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labor

Missouri Valley Special Collections, Kansas City Public Library

Inasmuch as Detroit relied on automobiles, or Pittsburgh on steel, Kansas City once relied on a meatpacking industry that, in turn, depended on a multi-ethnic, low-wage, but organized labor force.

Segment 1: Concerns linger regarding Lake City Army Ammunition Plant.

The largest manufacturing plant for smaller caliber rounds is in Independence, Missouri. It suffered an accidental explosion in 2017 causing the death of one person and injuring four more.  Chris Haxel explained what contributed to the fatal event and the operation's questionable safety record under the current contractor.

Segment 1: "The state was funding 60 percent of the cost of education, the students and families were doing 40 percent. We've now seen an inversion of those ratios," according to KU chancellor.

More than 700,000 working-age adults in Kansas are operating in the labor force with no relevant postsecondary credentials, while the demand for highly skilled workers continues to rise. The Chancellor Doug Girod spoke to what universities, government and businesses can do to produce the workforce the future Kansas City metro will need.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

When Terrence Wise testified in front of Congress on Feb. 7, it wasn't the first time he'd visited Washington. The minimum-wage worker and organizer introduced former President Barack Obama at a 2015 Worker Voice Summit at the White House.

Segment 1: What's going on with unions in Missouri?

Last year, union membership in Missouri went up, bucking a national trend of declining numbers. But the bigger picture is much more complicated. In this conversation, we take a close look at the current climate of local unions.

Cody Newill / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Local leader of Fight for $15 told his personal story at a U.S. House hearing to support an increase of the federal minimum wage. 

It's been a decade since Congress authorized a federal minimum wage increase. Currently, two bills passing through the U.S. House of Representatives look to nationally hike the least amount paid to workers to fifteen dollars by 2024. We talked about the possible positive and negative effects of higher wages and what the opportunity to speak directly to federal lawmakers meant for one Kansas City advocate. 

Seg. 1: Understanding Slang. Seg. 2: Women In Power.

Jan 24, 2019

Segment 1: An expert panel on slang today.

"Extra." "Mood." "We live in a society." "Fell off." Or, per one recent high-profile Twitter feud, "dog-walk" (verb, transitive). These are phrases you either get or you don't. But some of them aren't even new. We define them while also discussing where they come from, why we call them slang (and not just language) and how they spread to eventually become part of standard English. 

Segment 1: The local impact of a minimum wage increase.

In November, 62% of Missouri voters supported Proposition B, a measure to raise the minimum wage across the state, gradually, to $12 an hour by 2023. On this episode, we explore what happens to local economies when the minimum wage increases and its societal effects.

Allen Brewer / Flickr-CC

The Kansas City economy is growing at a rapid but unsustainable rate, according to an economic forecast report released Friday by the Greater Kansas City Chamber of Commerce.

Cranes dot the skyline and construction contracts have jumped by half since this time last year, but despite a building boom, Kansas City’s economy is not keeping pace with either the national economy or similarly sized cities, according to the report.