levees | KCUR

levees

Segment 1: Embankments necessary for flood managment can also have adverse affects.

Levees offer a sense of security but little regulation on their construction means they can actually make flooding worse for towns and farmland upriver.  Set-back levees found in Europe allow more room for rivers to run but their cost has slowed adoption of the system in the U.S. 

Peggy Lowe / KCUR 89.3

Water is still on the mind of many Missourians right about now. As floodwaters crept their way down the Missouri River in recent weeks, questions outnumbered answers about how to best control future inundations.

Segment 1: Response and recovery to flooding in the Midwest.

We hear regional reactions to the devastating flood waters now making their way through Missouri, and learn about the recovery effort and how the Army Corps of Engineers is planning for the possibilty of more flooding this spring.

Matt Kleinmann / Community Health Council of Wyandotte County

Standing at the meeting point of the Kansas and Missouri rivers, you can still get a glimpse of what Lewis and Clark might have seen when they camped here 212 years ago: vast skies, tall trees, wide, shimmering rivers, even the occasional eagle.

Rick Behrens, pastor of Grandview Park Presbyterian Church in Kansas City, Kansas, says the rivers are hidden gems.

“It’s really a unique slice of nature in the middle of our cities that’s pretty amazing and a great opportunity for people to get away from the city, in a sense, right in the middle of the city,” Behrens says.

Repairing Missouri River Levees

Dec 14, 2011
USACE Public Affairs

Wednesday on Central Standard, we drive our proverbial Chevy to Missouri River levees, and ask where the funds went dry.

Our guest Jud Kneuvean, Chief of Emergency Management for the US Army Corps of Engineers, will tell us about their plans to fix 11 of the 68 Missouri River levees in time for the Spring, and how they determined the crucial sites for repairs.

Flood Danger Heralded

Jun 1, 2010

Kansas City, Mo. – The council made up of Kansas City's six major industrial districts is warning that levees holding back rivers are in precarious condition. And money to do restoration work is barely being provided.

Kansas City's lowest lying areas are the industry districts, Central and Northeast Industrial, Dotson, Blue Valley, Swope and Bi State Turkey Creek. There are sixty miles of levees between 30 and more than 50 years old.