Michael Brown | KCUR

Michael Brown

Segment 1: While the rest of the nation has seen a decrease in the number of drug overdose deaths, Missouri and Kansas have seen a rise.

In 2018 death by drug overdose declined 4.2% in the United States, but Missouri saw an increase of 17% while Kansas saw a 5.6% rise. Public health officials from each side of the state line offer their thoughts on what was behind the respective upswings.

David Kovaluk / St. Louis Public Radio

After the August primaries, it’s clear many people — young, black and progressive — played a major role in helping former Ferguson Councilman Wesley Bell defeat incumbent St. Louis County prosecutor Bob McCulloch in the Democratic race.

“We’re saying bye to Bob and ushering in, hopefully, a new era in prosecutor politics,” Rodney Brown said weeks before the primaries. He’s a member of a local committee of young, black progressives called St. Louis Action Council.

Updated at 3:25 p.m. Sept. 18 with release of Post-Dispatch reporter — More than 80 people were arrested Sunday night, St. Louis police said, long after the official — and peaceful — protests ended. The last group of people to be arrested downtown were boxed in by police and sprayed with a chemical agent, a livestream showed, and a St. Louis Post-Dispatch staffer tweeted that one of their reporters was among them. A Post-Dispatch editor this morning announced that reporter Mike Faulk has been released.

The parents of Michael Brown filed a wrongful death suit Thursday against the city of Ferguson, former Ferguson Police Chief Thomas Jackson and former Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who fatally shot Brown.

Attorney Benjamin Crump pointed to a U.S. Department of Justice report that uncovered racial bias in the Ferguson Police Department.

Julia Davis / KCUR

From the Country Club Plaza to the federal courthouse to a church at 46th and Benton Boulevard, activists in Kansas City, Mo., protested passionately, but generally with civility Tuesday in the wake of the controversial decision not to indict Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson in the shooting of Michael Brown.

Four people were arrested for blocking traffic and one for assaulting a Kansas City police officer's horse, according to Kansas City Police Department spokesman Darin Snapp.  Otherwise, peaceful marches took place around Westport and the Plaza.  

Elle Moxley / KCUR

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon says the state's response to an upcoming grand jury decision in the shooting death of Ferguson teenager Michael Brown will focus on ensuring safety while protecting civil liberties.

"We want to make sure that people who want to speak, want to say things, march and protest, have the right to do so in a protected way," Nixon said. "Safety-wise, we want to make sure people are able to stay safe."

(Updated at 9 p.m., Mon., Nov. 17)

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon has declared a state of emergency and called out the National Guard to protect “the two pillars: safety and speech’’ that he says could be tested in the aftermath of the grand jury’s decision regarding the August police shooting that killed teenager Michael Brown. 

"Our goal is to keep the peace and allow folks' voices to be heard,'' Nixon said Monday night in a conference call with reporters.

Frank Morris / KCUR

On Nov. 9, three months will have passed since 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot six times by Ferguson police officer Darren Wilson.

The St. Louis suburb that was virtually unknown to the majority of the nation a quarter of a year ago is now almost universally recognized. But for residents of Ferguson, Mo., things have changed irrevocably.

Jason Rosenbaum / St. Louis Public Radio

Police forcibly dispersed dozens of protestors in Ferguson early Wednesday morning after hours of confrontation and the smashing of a window at the Beauty Town shop. Tensions had been running high since Tuesday morning when a memorial for Michael Brown burned down close to where he was killed.

St. Louis Public Radio

On Tuesday from 10 a.m. to noon, KCUR will broadcast Beyond Ferguson: A Community Conversation moderated by NPR's Michele Martin. 

In late August, St. Louis Public Radio invited community leaders to participate in a conversation about race, law enforcement and more following the shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Mo.

Elle Moxley / KCUR

About 150 University of Missouri-Kansas City students marched across campus Thursday evening chanting "hands up, don't shoot" to show support for the unarmed teenager killed by police in Ferguson, Mo., earlier this month.

Seniors Danielle McFadden and Carly Jones organized the event, called "I am Michael Brown," to start a conversation at UMKC about police militarization and racially-motivated violence.

Michael Brown Sr. Calls For A Pause To The Protests

Aug 25, 2014

(Updated at 9:12 a.m. Monday, August 25)

Missouri Governor Jay Nixon's spokesman says Nixon will NOT attend Monday's funeral "out of respect for the family, who deserve time to focus on remembering Michael and grieving their loss."

Our previous story:

The parents of Trayvon Martin joined Michael Brown's father on stage Sunday evening in Forest Park, to speak at Better Family Life’s annual Peace Fest.

 Updated on Monday, Aug. 25.

After a being delayed for more than a week, about 11,000 students in the Ferguson-Florissant School District started their school year today.  

As kids filed into Ferguson Middle School – which is located about two miles from where protesters violently clashed with police – a stream of students, parents and teachers said they were happy to be back in the classroom. 

What Kansas City Can Learn From The Ferguson Shooting

Aug 21, 2014
Frank Morris / KCUR

The shooting of an unarmed man near St. Louis — and the aftermath that has ensued — offers Kansas City broader lessons tied to law enforcement and media coverage.

That’s according to people who responded to our question of the week on the air and via social media: What can Kansas City learn from events in Ferguson?  

“Our police force doesn’t need to arm itself like this is Iraq,” Kansas Citian @OfficialMKoussa answers on Twitter.

File photo / KCUR

The aftermath of a police killing of an unarmed 18-year-old black man near St. Louis earlier this month continues to unfold.

Gov. Jay Nixon Declares State of Emergency in Ferguson

Aug 16, 2014

One week after a police officer shot and killed Michael Brown, an unarmed teenager, Gov. Jay Nixon announced Saturday that he declared a state of emergency for Ferguson, and put a midnight to 5 a.m. curfew in place. The curfew follows another night of looting and damage to area storefronts.

Nixon praised 80 cities around the country that have held demonstrations to call for justice in the Brown investigation. But, he said that the world is now watching how Ferguson is handling the reaction to Brown’s death and the investigation into the shooting.