Kansas City Public Library | KCUR

Kansas City Public Library

Peggy Lowe / KCUR 89.3

Church services were live-streamed, libraries and other gathering places emptied out and people huddled at home on Sunday, as fears of the coronavirus pandemic placed further limits on public life in Kansas City.

Segment 1: How local churches are finding their way in the midst of coronavirus

Houses of worship have long served as a safe place for some people to gather in times of fear and uncertainty. But when large gatherings pose a threat to health, where do people turn? Today, we learn what three local churches are doing to serve their congregants while ensuring their health and safety are protected.

Segment 1: In 1990, Deanna Dikeman took a photo of her parents waving goodbye to her as she drove away.

She continued to take these pictures for decades and today, what started as random keepsakes is now a series of photos spanning through her father’s death until her mother passed away. Since releasing “Leaving and Waving,” she has also received comments from people who can see moments from their own lives, reflected in hers.

Segment 1: "We need to make sure that we're being responsible with every dollar," said Mayor Quinton Lucas.

Kansas City, Missouri, Mayor Quinton Lucas wants to allocate $1.7 billion in the latest city budget, but key stakeholders worry it isn't enough to do everything that needs to be done. He's also catching heat for a proposed budget that cuts a great deal of funding to the arts.

Jeremy Rothe-Kushel

A lawsuit stemming from the highly publicized expulsion of a Kansas City library patron from a public event nearly four years ago has drawn to an end after the judge ruled in favor of the lone remaining defendant.

On Thursday, U.S. District Judge Beth Phillips found for an off-duty police detective who arrested Jeremy Rothe-Kushel, a documentary filmmaker from Lawrence who sued the detective and 13 other defendants over the incident, which drew national headlines.

B.A. Van Sise / One Second

A little boy in traditional Italian clothing twirls while hanging onto the skirt of his mother's 18th century peasant dress. The two are in a Columbus Day parade in New York City, and photographer B.A. Van Sise figured it was the best shot he'd get that day.

After receiving a box of 35 mm film as a gift, Van Sise, who shoots for Atlas Obscura and Buzzfeed, set a challenge for himself: Take one photo a day with real film. The box contained enough for one year.

Segment 1: Kansas City area officials adapting strategies for climate mitigation  

Since December 2018,  governments in the Kansas City region have been working to make their cities and counties climate resilient.  Two people behind the Metro KC Climate Action Coalition explained how everything from direct renewables agreements to LEED zero standard development are among the tools being used to meet that goal.

The Making Of Koch Industries

Aug 27, 2019

You won't see its name on many products but the Wichita-based conglomerate touches the lives of most Americans.

Charles and David Koch took their father's oil-refining business and converted it into the second largest privately held corporation in North America. Business writer Chris Leonard discussed what has been behind the brothers' success, their past transgressions against Native Americans and environmental law, and their influence on American politics.

Segment 1: A NASA Hall-of-Famer discusses the Apollo 11 mission.

Five decades after witnessing the first man step on the moon, Lynn Bondurant shared his deep knowledge of the monumental mission to explain what it took to fly three men the 238,900 miles to Earth's most notable satellite — and back!

Segment 1: Finding affordable housing in the suburbs can be a challenge.

Gladstone, Missouri, plays host this weekend to a summit aimed at exchanging ideas and solutions to affordable housing problems in first-ring suburbs. Cities around the country are attacking the issue proactively, and some of what they've learned could help ease things in the Kansas City region. 

Segment 1: Where a new mother lives often affects her ability to find treatment

Postpartum depression affects women of all demographics, but those in rural areas are particularly unable to take advantage of certain treatment options. Kansas City medical professionals reviewed some of the resources available in the region and discussed the challenges of connecting those to the mothers who most need them.

Segment 1: The Kansas City Public Library has joined a movement toward eliminating late fees.

Following the announcement that the Kansas City Public Library is no longer charging late fees, we dig into the reasoning behind the decision, as well as the larger movement it's a part of.

Christina Elias / KCUR 89.3

The Kansas City Public Library is doing away with fees for overdue materials starting July 1.

Library representatives announced they will also forgive any previously-incurred late fees. The move is part of an effort to increase library traffic by removing one obstacle that keeps patrons from returning to the library.

Director of the Kansas City Library Crosby Kemper III said they are making the change one reason.

Segment 1: An inside look with the people whose job it is to get a candidate elected.

A panel of political operatives revealed the challenges of money, time and resilience in running several of the recent campaigns for Kansas City, Missouri mayor and city council.

Missouri Valley Special Collections, Kansas City Public Library

Inasmuch as Detroit relied on automobiles, or Pittsburgh on steel, Kansas City once relied on a meatpacking industry that, in turn, depended on a multi-ethnic, low-wage, but organized labor force.

Segment 1: A dementia-friendly KC.

What would it look like for a city to be "friendly" and accessible to people with dementia? We meet a sociologist looking to answer that question and find out how Kansas Citians are looking to implement a solution.

Segment 1: What are local churches doing to prevent and report abuse?

Abuse in the church is a particular kind of betrayal. And it's an issue church-goers everywhere are wrestling with after news in Texas broke of pastors who could still find work despite long histories of sexual abuse allegations. In this conversation, we hear how local survivors, clergy, and advocates are responding to these stories.

Benjamin Todd Wills

Benjamin Todd Wills seems to understand that community is all-inculsive. That is, a community is not just made up of law-abiding families and hard-working citizens, it's also composed of those who've made grave errors and are paying the price.

For years, Wills, an art professor at Washburn University in Topeka, Kansas, has corresponded with inmates. After he mentioned to one man that he's a sculptor, the man sent a paper airplane with a note that read: “As far as a sculpture goes, this is the best that I can do.”

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: One Kansas City couple looks to turn empty lots near the Jazz District into a thriving community.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

Artist Chavonna Adams saw her idea come to life Saturday with the Start the Arts initiative kick-off at the Plaza branch of the Kansas City Public Library. And she was pleased.

"I'm not a first responder," Adams said. "I'm not someone who can just run in and save the day, but I felt that art would be a way to introduce another conversation, another way of doing things, to change the narrative around violence."

Photographing Rock Stars

Dec 7, 2018

On display at the Kansas City Public Library are iconic photographs from Rolling Stone magazine, taken in the 1960s and '70s. The man behind the camera was Baron Wolman, the magazine's first Chief Photographer. His pictures of rock stars like Jimi Hendrix and Mick Jagger influence the way we still think about their star power, and helped pioneer the field of music journalism.

J.E. Milles Studio, LaBudde Special Collections, Miller Nichols Library / UMKC

Segment 1: Control of venerable jazz institution to be decided in court.  

Kansas City is home to three National Historic Landmarks, and an unassuming building near 18th and Vine is one of them. The Mutual Musicians Foundation has been a meeting place for jazz greats like Charlie Parker for more than a century and is known for its late-night jam sessions. We learned about its long musical history and what is behind the latest power struggle for the foundation.

Chris Haxel / KCUR 89.3

Arem Mohammed's white tuxedo flashed as bright as his smile while he sang the national anthem for the first time as a U.S. citizen Wednesday at a naturalization ceremony at the central branch of the Kansas City Public Library in downtown Kansas City, Missouri.

The polls in Missouri will be open from 6 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday. There’s been a lot to keep up on a national and international level, so if you don’t feel quite as informed as you’d like about what’s on Missouri’s ballot, don’t fret.

The following is a rundown of the state’s biggest races — especially that contentious U.S. Senate contest between incumbent Democrat Claire McCaskill and Republican Attorney General Josh Hawley — plus a breakdown of several major issues that voters will be asked to decide.

Segment 1: How do you prepare to vote?

There are a lot more issues on the ballot than you may realize. How do you make sure you have sufficient knowledge of candidates, judges, and amendments before getting to the ballot box? We talk with a local voter who did extensive research and shared her findings on social media, as well as KCUR staff members who put together some resources.

Young white woman with long brunette hair and wearing glasses sits in front of a microphone with headphones on in the KCUR studio.
Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Voters to decide on increasing funds for public library system and amendments to Jackson County Charter.

Ballots in Jackson County on Nov. 6 will be packed with issues. Today, we discussed eight of the questions before voters, seven of which deal with how county legislators, and the executive and prosecutor operate. First, though, we take up a levy proposal that would increase the budget for the Kansas City Public Library.

O'Dea / Wikimedia Commons

Segment 1: Three separate ballot measures aim to allow medical marijuana in the Show-Me State.

Lisa Rodriguez / KCUR 89.3

As the rain fell steadily outside Tuesday morning, a maintenance worker was trying to dry out the carpet in the children’s corner of the Waldo branch of the Kansas City Public Library.

“Water seeping through here is a regular occurrence,” said deputy library director Joel Jones.

Aviva Okeson-Haberman / KBIA

Segment 1: Going "Beyond the Ballot" to find what drives Missouri voters to the ballots.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Will redevelopment on a single block of Troost be the bellweather for how the city revitalizes other neighborhoods?

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