safety | KCUR

safety

Nomin Ujiyediin / Kansas News Service

Segment 1: Adapting Kansas counties, businesses, schools and employees to coronavirus

Gov. Laura Kelly has signed a series of executive orders aimed at safeguarding the health of Kansans during the COVID-19 pandemic. We asked her about criticism that the measures went too far, and whether she’s considering a statewide stay-at-home order.

Nomin Ujiyediin / Kansas News Service

Segment 1: Adapting Kansas counties, businesses, schools and employees to coronavirus

Gov. Laura Kelly has signed a series of executive orders aimed at safeguarding the health of Kansans during the COVID-19 pandemic. We asked her about criticism that the measures went too far, and whether she’s considering a statewide stay-at-home order.

Segment 1: Meet the bar owner who doesn't think the customer is always right.

Caitlin Corcoran has been a force in the Kansas City food scene for a while now, most recently as the woman behind Ça Va. Her outspoken views on how to create a safe restaurant for both customers and staff have also made a name for her nationally. Does it mean that sometimes certain customers don't like her? Yes, but she's not losing sleep over it.

Segment 1: What Kansas City area organizations are doing to reduce gun violence 

In 2017, firearms killed nearly 40,000 people with 60% of those being suicides. Every year 1,500 children die from guns including those left unlocked in the home. This week in Kansas City, Missouri five persons died in a 24-hour period from gun-related incidents.  Three women deeply involved in these issues expressed frustration, desperation and determination about reducing gun violence. 

Segment 1: Addressing gun violence from the pulpit

Local leaders looking for a fix to the gun violence problem in Kansas City have tried policy solutions of their own, and have begged for legislative action from the General Assembly in Jefferson City. Progress, though, has been limited. Will turning to a higher power help? We ask local faith leaders what role their churches have in curbing gun violence.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR

Domestic violence in Kansas is on the rise.

According to the Kansas Bureau of Investigations, homicides related to domestic violence doubled in Kansas in 2017 (the most recent year for which statistics are available). Johnson County saw a 20-year high in cases that had deadly outcomes in 2017, yet the largest county in the state has just one domestic violence shelter.

“In 2018 we turned away 2,500 people,” says Desiree Long, director of grants, quality assurance and housing at Safehome. That's a 29% increase from 2017.

Many Kansas families may not be following safe sleep practices meant to cut down the risk that infants could die in their sleep.

The first survey of its kind in the state found four in five new mothers said their babies sleep primarily on their backs.

Rachel Sisson, the director of the Bureau of Family Health at the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, wants to make it five out of five.

Segment 1: The plaza's historic look may see big changes in the future. 

New tenants on the Plaza could change the look of the historic Seville-inspired shopping district. As people wrestle with impending change, balancing nostalgia and aesthetics against commercial hope, we step back and talk about what the Plaza aesthetic is, and whether it's something we as Kansas Citians are attached to. 

Sam Zeff / KCUR

Segment 1: Test scores are in and public school supporters are ecstatic with the results.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service

When Kansas State University Professor Sunanda Dissanayake and other researchers studied traffic fatalities in Kansas, they expected to find that more people had died on the roads.

After all, the state had increased speed limits on some highways to 75 miles per hour. Higher speeds lead to more severe crashes. But they did not expect such a deadly result.

Two lines of forward-facing trucks with a man walking away between them.
Tech Sgt. Larry E. Reid, Jr. / U.S. Air Force

Segment 1: As crashes involving large trucks continue to increase, resistance to crash avoidance and mitigation technology remains.

When a tractor-trailer truck runs into the back end of a passenger vehicle at highway speed, there's a good chance that people will die. Today, jumping off an recent Kansas City Star investigation, we talked about collisions between trucks and passenger vehicles, the number of resulting deaths and potential preventive measures.

Charlie's House

A Kansas City nonprofit group is building a house that its leaders hope will help save the lives of young children.

The Charlie’s House Safety Demonstration Home on Hospital Hill aims to provide a model for making a home safe for young children – everything from securing furniture to storing firearms.

“We believe that people learn by seeing and learn by first-hand,” says Cindy Mense, a board member of Charlie’s House, which is based in Kansas City.

Pedestrian Life In Kansas City

Aug 23, 2018

With more neighborhoods and municipalities considering 'walkability' as a goal, is the pedestrian experience in Kansas City improving? On this episode, we discuss the obstacles preventing us from having a safe, thriving pedestrian culture in Kansas City.

Segment 1: How the invention of velcro inspired a scientific discipline.

Learn about bio-mimicry, where scientists use to solve modern day problems with natural world solutions. 

  • Becky Plumberg, educator, Science City

Segment 2, beginning at 14:20: Why a local artist uses lasers to craft traditional folk art.

After moving to the United States from Slovakia, a local artist turned to crafts to connect with her homeland.

Karen Almond / KC Rep/Facebook

In his new play, Nathan Louis Jackson draws on his own life to tackle the issue of gun violence.

Brother Toad” tells the story of two men who are related but going down different paths.

“Each path ends with the decision of ‘how do I protect myself and the ones I love?’” Jackson told host Gina Kaufmann on KCUR’s Central Standard.

Frank Morris / KCUR 89.3

The co-owner of Schlitterbahn Waterparks & Resorts has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder charges related to the death of 10-year-old Caleb Schwab on a 17-story waterslide in Kansas City, Kansas. Judge Robert Burns made Jeff Henry  surrender his passport, but he declined to make Henry wear a GPS ankle monitor.

file photo / KCUR

Schlitterbahn, the amusement park under indictment over the 2016 death of a lawmaker’s son on its signature waterslide, now finds itself subject to a full state audit.

A spokeswoman for the Kansas Department of Labor said Wednesday the audit is set to take place before the park’s scheduled opening for the summer season on May 25.

Schlitterbahn

A second indictment unsealed Tuesday charges two designers of the Schlitterbahn water slide that killed 10-year-old Caleb Schwab with reckless second-degree murder.

Jeffrey Wayne Henry, a co-owner of Schlitterbahn, and John Timothy Schooley, allegedly the lead designer of the slide, were named in the indictment unsealed in Wyandotte County. Henry was arrested on Monday in Cameron County, Texas, on a Kansas warrant and is being held in jail there. Schooley was not in custody.

Cameron County, Texas, Sheriff's Office

The co-owner of the Schlitterbahn water park was arrested in Cameron County, Texas, Monday in connection with the death of 10-year-old Caleb Schwab on the Verruckt water slide in August 2016.

Jeffrey Wayne Henry, also described as a designer of the slide in an indictment handed up by a Wyandotte County grand jury on Friday, was arrested by U.S. marshals on a Kansas warrant.

courtesy the Schwab family.

A grand jury indictment stemming from the death of 10-year-old Caleb Schwab at the Schlitterbahn park alleges designers and park officials ignored minimum industry safety standards in their race to build the world's tallest water slide.  

The 47-page indictment says that Schlitterbahn’s private construction company was co-owned by a high school dropout, Jeffrey Wayne Henry, with no technical or engineering credentials.

Laura Spencer / KCUR 89.3

(This story has been updated with additional information about the criminal charges.)

A Wyandotte County grand jury has indicted Schlitterbahn Waterpark and one of its former officials on involuntary manslaughter charges in connection with the death of 10-year-old Caleb Schwab on the Verruckt water slide in August 2016.

The individual, Tyler Austin Miles, 29, is being held on a $50,000 bond at the Wyandotte County jail. Miles was Schlitterbahn's water park operations director before he left last year.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: How Missouri schools prepare for an active shooter situation.

In the wake of Wednesday's mass shooting in Parkland, Florida, the 18th shooting at a school in 2018, we found out what Missouri requires for its schools to be ready to deal with similar situations. We also asked how parents can discuss these tragedies with their children before, during and after they occur.

A new, widely debated federal mandate requires truckers to electronically track the number of hours they’re on the road — a rule that’s meant to make highways safer. But there’s a big difference between hauling a load of TVs and a load of cattle destined for meatpacking plants.

Intel Free Press / Flickr - CC

Kansas City has its fair share of historic buildings, but they're not always easy to find and appreciate. Today, learn how a new guidebook is bringing these sites to people's attention. Then, pediatrician Dr.

Many news outlets report that last weekend's shooting in Las Vegas is one of the deadliest in modern U.S. history. We take a moment to consider our country's history of mass casualties, and what constitutes as a "mass shooting" by definition.

Plus, how active shooter training in school is changing for kids as gun violence is on the rise.

Guests: 

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR

In 2015, Missouri Statehouse interns came forward to report sexual misconduct. It was a pretty big scandal, leading to resignations, restraining orders and a spotlight on the pervasive culture of sexual harassment at the Capitol. Two years later, what has changed?

Then: Las Vegas. Lawrence. Sandy Hook. Orlando. Mass shootings are part of our news cycle. How do you feel about going out to public events and public spaces?

Guests:

Kansas Citians love their Chiefs. But the game of football has been harshly criticized, for the slew of injuries and the enduring mentality that causes them. We hear from a few people working to change the game, including one UMKC professor who has designed a new football helmet.

Also, ahead of an event at the Black Archives of Mid-America, a local historical tour guide shares stories of the late Felix Payne, an influential man who transformed the political identity of black Kansas Citians in the early 20th-century.

Greg Lam Pak Ng / Flickr - CC

When US Airways Flight 1549 took off from La Guardia airport on January 15, 2009, no one expected it to come to rest minutes later in the middle of the Hudson River. A movie released this month recalls the incident and the quick thinking of pilot, Chesley Sullenberger. Sully recounted that experience with host Steve Kraske in October 2009.

Peretz Partensky / Flickr -- CC

Hardly a day goes by when guns aren't in the news. Even in the face of violence, American gun owners continue to be passionate about both constitutional rights and the importance of guns in their lives. 

We set aside the gun policy debate and invite local gun owners of various backgrounds to share why guns are important to them.

Guests:

While the call of a cool pool is strong during our hot Midwestern summers, staying safe in and around bodies of water is paramount. Swimming lessons for the kids is a big help, but a supervisor who knows how to respond in the event of a submersion injury could save a life.

Guests:

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