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women

Segment 1: Why the Shawnee Mission School Board authorized controversial teacher contract.

Failed contract negotiations between teachers and administrators in the Shawnee Mission School District resulted in the district's Board of Education unilaterally approving a three-year contract. Members of the school board explained some of the complexities of the situation and discussed what options remain for teachers.

Celia Llopis-Jepsen / Kansas News Service

TOPEKA, Kansas — Kansans will likely vote this August on whether to become the fourth state to enshrine in their constitution that abortion isn't a right.

Anti-abortion activists say Kansas needs the change to protect its current abortion laws against potential court challenges.  

Their abortion rights counterparts warn many of those laws already go too far, and the constitutional amendment would pave the way for making abortion illegal.

Where does Kansas law stand on abortion today?

Segment 1: "Tough love, to me, means you love fiercely but not uncritically," said Susan Rice. 

Former U.S. Ambassador to the U.N. Susan Rice recounted stories of her time as the 24th national security advisor, and what it was like to work so closely with President Barack Obama. Today, we take a second listen to a conversation on some of the best and worst things she saw during her time in Washington.

Segment 1: A new kind of Women's March in Kansas City aims to include more diverse voices.

Segment 1: What it's like to be the first woman in charge at the Kansas City Fire Department.

As Donna Maize takes over as Fire Chief, she makes Kansas City history and achieves a lifelong dream.

Segment 2, beginning at 18:30: How a paywall is changing everything for the Shawnee Mission Post.

Segment 1: Missouri's new schools performance report is confusing parents and administrators alike.

Two years of identical tests should have provided educators an apples-to-apples comparison, but Missouri's new scoring system is more of an "apples to rainbows" look at progress. The state's move away from easy-to-read percentile scoring was intended to provide more in-depth information, but the result has been hard-to-interpret colorful graphs. Education reporter Elle Moxley translated this latest format and what it means for Kansas City area schools.

Segment 1: Once invisible, Native American women are making strides in having their issues heard. 

Eighty-four percent of Native American women will experience violence in their life, the most  of any population group. Professor and Muscogee Nation citizen Sarah Deer says facts like this are often missing from dialogues surrounding activism and feminism. Deer says if the focus in these conversations is placed on finding solutions for assaults on Native women, then those solutions will benefit everyone.

Segment 1: Kansas City area officials adapting strategies for climate mitigation  

Since December 2018,  governments in the Kansas City region have been working to make their cities and counties climate resilient.  Two people behind the Metro KC Climate Action Coalition explained how everything from direct renewables agreements to LEED zero standard development are among the tools being used to meet that goal.

Segment 1: State task force on bullying looks to multiple stakeholders for information on harmful harassing behavior 

The Kansas Department of Education has brought together educators, legislators, students and others to garner recommendations as part of its efforts "to better understand how to combat" bullying. The co-chair of the task force discussed how big the problem is, the impact of technology as a means of bullying and why application of the state policies on bullying may not be applied equally by school districts across Kansas.    

Segment 1: Former mayor of Kansas City, Missouri, can be remembered for more than brick-and-mortar accomplishments

With his successor officially sworn in as mayor, Sly James has ended his eight years  at City Hall. His legacy goes beyond a convention hotel, a single-terminal airport and the streetcar. A panel of non-profit representatives spotlighted James' fights for a higher minimum wage, women's equality and literacy in young children. 

Segment 1: American patriotism through the years

Some things never change, like the American need to blow things up on Independence Day. Not as predictable is our collective definition of patriotism. The concept has sustained the country's 243 years, but does it mean the same thing today as it did during the 1770s, 1870s or 1970s?

Segment 1: Jackson County officials respond to skyrocketing property assessment values.

The Jackson County Legislature has asked County Executive Frank White to re-do property assessment this year because of a dramatic spike in values. The county assessor and legislative leaders discussed how to fix the problem, and why the assessments have historically been so low. 

Today the U.S. Women’s National Soccer Team will wrap up the first round of the World Cup tournament. The Americans have embraced their role as goliath, shellacking their first two opponents 16 goals to nil. But the score isn’t the only thing that’s woefully uneven, which, in this month’s edition of “A Fan’s Notes,” concerns commentator Victor Wishna.

OK. Today is my daughter’s birthday, and I promised her I’d say so, on the air.

Happy birthday, Vivien.

Segment 1: Why integration is still important in modern society and how students are positivey affected by it. 

Integration was most prevalent in the 1970s and 80s, but professor Rucker Johnson believes it has disappeared in modern society and needs to make a come back. Hear his thoughts on past integration efforts and the current segregation of schools. 

Segment 1: Ryana Parks-Shaw and Edward Bell II discuss their plans to take over Kansas City's 5th District Council seat. 

Continuing our Kansas City Council debate series, the 5th District candidates discussed new policing strategies, the addition of pocket parks and how to minimize violent crime.

Segment 1: Busking Law 101

If you're headed to a major city, you'll likely come across someone performing on a sidewalk with a hat, jar or guitar case set out for tips. But while that experience is common, the regulations governing it are not. We find out what buskers are allowed to do in Kansas City and how that differs from other places across the country.

Segment 1: Researchers explain the data of who is receiving an abortion and why.

A study by Guttmacher Institute analyzed data from their 2008 and 2014 surveys on abortion and found an increase in the proportion of low-income women who received abortions. The University of California San Francisco conducted its own study following women who were able to receive an abortion, and contrasted the unintended effects of pregnancy with those women who were denied an abortion.

Seg. 1: Transforming American Prosecution | Seg. 2: Where Were You?

May 14, 2019

Segment 1: District attorneys' exercise of power has affected mass incarceration and convicted the innocent. 

The United States is the only country in the world that elects its prosecutors who can exert greater influence over criminal cases than judges. The author of "Charged" explained that while these prosecutors can be the "cause of enormous injustice" the pendulum may be swinging the other way as voters are putting more reform-minded candidates in office.

Segment 1: Expert in climate impact says ending poverty and hunger should be part of our strategy to protect the planet.

The lead author on several assessments for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change  described the social causes and consequences of climate change on the fate of the disadvantaged and disempowered.

New York Yankees

Major League Baseball is staring down a gender problem. And despite initiatives meant to bring more women into its dugouts, executive offices and broadcast booths, everyone — including women in high-powered positions — says things won’t change quickly.

“Look, I think there’s no sugar-coating this. There’s a lot to do,” said Renee Tirado, MLB’s chief diversity officer.

Segment 1: As cold storage fills up, food banks are seeing a bump in donations of meat and dairy. 

A scarcity of space in cold storage sites for beef, pork, chicken, milk, and cheese has prompt market players to find ways to balance production and demand. Hear what led to the dilemma, who could benefit from it, and whether or not food producers will be able to respond quick enough.   

NPR's Mara Liasson

Apr 8, 2019

The veteran journalist's path to NPR and what it's like working the political beat today.  

Mara Liasson started her career with NPR  in 1985 becoming one of the most highly respected voices in political journalism. She shared what it was like covering seven presidential elections and what her plans are for covering the one in 2020. 

  • Mara Liasson, NPR National Political Correspondent 

Segment 1: President Trump's budget proposal cuts $3.6 billion from the Department of Agriculture.

If passed as proposed, the president's budget would decrease the department's funds by 15 percent through limits on who could get crop insurance and how much,  a plan to "streamline conservation programs" and changes to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP). Reporter Madelyn Beck explained how these cuts would affect food producers and which have a chance of making it into the final version fo the 2020 budget.

Segment 1: Kansas women share stories of life on the range.

More women are running ranches in America, according to a recent New York Times article. So what does that phenomenon look like in Kansas? In this conversation, we hear stories out on the range from female ranchers in the heart of America.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Phil Glynn says he wants to be Kansas City mayor because he'd done as much as he could as an activist.

Today, we learned why Phil Glynn thinks his background in business and activism has prepared him to make improvements throughout Kansas City as mayor. "Too much of the focus has been on luxury developments downtown, not on our neighborhoods," the candidate said.

Segment 1: Local concert celebrates women composers throughout history.

A concert by the Bach Aria Soloists looks to celebrate women composers of both contemporary and historical notoriety. We learn the stories behind a few of these composers and the roles women have played throughout music history.

J. Robert Schraeder

Say a woman wants to serve in the United States Army. No problem, right? Women are eligible. But, dial it back 160 years to the Civil War, and consider that women couldn’t just pop into a recruiting station and sign up.

"We know that about 250 (women) were documented as fighting in the U.S. Army, but those are only the ones who were discovered. Historians think it's over 2,000 women," says Boston playwright Wendy Lement.

Wikimedia Commons

Around 20,000 state employees in Kansas now qualify for paid parental leave.

Baby steps, say groups that advocate for families and women. They’re celebrating, but they really want Kansas to join the six states and Washington D.C. that make private-sector companies give paid leave, too.

The Women’s Foundation and Kansas Action for Children want paid family leave that Kansans can use for everything from bonding with babies to taking an elderly mom or dad to a doctor’s appointment.

Luke X. Martin / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1:  Lee's Summit R-7 schools superintendent says achievement gap for some students ranges from 17% to 34%.

Sharice Davids campaign

Segment 1: Women have made strides as candidates, but are still looking to break through as campaign managers and advisors. 

Some have called 2018 another "Year of the Woman" in politics — but not everyone. A record number of women were elected to the U.S. House of Representatives, but many had to fight to be taken seriously as candidates. Today we discussed the accomplishments and future goals for women in politics.

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