Film | KCUR

Film

Laura Spencer / KCUR 89.3

Actor Clifford “Kip” Niven, well-known to theater audiences in Kansas City and a Hollywood mainstay going back to the 1970s, died yesterday from a heart attack at the age of 73.

Niven was known for his role on the 1970s television show "Alice" and for playing in dozens of local productions, as well as his avid support of the Kansas City theater scene.

Popular and ubiquitous in the theater community, Niven cut a wide swath of friendship. That was made evident by the overwhelming shock and grief flooding social media of Niven’s sudden passing.

Seg. 1: Sydney Pursel | Seg. 2: Grant Babbitt

May 6, 2019

Segment 1: Sydney Pursel

A Kansas City-born artist uses all kinds of projects to reconnect with her indigenous roots, and to educate others both in and outside her community. We hear about her art, including a mural she worked on as a part of the new Indigenous Artists Initiative.

  • Sydney Pursel, artist and member of the Iowa tribe of Kansas and Nebraska

Segment 2, beginning at 31:02: Grant Babbitt

Segment 1: Kansas City mourns the death of second major philanthropist in a week. 

Morton Sosland, who rose to run the publishing company that bears his family's name, died on April 25, just two days after he lost his friend and fellow city patron Henry Bloch. Friends recalled Morton's personality, generosity and legacy.     

Seg. 1: UMKC Enactus | Seg. 2: Dan Wayne & Big Fur

Apr 30, 2019

Segment 1: Hacking Hunger

A group of UMKC students is working to redirect food waste so it can feed hungry Kansas Citians. Their approach has earned them global recognition as entrepreneurs. 

  • Andrea Savage, Enactus member & project member of FeedKC
  • Ben Williams, business professor and faculty advisor

Segment 2, beginning at 19:03: Taxidermy On Film

Segment 1: Legal analyst Joan Biskupic dealves into the life of Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts. 

There are many interpretations of the law, and Chief Justice John Roberts has assured Congress that his stance is neutral. A new book on his life and times shows that's not always the case, and perhaps there's more that goes into Roberts' rationale than he wants to believe.   

Meg Kumin

When Kansas-born actress and dancer Louise Brooks wanted to travel to New York City in 1922 at the age of 15, she could not go alone. She needed a chaperone.

Brooks' five-week trip is the basis of Lawrence novelist Laura Moriarty's 2012 book "The Chaperone," which has now been made into a movie of the same name. Moriarty was at the New York City premiere on March 25 and says it was exhilarating.

The owner of Kansas City's oldest independent movie theater talks about his decision to close.

Jerry Harrington has been a boon to independent, documentary and foreign filmmakers for devoting the screens of The Tivoli to their work for 35 years.  He explained how he managed to grow the audience for these types of films, added innovative content over the decades and gifted Kansas City with the opportunity to see many of the greatest films ever made.

Ross family

Kansas City filmmaker Brian Rose spent six years working on his new movie, even after he realized there would be no answers to the problem he was trying to solve.

His feature-length documentary, "When I Last Saw Jesse," details the events surrounding the 2006 disappearance of Belton teenager Jesse Ross and what's happened in the years since. It's among the 174 entries in this week's Kansas City FilmFest International.

Tivoli Cinemas

After nearly 40 years in business in Westport, the Tivoli Cinemas will close on Friday, April 12, according to its owner, Jerry Harrington.

Harrington made the announcement in an email addressed to patrons on Sunday night, noting that he'd opened the original Tivoli on Westport Road in 1983.

"Over the past thirty-six years, as we expanded into the 3 screen theater in 1992, we have brought you thousands of films that I hope have been worth your time and enjoyment," Harrington wrote.

Segment 1: Monarch Glass Studio becomes a community hub in Kansas City.

The glass scene in Kansas City is on the rise. The owner of Monarch Glass Studio lets us in on the allure of glass, as an artistic material, and tells the story of opening a Kansas City studio to foster a glass community here. 

Segment 2, beginning at 21:30: David Dastmalchian comes back to KC.

Segment 1: Should Kansas City move the Royals to a downtown baseball stadium?

The Kansas City Star's editorial board has issued an article stating that "it's time" to start talking about a downtown baseball stadium. In this conversation, we look into what that might look like, evaluate pros and cons, and find out how Kansas Citians are responding to this idea.

Segment 1: Congresswoman Davids discusses her first few months in Congress. 

U.S. Rep. Sharice Davids says that she didn't know what to expect when she first got to Washington, but that she's managed to keep her campaign promises nonetheless. "It's as busy as I thought it might be, but experiencing it is a whole different thing," she told us today.

The Orchard

Between the parades and the green beer with your leprechaun buddies this St. Patrick's Day weekend, find time to get to your local theater and see one of Up To Date's indie, foreign, and documentary Film Critics' selections of must-see movies.

Cynthia Haines

"Birds of Passage," Not Rated

  • Drug trafficking leads a family to war after their values are lost among shady deals and double-crosses.

"Ruben Brandt Collector," R

sonyclassics.com

Cher has asked what might happen if we could "turn back time," but don't do it this weeked. It's time to spring forward with your clock, and more importantly, it's time to catch a good movie. Up To Date's indie, foreign, and documentary film critics have some great suggestions for you to enjoy this weekend, so head to your local theater for one of these flicks.

Steve Walker

"Bathtubs Over Broadway," PG-13

Focus Features

Do the potholes on area roads have you down, literally? Well Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics' have just the ticket to pick you up. It's worth testing your driving skills to get to your local theater and catch one of their recommended flicks this weekend.

Cynthia Haines

"The World Before Your Feet," not rated

Light Box Entertainment

Segment 1: "The same police and prosecutors  who are deciding whether to take your property, are the agencies that stand to benefit financially from doing just that," says attorney in recent case. 

The seizure of one man's Land Rover after a drug sale, led to the U.S. Supreme Court issuing a ruling in Timbs v. Indiana that sent a warning to law enforcement across the country. One of the attorneys in the matter and a constitutional expert walked us through this case and the high court's 9-0 decision.  

H264 Distribution

The weekend of one of America's most anticipated film-award shows has finally arrived. While we wait for the directors, designers, and big name celebrities to hit the red carpet for the Oscars, there's still a little time to see the short films that were nominated — you can catch them at Tivoli Cinemas in Kansas City and Liberty Hall in Lawrence, Kansas.

Focus Features

Update: Feb. 25.

When Spike Lee's "BlacKkKlansman," a satire about race in America, won an Academy Award Sunday night for best adapted screenplay, one of the Oscars went to Kansas filmmaker Kevin Willmott, who co-write the film with Lee, Charlie Wachtel and David Rabinowitz.

Fares Sokhon / Sony Pictures Classics

If you take Punxutawny Phil's word for it, we're expecting an early spring , but the warm light at the end of the tunnel seems far from sight right about now. After two sunny days the roads are covered again in snow, making this weekend the perfect time to take in a movie. And don't worry about scrolling through your television guide. Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary Film Critics have a selection of flicks, some Oscar-nominated, for you to check out. 

Steve Walker

Pages