Colin Dwyer | KCUR

Colin Dwyer

Colin Dwyer covers breaking news for NPR. He reports on a wide array of subjects — from politics in Latin America and the Middle East, to the latest developments in sports and scientific research.

Colin began his work with NPR on the Arts Desk, where he reviewed books and produced stories on arts and culture, then went on to write a daily roundup of news in literature and the publishing industry for the Two-Way blog — named Book News, naturally.

Later, as a producer for the Digital News desk, he wrote and edited feature news coverage, curated NPR's home page and managed its social media accounts. During his time on the desk, he co-created NPR's live headline contest "Head to Head," with Camila Domonoske, and won the American Copy Editors Society's annual headline-writing prize in 2015.

These days, as a reporter for the Newsdesk, he writes for NPR.org, reports for the network's on-air newsmagazines, and regularly hosts NPR's daily Facebook Live segment, "Newstime." He has covered hurricanes, international elections and unfortunate marathon mishaps, among many other stories. He also had some things to say about shoes once on Invisibilia.

Colin graduated from Georgetown University with a master's degree in English literature.

As December draws its darkest hours ever longer, inching moment by moment toward the shortest day of the year — in the northern hemisphere, at least — the Pantone Color Institute is striking a defiant tone. The global experts in hue have crowned "living coral" as their annual color of the year for 2019.

Believe it or not, Seattle already has its place etched in ice hockey history.

Once home to the erstwhile Metropolitans, the city was the first ever in the U.S. to hoist a Stanley Cup — though, since that feat was achieved in 1917, it's unlikely more than a few people living today (if any) were actually around to see it.

Now, nearly a century after the Metropolitans folded, Seattle natives will finally get a chance to see a band of hometown heroes pursue Lord Stanley's legendary trophy again.

Just over a month since the University of Maryland fired DJ Durkin, dismissing the football coach amid a months-long controversy over a player's death, the school has named the man set to replace him: Alabama Offensive Coordinator Michael Locksley.

Updated at 3:36 a.m. ET

The Pacific Tsunami Warning Center posted its dire warning just minutes after a magnitude 7.6 earthquake struck undersea in the South Pacific: Given the temblor's location, and its shallow depth of 6 miles, Vanuatu and the French territory of New Caledonia risked being right in the cross-hairs of possible "hazardous tsunami waves."

More than three hours later, local officials could finally breathe a sigh of relief.

Israel has launched a military operation intended to "expose and destroy" a series of tunnels it says Hezbollah dug into Israel from Lebanon, where the militant group is based. The Israel Defense Forces embarked on Operation Northern Shield on Tuesday, surprising observers on both sides of the border.

An independent autopsy has found that Emantic "EJ" Bradford Jr., a black man killed by police on Thanksgiving night, was shot three times from behind during the incident in an Alabama mall. Lawyers for Bradford's family released the results Monday, saying they confirmed he had been fleeing with his back turned at the time he was killed.

Just days after Marriott International disclosed a massive cybersecurity breach, Quora has announced that it, too, has been attacked by hackers. The popular question-and-answer website said Monday that a "malicious third party" may have lifted the account information of some 100 million users.

If you take the long view, international health organizations have much to be encouraged about when it comes to the global fight against measles. From 2000 to 2017, for instance, the annual number of measles-related deaths dropped 80 percent — from a toll of over half a million to just under 110,000 last year.

For the second time in three years, life expectancy in the U.S. has ticked downward. In three reports issued Thursday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention laid out a series of statistics that revealed some troubling trend lines — including rapidly increasing rates of death from drug overdoses and suicide.

CDC Director Robert Redfield described the data as "troubling."

The tragic phone call came in Friday morning.

That's when Ballybrack FC, an amateur Dublin soccer team, told league officials that one of its players had been killed in a traffic accident on his way home from practice. Fernando LaFuente, sadly, had played his last game.

When Hassan Al Kontar posted his first videos to Twitter, slouched in a chair in Kuala Lumpur International Airport, his hair was clipped short. His beard was trimmed neatly, his sweatshirt freshly laundered. Only his eyes, for the moment, betrayed a certain creeping despair.

Deep in the grips of an Ebola outbreak, the Democratic Republic of the Congo has embarked on an "important step" toward finding an effective treatment for the deadly virus. The World Health Organization said the country has launched the first-ever multidrug clinical trial for potential Ebola treatments.

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

Several Google employees have gone public with their opposition to the tech giant's plans for building a search engine tailored to China's censorship demands.

The project, code-named Dragonfly, would block certain websites and search terms determined by the Chinese government — a move that, according to a growing number of workers at Google, is tantamount to enabling "state surveillance."

Over the weekend a hiker was tramping across Stewart Island, a remote locale in New Zealand's far southern regions, when the crest of a hill brought an unsettling vista into view: scores of dead pilot whales washed ashore on the beach.

When President Trump jumped on a televised Thanksgiving conference call with the military, he fittingly opened with a list of things for which he is thankful: the sacrifices made by service members and their families. Their implacable leadership. Their toughness. Their heroism, perseverance and strength.

And after several good-natured chats with high-ranking officers stationed around the world, the president said farewell with one more word of thanks and hung up.

Updated at 2:30 a.m. ET on Friday

On the evening before Thanksgiving, some Southern California residents got something they haven't had for awhile: a little good news. The state's Department of Forestry and Fire Protection announced that the Woolsey Fire has now been fully contained.

When the sun rose over California on Friday, it found a state substantially changed from just a week ago. A pair of wildfires, both to the north and south, have killed dozens of people, left hundreds more missing and reduced the entire community of Paradise to smoldering ash and ruin.

Amid all the destruction, life goes on, albeit substantially changed.

Updated at 12:00 p.m. ET

The U.S. government may be preparing criminal charges against WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, according to suggestions in a document filed in an unrelated case.

Assange's name appeared at least twice in papers filed in the Eastern District Court of Virginia, both times appearing to say that Assange has already been made the subject of his own case.

Prosecutors in Virginia say the court document was an error.

Updated at 1:22 p.m. ET

Already reeling from a string of protests and resignations, British Prime Minister Theresa May is fighting for more than the draft Brexit deal she has negotiated with the European Union. With a mutiny afoot within her own Conservative Party, the prime minister may be battling for her political life, as well.

With just months to go before the U.K. leaves the European Union, the two governments have agreed on a draft of what exactly that withdrawal will look like. The British prime minister's office announced the tentative agreement Tuesday without offering details about the deal hashed out with EU negotiators in Brussels.

The specifics will likely surface only after members of the U.K. Cabinet are consulted. Any agreement requires the approval of Parliament as well as all 27 remaining EU member states.

Less than three weeks after Sri Lankan President Maithripala Sirisena shocked the country by sacking his prime minister and suspending Parliament, his bid to consolidate power has hit a major speed bump: the country's Supreme Court.

Updated Saturday at 9 a.m. ET

Officials in California say that nine people have died in the fast-moving Camp Fire near the small town of Paradise, Calif., population 27,000, which has been all but wiped off the map and its buildings reduced to ruin.

Updated at 2:05 p.m. ET

Sgt. Ron Helus was on the phone with his wife when the reports of gunfire started streaming into the Ventura County Sheriff's Office. It was around 11:20 p.m. PT Wednesday, and a gunman had opened fire at the Borderline Bar & Grill.

The Catholic Church in Guam has announced plans to file Chapter 11 bankruptcy, in an attempt to cope with the scores of sexual abuse claims against clergy in the U.S. territory. Archbishop Michael Byrnes said the Archdiocese of Agana settled on the move as the most expedient way to support the alleged victims.

Updated Nov. 8 at 1:48 p.m. ET

As Election Day gave way to the early morning hours Wednesday, the bruising, often bitter race to become Georgia's next governor continued to defy a ready resolution. With nearly all votes counted, Georgia Secretary of State Brian Kemp enjoyed a slim lead — but his defiant Democratic opponent, former state lawmaker Stacey Abrams, has vowed to push on in hopes of a runoff election.

Roughly two days remain until the full measure of U.S. sanctions snap back into place against Iran. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo told reporters Friday that, come 12 a.m. ET Monday, the economic penalties leveled on the Iranian regime will return to levels unseen since the U.S. negotiated the 2015 multilateral nuclear deal.

The Trump administration has called for a cease-fire in Yemen, where years of violence have left thousands dead and millions more facing full-blown famine. Both Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Secretary of Defense Jim Mattis asked combatants to come to the negotiating table for peace talks within a month.

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