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Up To Date

Up To Date’s Indie, Foreign & Doc Critics’ ‘Three to See,’ November 4-6

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Byron Newman
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Amazon Studios / Magnolia Pictures

No one will blame you for tuning out the presidential campaign and looking for a way to avoid election stress disorder while waiting for November 8th to blow over. In fact, Up To Date's indie, foreign and documentary film critics' latest recommendations are essentially a prescription for a weekend full of music, movies and popcorn. Maybe the Kansas International Film Festival is what you need to cure your ballot box ills. 

Cynthia Haines

A Man Called Ove, PG-13

  • The story of a young family that befriends (and softens) their crotchety, isolated neighbor after accidentally flattening his mailbox when they first move to the neighborhood.

The Beatles: Eight Days a Week - The Touring Years, Not rated

  • A documentary featuring music, interviews, and stories of the iconic rock band from 1963 until their break-up in 1966.

Any movie showing at the Kansas International Film Festival, November 4-10

Steve Walker

Gimme Danger, R

  • This raucous documentary about Iggy Pop and The Stooges is also a visceral (and really loud) dictionary of pop culture spanning the 1960s until now.

King Cobra, Not rated

  • James Franco and Christian Slater play rival gay porn directors sparring over a fresh-faced newcomer in a lurid, explicit dilemma-of-a-film that begs a question — Is it good because it's so bad? 

A Man Called Ove, PG-13

  • This dark comedy from Sweden chronicles the emotional rejuvenation of a curmudgeonly widower after he connects to a young family new to his neighborhood.
Since 1998, Steve Walker has contributed stories and interviews about theater, visual arts, and music as an arts reporter at KCUR. He's also one of Up to Date's regular trio of critics who discuss the latest in art, independent and documentary films playing on area screens.
As culture editor, I oversee KCUR’s coverage of race, culture, the arts, food and sports. I work with reporters to make sure our stories reflect the fullest view of the place we call home, so listeners and readers feel primed to explore the places, projects and people who make up a vibrant Kansas City. Email me at luke@kcur.org.