superheroes | KCUR

superheroes

Local Heroes

Apr 10, 2019

You could argue that our town is full of superheroes. In this episode, we look back at some of our favorite conversations with "ordinary" Kansas Citians who have done extraordinary things.

Segment 1: KC's Running Superman, Michael Wheeler retires.

Segment 1: Community newspaper check-in with Camp Magazine.

From a continent-wide softball competition, to a ‘rainbow wave’ in local government — there’s a lot of news in Kansas City’s LGBTQ community. We visit with the editor of Camp Magazine, to take a look at recent headlines. 

Segment 2, beginning at 13:20: A local icon hangs up his cape.

Segment 1: Stan Lee's local impact on entertainment culture.

Stan Lee, the creator of the Marvel Comics Universe, passed away earlier this week. On this episode, we speak with local artists and collectors who were influenced by Lee's legacy.

Segment 2, beginning at 35:00: The Baker Street Irregulars.

The Community - PopCulture Geek

Segment 1: Recent development projects will see some of downtown Kansas City's iconic buildings updated.

Courtesy of Hallmark Cards

Elle McKinney has seen the Black Panther movie nine times and taken all seven of her nephews — in shifts — to see the mega-hit since it came out in February.

So, lucky for McKinney, who is black, that her job as a greeting card writer at Hallmark Cards allowed her to be a writer on the creative team for the launch of Black Panther cards.

Walt Disney Studios

The latest Marvel comic film makes way for fresh conversations on race, leadership and heroism.

The superhero thriller, Black Panther, easily topped the box office in its first week receiving attention and applause for its use of a nearly all-black cast and production team. On this Screentime, we take a closer look and explore what the movie says about society's evolving perspectives on race and culture.

We explore what the theatrical release of a new Wonder Woman movie says about evolving perspectives on femininity and feminism. 

Guests:

flickr -- CC

The first modern female-lead superhero film has arrived. There has been a lot of buzz about Wonder Woman, from the female-only opening night viewings, to Patty Jenkins breaking the film industry's glass ceiling as the first female director to climb over $100 million in an opening weekend.

Paul Andrews / paulandrewsphotography.com

"Growing up, I thought I lived in like a black city," says Nathan Louis Jackson, who spent his childhood and early adulthood in the Quindaro neighborhood in Kansas City, Kansas. "I didn't understand the makeup of this city. And not just that, it wasn't just a racial makeup, it was also economic. All that, I didn't get. I was in a little bubble."

Ammon Beckstrom / Erjk Prunczyk / Flickr-CC

  He flies through the air and leaps tall buildings in a single bound. Of course, we're talking about Superman. But there’s more reality in comic book superhero tales than you might think.

On Tuesday's Up to Date, we talk about how the comics have reflected contemporary life and historical events. Take a look at World War II-era comics, and you’ll see a caped crusader shilling for the war effort.

Clay Enos / Warner Brothers Pictures

In a scene from the recent film Man of Steel, Superman is asked why he should be trusted. He responds, "I grew up in Kansas." For the past year, three natives of Hutchinson, Kan., have argued that their hometown is probably the closest fit to the superhero’s: Smallville.

On Friday, June 21, for one day only, Hutchinson will be known as "Smallville, Kansas – the Home of Clark Kent."

Hutchinson as candidate for Smallville

www.larrytye.com

He is the original superhero of modern times and this year fans around the world celebrate the 75th birthday of Superman.

It's A Bird; It's A Plane; It's A Statute?

Jan 3, 2013

What would happen if Superman had to get a warrant for his x-ray vision? Can you imagine Batman in small claims court when his batarangs damage city buildings?

Kevin Howdeshell

In the heart of Kansas City, at the intersection of 31st and Troost, a select few work to transform a dividing line into a gathering place.