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Video

Segment 1: A NASA Hall-of-Famer discusses the Apollo 11 mission.

Five decades after witnessing the first man step on the moon, Lynn Bondurant shared his deep knowledge of the monumental mission to explain what it took to fly three men the 238,900 miles to Earth's most notable satellite — and back!

Seg. 1: Calm Down | Seg. 2: Blues Man

Jun 25, 2019

Segment 1: An interview with the KCAI alum who worked on Taylor Swift's new music video.

Megan Mantia gives behind-the-scenes insights into the making of a music video that's got people talking. From safety when setting real fires to building fake neighborhoods.

Mike Russo / KCUR 89.3

Quinton Lucas has tried to position himself as the progressive candidate for Kansas City, Missouri mayor, taking bold stances on tax incentives and criminal justice reform.

To get a better look at Lucas on a more personal level, KCUR's Lisa Rodriguez went to Ward Parkway Lanes with the mayoral hopeful to talk about spending time in Hutchinson, Kansas, his (rusty) Spanish and more. Take a look here:

Mike Russo / KCUR 89.3

Jolie Justus has built her mayoral campaign around pragmatism and the idea that Kansas City needs a mayor to focus on issues like affordable housing and crime — and focus on growing the city's profile on the national stage. 

And, as it turns out, she's also pretty darn good at throwing axes.

KCUR's Lisa Rodriguez went to Blade and Timber with Justus to chat about her time in the Missouri General Assembly, her four rescue dogs and a whole lot more.  Take a look here:

Chelsea Beck / NPR

President Trump is addressing the nation about border security tonight. Democratic leaders Nancy Pelosi and Charles Schumer will give a joint response immediately following. The government is partially shut down, with Trump in a stalemate with Democrats over funding for a wall along the southern border. Watch his remarks live.

Rebekah Hange / KCUR 89.8

When Dr. Philip L. Stevens, the family doctor in Tonganoxie, Kansas, passed away in 2015, his family decided his office was worth preserving. After 60 years in practice in the small town 35 miles west of Kansas City, he'd delivered generations of babies and cared for just about everybody in town.

Doc Stevens was beloved in Tonganoxie. He was considered a pillar of the community. 

Leaving his examining table, medical instruments and scale just as they'd been for decades, Doc Steven's family created a mini-museum after his death.

Adam Vogler / Kansas City Business Journal

As Andrews McMeel Universal looks to the future of comic strips, it's working to attract a new generation of talent and reimagine what comics could be, the Kansas City Business Journal reports.

Part of the Kansas City-based company's vision involves tapping into short-form animated videos, and it's kicking off that initiative with a GoComics Short Shorts Animation Contest open to the U.S. and Canada.

file photo / Kansas News Service

Kansas lawmakers have forged a compromise to allow more access to video from police body cameras and vehicles.

Legislation debated in the Kansas House Wednesday followed recent shootings by police in the state.

The bill says people in the videos or their families must be given access to the recordings within 20 days.

In the past, it could take months for families to see a video and find out what happened in a fatal police shooting.

Republican Rep. Blaine Finch said this plan would give families a definite timeline.

Stephen Koranda / Kansas News Service

Legislation pending in the Kansas Statehouse would require police to release videos of shootings by police officers, stripping away wide discretion that law enforcement in the state now holds on when and what to make public.

Police, broadly speaking, oppose the bill. At a hearing on Tuesday, the measure’s supporters argued the public — and particularly families of those involved in police shootings — deserve easier access to police video.

The story of the Wizard of Oz has inspired people for generations. And now it’s back again, this time as an animated series on the Boomerang channel. We talk to the actress who plays Dorothy about her journey from small-town Kansas to being the voice behind "the ultimate Kansas girl."

 

The federal government is the largest employer in Kansas City. Who are these employees and what do they do? A talk with federal employees in the Midwest, and what the government looks like from their perspective.

Plus, a local artist is reviving the video store. She operates a VHS lending library out of her bedroom, and she'll be going mobile to bring VHS tapes across the plains.

Guests:

What is it like to go viral? We check in with a few Kansas Citians whose projects lead them to reach "trending" status in the Interweb. 

Plus, East and West 18th Streets in downtown Kansas City can feel worlds apart ... even though they're not. How local groups are working to bridge that gap.

Guests:

Laura Ziegler / KCUR 89.3

If you just want to see the video, scroll down

It's makes for dramatic pictures but more importantly, it's improving the neighborhood.

Kansas City — in partnership with donated services from Kissick Construction and Industrial Wrecking — started tearing down blighted homes Tuesday morning in the 2000 block of Chelsea Ave. It's the second phase of a $10 million dollar program. 

Mayor Sly James says the city will start with 23 homes the  city owns in it's Land Bank.

The Comedy Trio Behind "Drunk Trump" Videos

Jul 20, 2016

The first "Drunk Trump" video has captured over 1.2 million views since it was posted to YouTube last October. We talk with the comedy trio behind its creation and learn what the inspiration was for that and the other videos they create through their Friend Dog Studios.

Guests:

KCPT Television / Heartland Health Monitor

The University of Missouri-Kansas City is a diverse, urban institution with around 1,200 full- and part-time faculty dispersed across dozens of academic areas.

As multifaceted as it is, academicians from the disparate fields of fine arts and medicine have found their way to Associate Professor Greg King in the School of Computing and Engineering.

Courtesy Photo / Bruce Branit

Kansas City visual effects artist Bruce Branit and his former partner, Jeremy Hunt, are getting credit for making the first viral online video.

This according to no less a pop culture authority than Bravo TV, which is scheduled to air a segment about Branit and Hunt's video Wednesday on "Then and Now with Andy Cohen."

In 2000, Branit and Hunt made a three-minute video in which a computer-generated DC 10 lands on a California freeway. They posted it on what was a still-novel Internet:

Kansas City comedian Brian Huther is only half surprised that the flag-dressed front-porch beer-drinking character he created has grown exponentially more famous over the last four days as the "Your Drunk Neighbor: Donald Trump" video went viral.

Found Footage Festival

An earnest woman in a peach blazer teaches you how to facercise, or exercise your face, in a truly bizarre VHS recording. Where did this video come from? A thrift store in Kansas City. It's part of a curated, touring collection of found video footage, originating mostly from the 1980s and 1990s.

Guest:

DVD Gurus: The Anti-Hero

May 3, 2012

Lots of movies have a hero … that flawless person who always saves the day, and for the right reasons … but what about the anti-hero? The tarnished and flawed characters who emerge heroic in spite of themselves.

He's made a film in two days.

And some people will say that it shows. Others will proudly defend the low-budget work of B-movie director Roger Corman. He even won an Honorary Academy Award in 2009 for his body of work.

High octane thrills.  Open roads.  Freedom.  You may not be able to try the stunts at home, but you can certainly watch them there.