Music | KCUR

Music

Segment 1: A key player in Kansas City's hip hop community died unexpectedly.

In addition to being a producer for Ces Cru, Justin "Info Gates" Gillespie started the Beat Academy of Kansas City at the Plaza Academy, touching a lot of teens. Now the hip hop community is banding together to carry on his legacy and make sure those teens will continue to be supported.

A tribute to the Kansas City tax attorney who spent 40 years hosting a music show devoted to rock and roll.

Bill Shapiro recently died at the age of 82. To remember him, we rebroadcasted his final episode of Cyprus Avenue, the "smart" rock and roll show he hosted on KCUR on Saturday nights. His abridged final broadcast includes snippets of some of his favorite tunes and reflections on his personal relationship with music.

KCUR 89.3

Bill Shapiro, a Kansas City tax attorney by day who spent more than four decades hosting a Saturday-night radio program devoted to rock-and-roll, died on Tuesday. He was 82.

"The name of the program is Cyprus Avenue, and I’m Bill Shapiro," he said each week in a deep, gravelly voice over the show's opening music, which was not Van Morrison's "Cyprus Avenue" but rather Matthew Fisher's "Interlude."

Segment 1: How Making Movies' latest album gave a nod to Lou Reed.

Making Movies, a Kansas City band, released an album this year that got a lot of attention for reviving a Lou Reed song that never was. We listen to some tunes from it and visit with the band's frontman to hear about his project to teach teenagers the ins and outs of music production.

Segment 2, beginning at 27:52: A book explaining one day in the Surkhagan Valley.

Anne Kniggendorf / KCUR 89.3

Organist Jacob Hofeling started working at St. Luke's Episcopal Church on Christmas Eve.

He'd moved to Lawrence to get a doctorate in organ performance at the University of Kansas and was looking for a job.

"As I was applying, St. Luke’s really needed somebody on Christmas Eve specifically," he says. "So, I worked my schedule around to make that happen." He's now the music director.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Holiday traditions sometimes start in unlikely ways.

Case in point: Gerald Dunn and Kansas City's Musicians Appreciation Day, which these days offers live music for the public and free health screenings and fresh produce for musicians of all genres.

It started years ago as a chance encounter between Dunn, director of entertainment at the American Jazz Museum and Blue Room general manager, and tenor saxophonist Eddie Saunders, who died in 2012.

Segment 1: Annual Kansas City event encourages musicians to eat better and focus on their health.

Segment 1: Reporters unravel the dysfunction that plagues government in one Missouri county.

Clay County, Missouri, residents want answers as to how their commissioners are making decisions. The county is currently embroiled in legal wrangling with the state auditor and the county sheriff, and citizens are complaining their voices are not being heard. Journalists covering the situation say they've "never seen a series of actions quite like this."

Segment 1: Mike Pompeo looks more likely to enter the race for Kansas' U.S. Senate seat.

When it comes to the race for president, The Call's Eric Wesson expects another four years of Trump. However, Mike Mahoney of KMBC sees U.S. Sen. Amy Klobuchar as the sleeper Democratic candidate while Caroline Sweeney is looking at Andrew Yang to gain ground. They also analyzed the U.S. Senate race in Kansas, the early days of Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas and former city manager Troy Schulte's shift to Jackson County government. 

Segment 1: What the junior senator from Missouri can gain from the issues he chooses to tackle.

Freshman Sen. Josh Hawley has been vociferous in his opposition to Facebook's influence, has ripped Democrats for their impeachment inquiry and, after visiting the Hong Kong protests, suggested in a tweet the city's chief executive should resign. Hear analysis of Hawley's political moves and how much they matter to Missouri voters.

Segment 1: New poll data suggests Americans don't know much when it comes to gun-related deaths.  

The results of the latest survey by Guns and America asked people about the causes of gun deaths. Their answers show that more Americans believe it be “murders other than mass shootings" than the actual cause – suicide. Two reporters for the project broke down the survey results and what it means for gun policies in this country.

Rylie Koester / KCUR 89.3

Learning to play an instrument as an adult can be difficult, especially when many beginner level classes are geared toward kids. 

However, a Kansas City class allows adults to learn how to play the violin with an added component made clear in its name.

Drunken Fiddles is a no-pressure and relaxed environment, says Laurel Parks, who started the class in 2015. Besides string instruments, it’s about socializing, making friends and drinking a little wine, too. 

Segment 1: A thirteen year old with limb difference writes a book with her mom.

Jordan Reeves was born without the bottom half of one arm, and she's spent the thirteen years since then proving that she can do anything, "except monkey bars." She invented a prosthetic limb that shoots glitter and looks like a unicorn's horn and she's founded a nonprofit. Now she and her mom are out with a new book.

Seg. 1: Calm Down | Seg. 2: Blues Man

Jun 25, 2019

Segment 1: An interview with the KCAI alum who worked on Taylor Swift's new music video.

Megan Mantia gives behind-the-scenes insights into the making of a music video that's got people talking. From safety when setting real fires to building fake neighborhoods.

Segment 1: Researchers explain the data of who is receiving an abortion and why.

A study by Guttmacher Institute analyzed data from their 2008 and 2014 surveys on abortion and found an increase in the proportion of low-income women who received abortions. The University of California San Francisco conducted its own study following women who were able to receive an abortion, and contrasted the unintended effects of pregnancy with those women who were denied an abortion.

Segment 1: The impact of the Missouri Senate Conservative Caucus on the finals days of the 2019 session.

They've been called the "Chaos Caucus" and their latest efforts have involved  attempting blocks of a tax break bill for General Motors and a prescription-drug monitoring program. Statehouse reporters offered insight on these senators and how other Republicans view these fellow members of the GOP.

Segment 1: A preview of Making Movies' latest album

Making Movies, a Kansas City band, has a new album that's catching a lot of attention for reviving a Lou Reed song that never was. We listen to some tunes from it and visit with the band's frontman to hear about his project to teach teenagers the ins and outs of music production.

Segment 2, beginning at 27:40: Taliban Safari

Segment 1: Kansas City urban core program fills vital role of mentorship.

Kansas City's Henry Wash gives much credit to his mentor Henry Bloch for seeing him as a social entrepreneur and inspiring his nonprofit organization High Aspirations. Wash discussed the significant problems black boys face, the importance of them having consistent guidance, and the opening of his new facility. 

After decades of hearing the familiar theme of Morning Edition, listeners will awaken to a new sound beginning Monday, May 6. But don’t adjust your radio or smart speaker – it’s the same NPR you know and love, just with a fresh beat.

After forty years Morning Edition is getting a music theme “facelift” of sorts – with a composition that pays homage to BJ Leiderman’s original creation, and at the same time instills a sense of urgency in a time when breaking news is occurring with greater frequently.

Segment 1: With only three weeks left in the regular legislative session there are still major issues to be addressed.

From asking Missourians to vote again on the Clean Missouri intitiative to redefining blight in order to curtail the use of TIF to a strict abortion bill, state lawmakers have their hands full for the rest of the session. A review of these and other major issues offered insight into the bills connected with each.

Joan Marcus / HAMILTON National Tour

As of today, Kansas Citians who’ve been eager to see the Pulitzer and Tony-winning musical, "Hamilton," can register for chance to buy tickets.

Since the show's opening in 2015, tickets have been hard to come by in any city where it plays, and the ever-growing fanbase is willing to pay just about anything for a seat.

Segment 1: Supreme Court decision involving Wayfair.com has lawmakers looking at making online retailers collect state sales tax.

With the state revenue in Missouri short by about $300 million, legislators are considering making online retailers, not residents, calculate, collect and remit the sales tax for purchases made on their websites. Brick-and-mortar businesses in the Show-Me State could benefit from the move as well by having a more level playing field on which to compete.

Segment 1: An iconic KCK neighborhood teeters on the brink of change.

Strawberry Hill overlooks the Kansas and Missouri Rivers, I-70, the West Bottoms and downtown. It's maintained its identity as a Croatian neighborhood, despite several waves of new arrivals and teetering on the edge of gentrification for more than a decade. Could that accelerate? And what would that mean?

Segment 1: School boards matter. Here's why.

Even if you don't have kids, school board elections can have a profound impact on the community. We look at how schools are governed, what school board members actually do, and where to find information about candidates.

Todd Zimmer

Kansas City musician Nathan Corsi is in Austin, Texas, for the South By Southwest (SXSW) festival. He's not performing as one of the 2,000 official acts booked at the annual event that began in 1987 — he's part of what's called the MidCoast Takeover.

Segment 1: What happens to a community without access to a four-year college?

The majority of college freshmen enroll at schools within 50 miles from home. But what if there isn't a four-year university nearby? In this conversation, we take a look at the effects education deserts have on communities and how Dodge City, Kansas, is looking to address theirs.

Segment 1: Panel discussion with recent retirees of The Kansas City Star. 

Three senior journalists who accepted the most recent buyout offer from The Star's parent company McClatchey discussed reduction of staff and coverage at the newspaper, how journalism and the city they covered for decades have changed as well the continuing need for basic community news.

Central Standard

Segment 1: Kansas City architect believes we should be in a panic over climate change. 

Instrumental in the formation of the US Green Building Council and its LEED rating system, Bob Berkebile has always kept an eye on climate change. Even as global warming increases, Berkebile believes there is still time to turn things around if we act now. 

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: The only mayoral candidate from the Northland thinks he brings "a unique perspective in getting us moving forward."

Scott Wagner is in his last months as a city council member. Now his sights are set on occupying the mayor's office. Wagner spoke of his plan to fund affordable housing, explained what he sees as a barrier to reducing violent crime, and observed that, "at the end of the day, I'm still that neighborhood guy, and that position and that perspective needs to be reflected in City Hall."

Seg. 1: What Is Populism? Seg. 2: Eddie Moore

Feb 19, 2019

Segment 1: The word 'populism' is being used more and more in national headlines. So what does it mean?

Bernie Sanders, Elizabeth Warren, and Donald Trump are all running for president in 2020. While these candidates may not have much in common, media outlets use one word to describe all of them again and again: populist. In this conversation, we look at what defines populism, and what that word means for politics in both America and abroad.

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