Lauren Arthur | KCUR

Lauren Arthur

Samuel King / KCUR 89.3

The Missouri Senate gained another Democrat on Wednesday, as former state Rep. Lauren Arthur took the oath of office.

But because Arthur is taking office before the 2019 regular session, which starts in January, she can only run for re-election once due to term limits.

Arthur was warmly welcomed by her new Senate colleagues after being sworn in during the special session, and said she’s looking forward to the new position.

Kevin Corlew, Lauren Arthur

Democrats have taken a Missouri Senate seat previously held by Republicans in the first electoral test since the resignation of GOP Gov. Eric Greitens last week. 

Kevin Corlew, Lauren Arthur

It’s time to fill Missouri’s months-vacant 17th District Senate seat, which is in a part of the Northland that doesn’t have a clear partisan leaning.

Tuesday’s election between Republican state Rep. Kevin Corlew and Democratic Rep. Lauren Arthur, both of Kansas City, could end up being a bellwether for the general election in the wake of the investigation and eventual resignation of former Gov. Eric Greitens.

Jim Bowen / Flickr

As elected officials processed Tuesday's news that Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens had resigned, effective June 1, and that Lt. Gov. Mike Parson would become governor, Kansas City-area lawmakers and party leaders' responses ranged from sober to slightly salty. 

Arthur and Corlew
Brian Ellison / KCUR 89.3

Missouri Reps. Lauren Arthur and Kevin Corlew are fighting over an exceedingly rare prize in Missouri politics: an open Senate seat in a district that doesn't have a clear partisan leaning. Whether voters choose the Democratic Arthur or the Republican Corlew in a June 5 special election could speak volumes about the mood of the electorate at a turbulent time.

Capitol at night
Brian Ellison / KCUR 89.3

Missouri government is still reeling after a week that saw the State of the State address overshadowed by a report by KMOV in St. Louis that Governor Eric Greitens, a Republican, had an affair with an unnamed woman, as revealed in tapes secretly recorded by the woman's former husband. The governor has admitted the affair but denies allegations he attempted to blackmail the woman to keep it quiet.

Chris Young / KCUR 89.3

Over the past decade, few issues have occupied as prominent and contentious a spot on the national stage—and in Missouri—as health care. It's not just about politics: Debates in the General Assembly, actions by past and present governors and oversight by state agencies all result in real impact on people's lives.

A Not-So-Extraordinary Session

Jun 18, 2017
Matt Hodapp / KCUR 89.3

Back in February, St. Louis passed a law that some say placed too many restrictions on anti-abortion crisis pregnancy centers. In April, a federal judge struck down many of Missouri's restrictive regulations on abortion clinics. And last week, Gov. Eric Greitens called lawmakers back for an "extraordinary session" to pass a bill in response to all of that. But these two lawmakers think the session, and the reasons for it, aren't so extraordinary.