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Kansas City mayor sues to block Missouri law requiring higher police spending

lucas police.jpg
Missouri Governor's office
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A lawsuit, filed in Jackson County Circuit Court by Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas, challenges a new state law increasing funding for city police.

Kansas City is the only city in the state where the local elected officials, by law, have almost no authority in how the police department’s budget is spent. A board of commissioners appointed by the governor makes those decisions.

Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas announced Wednesday that he will file a lawsuit against the state of Missouri arguing a new law requiring the city to spend more on police is unconstitutional.

The law, approved by the legislature and signed by Gov. Mike Parson this year, raises the portion of Kansas City’s budget that must be devoted to the police department from 20% to 25%.

The Missouri Constitution prohibits the state from requiring a city to increase an activity or service beyond that mandated by existing law, unless the state covers the cost. Lucas argues the new police funding requirement violates that constitutional prohibition.

In May, state legislators acknowledged the potential constitutional issue. They passed a proposed constitutional amendment that, if approved by the voters in November, would provide an exception for the Kansas City Police Department.

“The radical legislation provides no pay guarantees for our officers,” Lucas said, “will not hire a single police officer, and ignores the will and importance of Kansas City taxpayers, instead attempting to politicize policing in Kansas City at a time we sorely need bipartisan solutions to violent crime.”

Kansas City is the only city in the state where the local elected officials, by law, have almost no authority in how the police department’s budget is spent. A board of commissioners appointed by the governor makes those decisions.

As mayor, Lucas serves as the fifth member of the state board.

The push for the funding increase was inspired by a move from local elected officials last year that generated outrage among Republicans.

Last year, Lucas and some city council members attempted to designate $42 million within the police budget for things like community engagement and intervention — but a judge ultimately ruled they didn’t have that authority.

The new law is estimated to increase city spending by $64 million. Lucas said that will require cuts in other departments.

“…conservative legislators did nothing for our officers,” Lucas said, “but now pretend to support the police by creating a policy that ultimately will defund our firefighters, defund our parks and defund road repair in Kansas City.”

This story was originally published on the Missouri Independent.

Jason Hancock has been writing about Missouri since 2011, most recently as lead political reporter for The Kansas City Star. He has spent nearly two decades covering politics and policy for news organizations across the Midwest, and has a track record of exposing government wrongdoing and holding elected officials accountable.
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