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A People's History of Kansas City

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A People's History of Kansas City

The podcast about the everyday heroes, renegades and visionaries who shaped Kansas City and the region. If these stories aren't told, they're in danger of fading into the past. Hosted by Suzanne Hogan.

Send stories ideas to peopleshistorykc@kcur.org.
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The Latest Episodes
  • Black-owned broadcasters have faced a difficult path in the United States, from Jim Crow-era discrimination to racist practices within the FCC. But in Kansas City, radio pioneer Andrew Skip Carter broke through — founding the country’s oldest Black owned radio company and inspiring new generations of talent.
  • Over the last century, the Country Club Plaza has survived natural disasters, social unrest and challenging economic climates. But how can we reckon the place we love with the controversial vision of its creator, J.C. Nichols?
  • Fed up with harassment and housing discrimination, lesbians in 1990s Kansas City dreamed of a place where they could "walk hand in hand, freely down the streets." So they created Womontown. The self-sufficient community encompassed 12 city blocks and attracted women from all over the U.S.
  • No Midwestern cookout is complete without a delicious chili or dip simmering in a Crock-Pot. But when the device was first unveiled by a Kansas City company in 1971, it promised something more: freedom. Plus, a preview of our upcoming season in May.
  • George Floyd’s murder sparked a long overdue reckoning of racial injustice in 2020. But no one experienced the movement in quite the same way. To take the pulse of what changed in Kansas City, we talked to protesters and police on the front lines, and the officials and advocates working behind the scenes on reform.
  • Walt Disney gets most of the credit for creating Mickey Mouse. But few know the real story: Kansas City animator Ub Iwerks, Disney’s best friend, was the first to bring the iconic character to life. Then Mickey's success almost tore them apart for good.
  • The history of the Missouria people and how a prolific Otoe-Missouria storyteller helped preserve a fading language.
  • In the early 1900s, Sarah Lloyd Green was notorious for sticking it to the man as a feminist, suffragette and labor organizer in Kansas City. Her story isn't well known, but she was a champion for Black and white laundry workers and even started a waitress union.