Women's March On Washington | KCUR

Women's March On Washington

One out of five Americans is a woman of color. So, why are their perspectives often overlooked, even in conversations about race and gender? KCUR's Michelle Tyrene Johnson hosts an unfiltered, wide-ranging discussion about life in Kansas City for women of color.

Guests:

Nodaway County Historical Society

On January 21, 2017, the day after Donald Trump’s inauguration, millions of people around the world gathered to promote women’s rights in one of the largest international displays of solidarity for a sisterhood still battling for equality and equity.

The DLC / Flickr -- CC

We start a new monthly series in which we take a close look at the news and events that are shaping the unique communities around the metro. First up: KC's Northeast neighborhood.

Then: It's been just over a year since President Trump's inauguration. Since then, there's been an expectation that women across the nation would run for office. We talk with women from Kansas and Missouri who are doing just that.

Guests:

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

One year after the Women's March on Washington swept cities across the world, including Kansas City, Missouri, Randy Fikki's 9-year-old daughter asked him why there wouldn't be a local march this year.

"I didn't have an answer for that," Fikki says.

Andrea Tudhope / KCUR 89.3

On Saturday afternoon, the day after the inauguration of Donald J. Trump as the 45th president of the United States, thousands gathered in Washington Square Park for the Women's March on Washington in Kansas City

Courtesy Women's March on Washington in Kansas City

Angeliina Lawson lost her bid for a post in the Kansas legislature from western Shawnee, Kansas, earlier this year. In spite of, even because of that, she’s encouraging other women to step up and run for office – for school board, city council, mayor or state representative.

As vice president for the Greater Kansas City Women’s Political Caucus, Lawson says a lot of women are intimidated by the idea of a campaign. The only way to counter that fear, she says, is to be around other women candidates, officials and advocates.