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Jackson County's Reopening Rules Are Different From Kansas City, Missouri's — Here's How

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Jodi Fortino
/
KCUR
Phase 1 of Jackson County's reopening plan began May 4, but officials have not yet said when it will end.

Part of the county's reopening plan is based on workplace square footage, and rules for restaurants are also slightly different than in Kansas City.

Beyond the city limits of Kansas City, Missouri, businesses in Jackson County have their own requirements for reopening that are separate from the city’s gradual phased-in plan.

Jackson County’s reopening began Monday, May 4, with guidelines that differed in some ways from the ones that took effect in Kansas City on Wednesday, May 6.

While Kansas City Mayor Quinton Lucas’s reopening plan has relied on his so-called “10-10-10” rule, Jackson County is mostly following guidelines set by Missouri Gov. Mike Parson’s “Show Me Strong” recovery plan.

Read KCUR’s “Here’s What People Can Do — And Not Do — In Kansas City, Missouri, As Stay-At-Home Orders Partially Lift”

Jackson County is currently in Phase 1 of its plan, allowing for a gradual reopening of economic and social activity under certain restrictions. County officials have yet to say when this phase will end, but it is in effect until at least Monday, May 18.

All staff and public visitors seeking in-person services are required to wear a mask and maintain social distancing. Lobby areas and lines in each office space will be limited to no more than 10 visitors. Only the west doors of the downtown courthouse will be open for public access.

More information about the county's reopening plan can be found here.

Here are some places Jackson County residents can go under Phase 1 of the county’s reopening plan:

  • All non-essential commercial businesses can open with social-distancing rules in place for workers.
  • Retail establishments can open to the public but must limit occupancy to no more than 25 percent of what is allowed under fire and building codes for buildings under 10,000 feet. Places bigger than 10,000 square feet must limit occupancy to 10 percent.
  • The same occupancy rules apply to restaurants that will be able to open to dine-in service. Restaurants can serve parties of 10 or fewer but tables must be at least 6 feet apart
  • Personal services like hair cutting, nails, massages and tattoos are allowed at shops by appointment only.
  • Church services, funerals, weddings and other large gatherings are limited to 10 people. Online or drive-in services are encouraged.
  • Starting Monday, May 18, all staff and public visitors seeking in-person services at county offices in downtown Kansas City are in Independence will be required to wear a mask and maintain social distancing. Lobby areas and lines in each office space will be limited to no more than 10 visitors. Only the west doors of the downtown courthouse will be open for public access.
  • Starting Saturday, May 16, residents can visit county Parks and Rec facilities, including golf courses, marinas and historic sites, but must follow the same guidelines for gathering in retail spaces. A mask will be required to enter any indoor Pars and Rec facility.

Read KCUR’s “Lee’s Summit Church Sues Jackson County, Arguing Stay-At-Home Order Unfairly Singles Out Religious Institutions”

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Jodi Fortino
Restaurants like Eat Up Dog in Independence still must comply with restrictions, including keeping at least 6 feet of distance between parties.

Here are some things Jackson County residents are still not allowed to do under Phase 1 of the county’s reopening plan:

  • Visit the gym or a playground
  • Go to an entertainment venue like the movie theater
  • Schools will remain closed through the summer session
  • No visitors are allowed in nursing homes

The Jackson County Health Departments says each phase of its reopening will last a minimum of 14 days and can return to a previous phase if there is a spike in infections or deaths.

Meanwhile, the state of Missouri’s recovery plan stays in effect until midnight on Sunday, May 31

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