC Streetcar Authority

A multimodal plan to extend the streetcar line to the riverfront, including a new concept to build a separate bicycle and pedestrian bridge next to the Grand Boulevard viaduct, continues to roll, but without help from Washington.

Segment 1: Kansas City Ballet's first black Sugar Plum Fairy.

Ballerina Whitney Huell is making history as the first African-American woman to play the Sugar Plum Fairy in the Kansas City Ballet's version of The Nutcracker. We talk with her about her career and what it means to have dancers of color on the stage in lead roles.

  • Whitney Huell, ballerina, Kansas City Ballet

Segment 2, beginning at 17:50: Checking in with a new app to connect people with black-owned businesses.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Iqra Aden was one of hundreds of students across the Kansas City area who a scholarship of $10,000 a year for up to five years to attend the University of Missouri. 

"I'm feeling ecstatic, and shocked," the Lincoln College Preparatory Academy senior said after getting the news Monday.

Food Critics: Steak

Dec 17, 2018

Segment 1: Deciphering different cuts of steak.

What's a ribeye? A filet mignon? A tenderloin? We talk with a local butcher about the differences in cuts of meat. 

Segment 2, beginning at 14:23: Where to get the best steak.

NASA

Fifty years ago on Christmas Eve, the astronauts of Apollo 8 — the first humans to leave Earth’s gravity — orbited the moon, photographing its dark side and witnessed the first view of an earthrise.

Broadcasting back to Houston, they offered a Christmas greeting to those on Earth, where one in four people were watching the televised event.

Public domain

Everything about Walt Disney is legendary, especially in his hometown of Kansas City where a mythology has grown up around the young ad man who created the world’s most-beloved character.

But, what does anyone really know about that mouse?

"How can the most popular fictional character in the world be someone that no one knows anything about?" author Jeff Ryan asked Central Standard host Gina Kaufmann.