Central Standard | KCUR

Central Standard

Monday - Friday at 10 a.m.

Central Standard is an arts and ideas show. We tell the stories of people who matter in the Kansas City region.

Central Standard is broadcast weekdays at 10 a.m. on KCUR 89.3 and is available via podcast.

Coming up the week of January 14, 2019:

  • Monday: Orwell Manifesto | Israel Garcia
  • Tuesday: The Snow Show | Julia GoodFox (R)
  • Wednesday: Pre-K | Chiefs AFC Championship - What's at Stake?
  • Thursday: Culture of Smoking & Vaping | New Director of The Black Archives of Mid-America
  • Friday: SuEllen Fried
Paul Andrews / paulandrewsphotography.com

In the 1950s, SuEllen Fried got a call asking if she'd like to teach the cha-cha to psychiatric patients at the Osawatomie State Hospital.

She'd danced in St. Louis's Muny Opera as a teen and she'd made plans to move to New York to pursue a career in dance on Broadway. But at the last minute, she fell in love, moved to Kansas City, got married and started a family instead.

Portrait Session With SuEllen Fried

Jan 18, 2019

SuEllen Fried wanted to dance. She never anticipated this passion would lead her to a life of advocacy for child-abuse prevention and prison reform.

By working with patients through dance therapy, she developed a focus on bullying in early childhood. She has co-authored three books on the subject and travels around the nation advocating practical steps in prevention and promoting awareness. This hour-long interview is the latest installment in our Portrait Session series.

Seg. 1: Smoking & Vaping Culture. Seg. 2: Carmaletta Williams

Jan 18, 2019

Segment 1: Cultural shifts in smoking and vaping.

With smoking banned in most public places — and vaping on the rise among teens — we look at the changing nature of smoking culture.

  • Chris Young, millennial smoker and KCUR assistant event producer
  • Kevin Kufeldt, program manager, Adolescent Center for Treatment at the Johnson County Mental Health Center

Segment 2, beginning at 33:30: Meet the new director of an organization dedicated to preserving local history.

Segment 1: The debate over free pre-kindergarten. 

At face value, the idea of universal preschool sounds great. And that's exactly what Kansas City Mayor Sly James is trying to accomplish with his proposal calling for a sales tax to fund it. But he's facing quite a bit of opposition, notably from the local school districts. Mayor James joins us to lay out his plan, and then school superintendent Dan Clemens explains his concerns with the proposal.

Seg. 1: Snow Days. Seg. 2: Passion For Deaning.

Jan 15, 2019

Segment 1: Fallout from a snowstorm. 

From a missing snow-person to more serious issues like coping with school closures from one district to another, Kansas Citians have stories about this crazy snowfall. Plus, KCP&L explains why some people's power comes on faster than others after widespread outages.

Segment 1: A KU sociology professor discovers a manifesto by George Orwell.  

A new book by David Smith, in collaboration with an artist, reveals there's more to Orwell than 1984. Much of the book is devoted to a manifesto Orwell wrote three years before that celebrated novel. It called for an international organization to prevent "psychological warfare." 

Food Critics: Soups & Stews

Jan 11, 2019

Segment 1: Winter restaurant news

Best meals of 2018, and the latest openings and expected restaurant arrivals.

Segment 2, beginning at 28:24: The best soups and stews around Kansas City

Get an inside look at Teocali’s albondigas soup and the people who make it. Also, the critics highlight some of the best soups and stews available this season.

Segment 1: Four nearby counties are "the most typical in the U.S." according to recent study.

A recent study by Echelon Insights, a research and polling firm based in Washington D.C., ranked the top 25 most typical counties in America. Two on the list include Jackson and Clay county in Missouri, as well as Shawnee and Sedgwick in Kansas, respectively. So what makes us so typical? And what does 'typical' even mean?

Seg. 1: The Shutdown Show. Seg 2: General Hospital #2.

Jan 9, 2019

Segment 1: Kansas City stories about the federal government shutdown.

From an entrepreneur whose plans to open his own business have been thwarted, to the federal employee who made the daunting decision to borrow against her pension. Hear stories from Kansas Citians whose lives are in limbo on day 18 of a federal government shutdown. 

Segment 1: The local impact of a minimum wage increase.

In November, 62% of Missouri voters supported Proposition B, a measure to raise the minimum wage across the state, gradually, to $12 an hour by 2023. On this episode, we explore what happens to local economies when the minimum wage increases and its societal effects.

Kansas City Homicides In 2018

Jan 7, 2019

There were more than 200 homicides in the Kansas City metro area in 2018. That's a big number, but it also constitutes a 10% drop from the previous year's count. What the numbers tell us and what they miss when it comes to homicide, plus insights into what we ought to pay more attention to when we talk about violent crime in our communities.

Segment 1: Missouri native lands first exhibit at the Nerman Museum.

Aaron Wrinkle returns to his roots as a painter in the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art's exhibit "Pulse." Wrinkle has spent his recent years in and around Los Angeles exploring conceptual art through a variety of mediums. A graduate of the Kansas City Art Institute, this is Wrinkle's first museum exhibit.

Segment 1: Local lawyer finds a niche in space law.

Space is an exciting new frontier challenging humanity to advance in math, science, and engineering. But what is it mean for advances in the law. Who owns space? We hear from a Kansas City lawyer who has made a name for himself in dealing with the ownership of objects originating from space.

  • Chris McHugh, lawyer

Segment 2, beginning at 15:25: Instagram stars of Kansas City.

Segment 1: Mark Twain's love letter to American cuisine.

Samuel Clemens, AKA Mark Twain, was an avid writer and traveler. He was also a champion of America's regional foods. While homesick in Europe, he wrote an extensive list of the foods he missed, like prairie hen and peach cobbler. On this episode, we speak with the author who's been following in Twain's culinary footsteps, first for a book in 2011, and now for a podcast.

Paul Andrews / paulandrewsphotography.com

Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado just got back from vacationing with a colleague at the Great Barrier Reef in Australia. The two were taking a leisurely walk along the water's edge when they decided to turn over a rock, just to see what might be underneath it. 

Originally from Caracas, Venezuela, Alejandro Sánchez Alvarado is a medical researcher at the Stowers Institute for Medical Research in Kansas City. We spoke with him about his start in biology, learning English through public radio, and his current research regenerating dead cells. This hour-long interview marks the latest installment of our Portrait Sessions.   

Pexels-CC

On Tuesday, the NAACP encouraged Facebook users to participate in a week-long protest of the social media platform after a report released for the U.S. Senate Select Committee on Intelligence revealed the tech company's history of data hacks targeting people of color.

Segment 1: What would we be doing if we weren't on Facebook?

Segment 1: A bookstore stage for a literary legend.

Tru is a one-man production about writer Truman Capote's lonely Christmas in 1975.  We speak with the actor about preparing for the role and what he has learned about Capote's character. The play is on at Prospero's Books until December 30th.

Segment 1: Kansas City Ballet's first black Sugar Plum Fairy.

Ballerina Whitney Huell is making history as the first African-American woman to play the Sugar Plum Fairy in the Kansas City Ballet's version of The Nutcracker. We talk with her about her career and what it means to have dancers of color on the stage in lead roles.

  • Whitney Huell, ballerina, Kansas City Ballet

Segment 2, beginning at 17:50: Checking in with a new app to connect people with black-owned businesses.

Segment 1: Education and the Holocaust.

What's the best way to preserve the memories and lessons of a really painful past? We'll hear from two people working to educate adults and kids alike on personal histories from the Holocaust. 

Food Critics: Steak

Dec 17, 2018

Segment 1: Deciphering different cuts of steak.

What's a ribeye? A filet mignon? A tenderloin? We talk with a local butcher about the differences in cuts of meat. 

Segment 2, beginning at 14:23: Where to get the best steak.

Segment 1: Comedy is comedy for kids and adults.

Mo Willems has written for Sesame Street and has authored many children's books with iconic characters such as Pigeon and Knuffle Bunny. We talk with him about the many emotions and lessons depicted in his books. His most recent exhibit, The Pigeon Comes to Topeka!, is on display until January 4th.

Segment 1: The forgotten Kansas Citian behind Mickey Mouse.

The story of how Mickey Mouse got his start is part of Kansas City mythology. But Walt Disney isn't the only Kansas Citian responsible for the famous mouse. We'll hear the story of another man whose role in making Mickey is just as crucial.

Segment 1: McCoy's Public House and Brewery is closing.

Westport has a vibrant daytime scene, as well as a lively nightlife, and McCoy's has been a long-time staple for both. We talk about the changing nature of the neighborhood, alongside concerns of security, privitization, and old, historic buildings. 

Segment 1: Autism in adults, from diagnosis to intervention.

Many of the therapies available for people on the autism spectrum are geared towards children, but what if you weren't diagnosed until you were 60? One woman's story sheds light on the challenges that arise for adults diagnosed with autism later in life.

Photographing Rock Stars

Dec 7, 2018

On display at the Kansas City Public Library are iconic photographs from Rolling Stone magazine, taken in the 1960s and '70s. The man behind the camera was Baron Wolman, the magazine's first Chief Photographer. His pictures of rock stars like Jimi Hendrix and Mick Jagger influence the way we still think about their star power, and helped pioneer the field of music journalism.

Segment 1: Should Kansas City's football team consider changing their name?

Segment 1: What medical marijuana looks like in practice.

Missouri votes approved Amendment 2 in November, legalizing the use of medical marijuana in the state. So what happens next? We'll talk about all the hoops that have to be jumped through before dispensaries start opening in our area.

Segment 1: Teaching kids about identity.

Concepts like race, gender and social class can be difficult concepts to address — even for adults. So how do you talk to children about those ideas?

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