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pedestrians

Julie Denesha / KCUR 89.3

A proposal aimed at reducing panhandling on city streets has hit a nerve in Kansas City, Missouri, so city officials are taking a step back and plan to rework it. 

On Thursday, more than 70 people packed a room at City Hall to testify both in support and against the measure. Proponents argue panhandling has gotten out of control in their neighborhoods, while opponents say the measure would punish homeless people.  

Man in dirty jeans, a t-shirt and ball cap walking along a concrete median holding a cardboard sign out to cars along the road.
Hanlly Sam / The Accent / Flickr - CC

Segment 1: A proposed ordinance would limit the amount of time pedestrians could spend in crosswalks and traffic islands.

File photo / KCUR 89.3

A proposed pedestrian safety ordinance would have implications for individuals panhandling at Kansas City intersections. 

Councilperson Teresa Loar introduced the measure Thursday. It outlines new rules to increase pedestrian safety at intersections and crosswalks, reducing the amount of time permitted to cross, and limiting the roadside space permitted for walking.

Hubert Figuière / Flickr-CC

When a pedestrian was struck and killed in a hit-and-run along Interstate 435 near Highway 350 on Monday, the Kansas City Metro hit a grim milestone for the month.

Pedestrian Life In Kansas City

Aug 23, 2018

With more neighborhoods and municipalities considering 'walkability' as a goal, is the pedestrian experience in Kansas City improving? On this episode, we discuss the obstacles preventing us from having a safe, thriving pedestrian culture in Kansas City.

Aviva Okeson-Haberman / KCUR 89.3

A bikeway along Paseo Boulevard would improve safety for pedestrians and cyclists, but even with a federal grant, Kansas City is short on funds.

The Public Works Department is considering two different designs for the bikeway, said spokeswoman Beth Breitenstein.

Better Block Foundation

The push for safe spaces and trigger warnings is leading many educators to more carefully curate their syllabi. The issue inspired creativity in a Kansas City playwright and the two local actors performing in his new project.

Sam Zeff / KCUR

It’s the kind of story that’s a little hard to believe until you visit the neighborhood.

Just after 8 a.m., a school bus stops on North Freemont Avenue and kids pile on.

They have their backpacks, lunches and homework. It all seems normal.

Except they only live a few blocks from the school and aren't allowed to walk.

It would take Jessica Andrews’ four kids about five minutes to walk to Maplewood Elementary School in the Northland. “We’re really, really close. Why aren't they walking, it’s so close? There’s no sidewalks. It’s not safe for them to walk."

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR

It doesn’t take long to drive a car across the Missouri River.

Depending on traffic, the roughly half-mile trek can take just one minute. But if you don’t have a car, the Missouri River can seem like a much larger obstacle.

According to the U.S. Census, about 84 percent of the Kansas City metro population drives alone to work. That leaves the other 16 percent commuting by other means, like carpooling, public transit, walking, biking or just working from home.

Matteo Merzi / Flickr-CC

Kansas City isn't exactly known for being a pedestrian friendly city. Downtown is overcrowded by parking lots, there have been books written about the city's automobile obsession, and it still only has a "bronze" rating from the League of American Bicyclists for its cycling friendliness.

But there are still Kansas Citians who go against the grain and make it a point to walk. In a conversation with Central Standard's Gina Kaufmann Wednesday, Pedestrian Path blogger Rhianna Weilert said her breaking point came after her car was totaled in a hit-and-run accident.

MoBikeFed / Flickr-CC

Honking, cat-calls, projectiles and more get hurled at pedestrians and cyclists in Kansas City. The city council now is considering a law to crack down on that type of conduct.

Calling these actions “threatening and dangerous behavior,” the proposed ordinance seeks to protect “vulnerable road users.”

Councilman John Sharp is expected to recommend the ordinance at this week's council meeting. He and Kansas City Star reporter Mike Hendricks joined Steve Kraske on Up to Date Monday to discuss the details.

Main Core Makeover Nears

Sep 7, 2010
photo courtesy KCCG

Kansas City, MO – Nine blocks of Kansas City Main Street leading into Westport from the north are about to get a pedestrian-friendly makeover. The city public works department late last week took a look at the 90 percent of the plan that's been finished.

From 34th to 43rd and then spreading out along the southern boundary in the Art Institute District, Main will be altered with added street lighting, planters and landscape architecture.