Central Standard | KCUR

Central Standard

Monday - Friday at 10 a.m.

Central Standard is an arts and ideas show. We tell the stories of people who matter in the Kansas City region.

Central Standard is broadcast weekdays at 10 a.m. on KCUR 89.3 and is available via podcast.

Coming up the week of October 8, 2018:

  • Monday: Janelle Monae (R)
  • Tuesday: Meet the Rennies | My Fellow Kansans
  • Wednesday: First Time Voters - Just Turned 18
  • Thursday: Lice Removal | Steamboat Discovery
  • Friday: Food: Honey | Middle Eastern & North African
White plate with baba ganoush on it.
Flickr

When he was in college, Kansas City author Adib Khorram taught himself to make Persian food.

Khorram, who grew up in Gladstone with an Iranian-born father, hadn't always felt comfortable embracing that part of his background when he was kid. The struggle to find cultural belonging would later be mirrored in his semi-autobiographical young adult novel. Another thing that found its way into his book, "Darius The Great Is Not Okay"? Iranian cuisine.

David Hawley

Hundreds of steamboats are buried underground along the banks of the Missouri River. We just don’t know where they are. One of them, however, was recently discovered under a cornfield near Malta Bend, Missouri, about 80 miles east of Kansas City.

That's where Nellie Backes Mertensmeyer grew up on the Backes farm. When he was a child, Steve Mertensmeyer's mother told him about a steamboat residing somewhere on that land. It was part of the local folklore.

"The story was that's why Malta Bend is named Malta Bend: because the Malta sank in the bend," said Mertensmeyer.

Three jars with amber liquid. The gradient starts with the lightest on the left.
Kathleen Pointer / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: The seasonal nature of honey. 

Like wine, honey a product of the world around it -- weather, region, time of year all impact the crop. Today, we chat with some beekeepers about the varieties their bees in Raytown produce.

Seg. 1: Lice Removal Services. Seg. 2: Steamboat Sunken Treasure.

Oct 11, 2018

Segment 1: Did you know that lice prefer O+ bloodtypes and round hair follicles?

There is a stigma around having lice, but keeping quiet about the issue can actually be detrimental to public health. We learn some fun facts about lice, as well as a non-toxic way to treat them in Kansas City.

Segment 2, beginning at 15:37: The Steamboat Malta is an historic treasure buried in our own backyard.

Segment 1: With age comes responsibility, and these 18 year-olds are exercising their right to vote.

We talk with college students who are looking forward to voting for the first time this November. But first, the president of Rock the Vote tells us what it takes to get young people to turn out to the polls.

The Renaissance Festival

Oct 9, 2018

The Renaissance Festival is something of a divisive subject in Kansas City. Some people don't quite "get it" while others are obsessed. We hear what the 'huzzahs!' are all about from the perspective of local performers. Plus, a look at the latest episode from My Fellow Kansans.

Guests:

In her new album, "Dirty Computer," Janelle Monáe reveals more of herself than ever before. And, in recent weeks, she has been sharing more of her story, from her background in Kansas City, Kansas, to her sexuality. A look at the music, life and persona of Janelle Monáe ... and what her story means to Kansas Citians.

Matthias Herrmann / Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art

It's a commanding image: an enormous close-up photograph of a tongue sticking out from bright-red-lacquered lips, underneath facial-hair stubble.

"It goes against the stereotypes of men and their masculinity," Anthony Moses III said of Matthias Herrmann's "Untitled (Lips)," a 43-by-53 inch chromogenic color print at the entrance to a gallery at the Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art.

Kathleen Pointer / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: After nearly 30 years, Cafe Tacvba continues legacy of pushing the boundaries of Latin rock.

Mexican rock band Cafe Tacvba, deemed by some to be the Beatles or Radiohead of Latin American rock, are on an international tour and it's bringing them to Kansas City. Today, local musicians talked about their favorite songs from the group, what the band's pioneering success has meant to them, and how the group has influenced their own music. 

A visit to the town of Liberty, Missouri and its outlying areas to hear about a growing Mormon community, a legendary teacher in the city’s formerly segregated schools and William Jewell College’s evolving role in the town.

Guests: 

Segment 1: Growing up poor in the Heartland.

Local journalist and author Sarah Smarsh has been getting a lot of national attention for her new book, Heartland. On this episode, we chat with Smarsh about the forces that shaped her Kansas childhood.

Missouri Valley Special Collections

Some Kansas Citians know the area between Cleaver II Boulevard and Stadium Drive as a back way to the Truman Sports Complex, one that allows them to avoid traffic on I-70. But for people who lived in the area, the Leeds neighborhood was more than a home — it was a haven.

“I had the best childhood in Leeds. Because I felt safe,” Earline Bentley told host Gina Kaufmann up on KCUR’s Central Standard.  “I didn’t know we were poor until we moved out of Leeds!”

Leeds

Oct 2, 2018

Leeds, an area of Kansas City that is known primarily as an industrial zone today, was once a self-contained African-American community. We visit with community members to find out what growing up in the Leeds neighborhood was like and what made that area of Kansas City unique. Plus, a look at the latest podcast episode from My Fellow Kansans.

Segment 1: It's never too late to travel back home, even when you're 90 years old.

We visit with a Kansas City filmmaker and actress about a locally-made movie exploring themes of aging, memories and wanderlust.

Food Critics: The Best Sauces In Kansas City In 2018

Sep 30, 2018
Nicole Lee / Flickr

Sure, you know Kansas City has barbecue sauces, but is there more?

Central Standard's host Gina Kaufmann has a theory: This place is a sauce town, and not of just one variety.

She came to the conclusion last year when Central Standard's Food Critics chatted about guilty pleasure foods. During that segment, many listeners chimed in to say that their guilty pleasures weren't main dishes, sides or even desserts, but the sauces that come with those things.

Emily Brown

Emily Brown's lifestyle acutely changed when her two young children were diagnosed with severe food allergies.

“For kids and individuals living with food allergies, it can be isolating. You are reminded every time you sit at the table that you can’t have something," said Brown. "We tend to celebrate with food in our society, so food is everywhere — for the holiday, the birthday, celebrations at work and school.”

c/o Born With Seoul

 Segment 1: Twist on a Korean hot sauce available throughout the Kansas City region.

Angela Hong grew up watching her mom make the Korean hot sauce, Gochuchang. As an adult, she started making it for her family, but had to adjust to accommodate her daughter's food allergy. Today, that recipe adjustment has made it into bottles and onto shelves around the city. 

Segment 2: Food Critics

Seg. 1: #WhyIDidntReport. Seg 2: Life With Food Allergies

Sep 27, 2018

Segment 1: Why do people not report their experiences of sexual assault?

After Christine Blasey Ford said Judge Brett Kavanaugh assaulted her in high school, President Trump tweeted that had it really happened, her parents would have reported it. This has sparked a social media movement of people sharing their stories with the hashtag #WhyIDidntReport. We took calls from our community, and talked with a therapist and local advocate.

How Kansas City Inspires Artist Sanford Biggers

Sep 26, 2018

Sanford Biggers is not a Kansas City native, but the city's history and culture has inspired a few of his multi-media works. As a part of Open Spaces, he has another installation coming up on October 5th. We'll hear about how he's getting ready for that performance, the ways he encourages viewers to take a second look at his art, and how he found a love of painting after a run-in with the law. 

Free-Range Kids

Sep 25, 2018

Is the world today more dangerous for children? Or are parents being overprotective? On this episode, we dive into a conversation about parenting and free-range kids.

Guest:

Monarch Butterflies

Sep 24, 2018

It's that time of year when monarch butterflies emerge from cocoons in our area to join the butterflies migrating south to Mexico. On this episode, we learn what's at stake for monarch butterflies and the environment. Plus, we learn how to create a monarch waystation

  • Orley "Chip" Taylor, founder and director, Monarch Watch

Portrait Session: Olathe-Native Artist Angela Dufresne

Sep 21, 2018

This Artist Is Not In Kansas Anymore: Angela Dufresne's Journey From Olathe To New York City

Integration Of Schools

Sep 20, 2018

Almost 65 years after the landmark ruling of Brown v. Board of Education that desegragated public schools, research suggests U.S. schools are resegregating and, in some places, are more segregated than ever. On this episode, we dive into a discussion about how much of a priority integration plays in Kansas City metro schools.

Segment 1: Recent study by KU finds gun owners are more politically active.

In the past few decades, American gun owners have become increasingly more involved in politics than non-gun owners. On this episode, we discuss the cultural shift in gun ownership and how that change influences the political climate.

Suzanne Hogan / KCUR 89.3

Segment 1: Is housing really as affordable for Kansas Citians as we say it is?

A new study finds housing in Kansas City isn't as affordable for low-income residents as we would like. We discuss the study, the recommendations for improvement presented to the city council and what is to come.

Segment 2, beginning at 11:55: Goat Yoga. Need we say more?

Is there a correlation between the way we relate to objects and the way we treat our relationships with people? A KU researcher has found that when we treat everything else as expendable … we may unwittingly treat human beings that way, too.

Guests:

  • Omri Gillath, Associate Professor, Department of Psychology at KU
  • Kelly Ludwig, folk art collector and author of Detour Art

Lucas Richardz / Flickr CC

A vibrant restaurant scene brings comings and goings. Guest host Brian Ellison spoke Friday with Central Standard's local Food Critics — Charles Ferruzza, Mary Bloch, and Jenny Vergara — about what's new and what's out in the Kansas City area. 

Opening

Catapla / Facebook

If you've listened to any of our previous conversations with the Food Critics, you know that there isn't a shortage of top-notch food options in the Kansas City metro area.

Sometimes, though, you want a change of scenery during dinner.

"It has to have something special that makes you want to get in the car and go," said Food Critic Mary Bloch. 

Segment 1: From the tree to the pie, we learn about the past, present and future of apples.

Fall is quickly approaching and many crops are ready for harvest. On this segment we talk with a relative of Johnny Appleseed about all things apples.

Segments 2 and 3, beginning at 14:56: Sometimes food is worth the trip, and sometimes it is best to stay close to home.

Seg. 1: Unschooling. Seg. 2: Feral Cats

Sep 13, 2018

Segment 1: To school or unschool, that is the question.

Unschooling combines the ideals of Montessori schools with homeschooling; letting kids dictate their education. We talk about the pros and cons with a local homeschooler and an adolescent psychologist.

  • Jessica Mattingly, mother of six, local unschooler
  • Matthew Westra, psychology professor, Metropolitan Community College Longview

Segment 2, beginning at 35:49: How Kansas City is addressing an abundance of feral cats.

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