Central Standard | KCUR

Central Standard

Monday - Friday at 10 a.m.

Central Standard is an arts and ideas show. We tell the stories of people who matter in the Kansas City region.

Central Standard is broadcast weekdays at 10 a.m. on KCUR 89.3 and is available via podcast.

Coming up the week of June 17, 2019:

  • Monday: Past and Future of Journalism (Repeat)
  • Tuesday: Drinking and Socializing | Sarah Kucera
  • Wednesday: Loneliness + Isolation | Valor Medals Review Task Force
  • Thursday: Screentime: "Always Be My Maybe" | Morel Beer
  • Friday: Ebony and Daniel Edwards

Seg. 1: Not Drinking | Seg. 2: Sarah Kucera

15 hours ago

Segment 1: Non-drinking bars are filling a void for socializing without booze.

Alcohol is central to a lot of social events and environments. It's part of hospitality. So if you stop drinking altogether, or just want to skip drinks for the evening, where do you go? What do you do? And why do the opportunities seem scarce?

Segment 1: Mapping Micheladas.  

The mexican specialty mixing beer with tomato juice has been growing in popularity in Kansas City. We speak with the creator of the Michelada Map about where they are consumed the most in the United States.

Segment 2, beginning at 9:54: Food critics and Mexican food.

Seg. 1: Grocery Stores | Seg. 2: Ryan Wilks

Jun 13, 2019

Segment 1: How are grocery stores changing?

Leon's Thriftway recently closed down in Kansas City, marking the end of an era for a black-owned business that had served its community for 50 years. The closing of Leon's reflects a sea of changes for a grocery industry that now has to keep up with the Amazons and WalMarts of the world. So how are grocery stores trying to keep up with the times? And how has the consumer relationship to grocery stores changed? In this segment, we tackle these questions and discuss the future of grocery stores.

Segment 1: Metro areas experience hotter summers, and Kansas City is no exception.

An urban heat island is a city that gets signigicantly warmer than its surrounding area, just by virtue of having a lot of buildings and a lot of people in one place. Downtown Kansas City is one place that feels the effects of urban heat, especially in the summer. We talk with local Kansas Citians who have studied this phenomenon and how to combat its effects. 

Segment 1: Why does Kansas City look like swiss cheese?

If you look at a map of Kansas City, you'll find little holes of independent towns, such as Platte Woods and North Kansas City. We speak with representatives from some of these non-annexed communities to talk about how these tiny towns fit into the fabric of the bigger city.

Segment 1: In honor of the Women's World Cup, we ask what's up with the sport here in Kansas City.

We lost our professional women's soccer team in 2017. Kansas City isn't alone; the national league is having a hard time maintaining enough teams to sustain their seasons, despite the sport's popularity among girls.

Segment 1: Telling the American story through art by acclaimed African-American artists. 

There's no hyphen in 30 Americans, an art exhibition featuring masterworks by four decades of African-American artists. That's by design. Hear how Kansas Citians have made this traveling show their own, and why the curator who brought it to the Nelson-Atkins says it's "a long time coming."

Seg. 1: Micro-Apartments | Seg. 2: Dad Jokes Beer

Jun 6, 2019

Segment 1: Affordability of Micro-Apartments

Developers plan to include micro-apartments as an option for "affordable housing" in the Midland building downtown. The plan has inspired an outcry from skeptical Kansas Citians: Is paying $750 for a tiny apartment truly affordable? A housing advocate and a business journalist weigh in.

Segment 1: Why we don't fix things any more, and why that matters.

There's a national movement encouraging people to learn how to fix things as an antidote to consumer waste and excess spending. But fix-it-yourself workshops happening around the country are having trouble getting off the ground in Kansas City. Our guests give the spiels they'd deliver at such workshops, if they did exist here.

Political Internships

Jun 4, 2019

Segment 1: Political Internships

Segment 1: 100 Years Of Swimwear

A new clothing exhibition at the Kansas City Museum at the Historic Garment District focuses on the history of swim fashion. Looking back on the past 100 years, the exhibit examines the changes in swimwear fashion until the modern age. We talk to the collections specialist from the museum about the exhibit and how changes in swimwear reflect changes in our society and culture. 

Seg. 1: Food And The Environment | Seg. 2: Dungeons And Dragons

May 30, 2019

Segment 1: Food access as an environmental issue

Seg. 1: Tornado Coverage | Seg. 2: Trains In Kansas

May 30, 2019

Segment 1: Tornado Aftermath

On Tuesday night, a large tornado hit parts of Lawrence and Johnson County, causing several injuries and property damage across neighborhoods. With many communities in recovery mode after the storm, we speak with reporters who were on the ground in the tornado's aftermath and hear from folks who witnessed it firsthand.

Segment 1: Mini Golf at the Nelson-Atkins

The role of museums in communities are changing, from being places to look at art to spaces where people can gather and socialize. The Nelson-Atkins Museum is also evaluating its role within the community, and as a way to become more of a social space, will be offering mini golf this summer. In this segment, we speak to the musem director about the new mini golf experience and the museum's changing relationship to the Kansas City community. 

Segment 1: Busking Law 101

If you're headed to a major city, you'll likely come across someone performing on a sidewalk with a hat, jar or guitar case set out for tips. But while that experience is common, the regulations governing it are not. We find out what buskers are allowed to do in Kansas City and how that differs from other places across the country.

Segment 1: Bob Wasabi Sushi, poke, and food bowls.  

Reporter Andrea Tudhope gives us a look into one of the first poke bowls to hit menus in Kansas City. Then, a food journalist tells us about the rise of the poke bowl, as well as other popular bowl-based dishes.

Advice For High School Graduates

May 22, 2019

Graduation season is upon us, which means celebration and cliché advice. But a lot of the age-old wisdom doesn't quite ring true in today's changing world. Hear about the helpful and not-so-helpful nuggets doled out to high school seniors. Plus, Kansas Citians share their own tips.

Guests:

Seg. 1: Hair And Identity | Seg. 2: Paul Henry Ramirez

May 21, 2019

Segment 1: Hair and Identity

How you wear your hair is part of your identity. We explore a growing movement to recognize that fact. 

Seg. 1: The North Loop | Seg. 2: Molly Murphy

May 20, 2019

Segment 1: The North Loop

The creation of the North Loop redefined downtown Kansas City in the mid 1900's. How has this region of the highway system impacted our city's past, present and future?

Paul Andrews / paulandrewsphotography

As she was dying, Sonya Willis' mother gave her daughter a warning. 

"She watched me sit back and put my head in my hand and she said, 'Don't you cry.' ... It's like, 'Don't you cry. You get the job done.'"

Portrait Session With Sonya Willis

May 17, 2019

A middle school in Kansas City has been named after Gloria Willis, who grew up in Texas under Jim Crow Law. She joined Kansas City Kansas Public Schools in 1953, and went on to lead the charge to desegregate the schools there.

Her daughter, Dr. Sonya Willis, followed in her mother’s footsteps and became an educator as well. Though they shared similar values, it was not until Sonya became her mother's caretaker that they truly connected. This is their story.

Segment 1: Celeste Ng

Best-selling author Celeste Ng's most recent book is about a lot of things: idealism gone awry, the dark-side of suburbia, and just how complicated family relationships are.

Seg. 1: What We Keep | Seg. 2: Kansas City Tacos

May 15, 2019

Segment 1: What We Keep

If you were to pick one object in your possession to keep that brings you meaning and joy, what would it be? An author shares intimate stories behind memories of knick-knacks, baubles, and even scraps of paper.

Segment 2, beginning at 34:21: Kansas City Tacos

Segment 1: Reporting on floods

Flooding has been catastrophic outside of Kansas City and covering the damage isn't an easy task. KCUR reporters share perspective on what it's like to wade into these stories.

Segment 1: A preview of Making Movies' latest album

Making Movies, a Kansas City band, has a new album that's catching a lot of attention for reviving a Lou Reed song that never was. We listen to some tunes from it and visit with the band's frontman to hear about his project to teach teenagers the ins and outs of music production.

Segment 2, beginning at 27:40: Taliban Safari

The Rieger

For chefs and farmers, the arrival of spring means growing season has begun and fresh ingredients will inform some menus around Kansas City.

Nick Goellner, executive chef and co-owner of the Antler Room, says the "harbinger for spring" is an explosion of mint and the prevalence of wild garlic and spring onions. Timeliness is everything when sourcing local produce. 

“A lot of the best spring ingredients have a very short season,” Goellner explains.

Segment 1: Rhubarb and mint in the Springtime.

For many chefs and farmers, the growing season and subsequent abundance of seasonal ingredients marks the beginning of spring in Kansas City. We hear about different uses for two of those ingredients that go beyond cocktails and pies.

Segment 2, beginning at 12:56 : Campo Lindo and farm-to-table cuisine.

Segment 1: Education & Online Curriculum

A digital education platform introduced to a couple of Kansas school districts has received criticism from some parents. At the forefront of the debate is the question: is education reform tapping into the potential of technology? Or are we disrupting a tried-and-true method of teaching?

Segment 1: Debate KC

Two high schoolers from Kansas City, Kansas, made waves in the 2019 Urban Debate National Championships. We hear more about their experiences and find out how our town has traditionally used debate as a tool for social justice.

Segment 1: Local lawyer finds a niche in space law

Space is an exciting new frontier, challenging humanity to advance in math, science, and engineering. But what about law? We hear from a Kansas City lawyer who has made a name for himself in dealing with the ownership of objects originating from space.

  • Chris McHugh, lawyer

Segment 2, beginning at 15:35: Mark Twain's love letter to American cuisine

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