Jason Rosenbaum | KCUR

Jason Rosenbaum

Since entering the world of professional journalism in 2006, Jason Rosenbaum dove head first into the world of politics, policy and even rock and roll music. A graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism, Rosenbaum spent more than four years in the Missouri State Capitol writing for the Columbia Daily Tribune, Missouri Lawyers Media and the St. Louis Beacon. Since moving to St. Louis in 2010, Rosenbaum's work appeared in Missouri Lawyers Media, the St. Louis Business Journal and the Riverfront Times' music section. He also served on staff at the St. Louis Beacon as a politics reporter. Rosenbaum lives in Richmond Heights with with his wife Lauren Todd, an engineering librarian at Washington University. They have two sons, Brandon Todd Rosenbaum and Declan Todd Rosenbaum.

As the Missouri General Assembly hits its week-long spring break, lawmakers are mulling over what they’ve accomplished so far — and bracing for an array of items that haven’t reached the legislative finish line.

While lawmakers in both the House and Senate have been able to tackle issues that have historically stalled, such as curtailing the low-income housing tax-credit program, priorities that Gov. Mike Parson holds near and dear have run into opposition from his own party.

Missouri legislators gave first-round approval Wednesday to a bill that would allow medical marijuana patients to expunge pot-related offenses from their records.

It’s an outgrowth of a voter-approved decision in November legalizing marijuana for medicinal use.

A Missouri House committee gave the green light Tuesday to legislation that would alter how colleges and universities deal with accusations of sexual assault or harassment.

The initial passage of Rep. Dean Dohrman’s bill comes amid a heightened effort to overhaul what’s known as the Title IX process.

Secretary of State Jay Ashcroft has ended an investigation into whether U.S. Sen. Josh Hawley used the attorney general’s office to boost his Senate bid, concluding there’s not “reasonable trustworthy information that an offense has been committed.”

A state representative from St. Louis County is stepping down to take on a key role in the Missouri Republican Party.

Rep. Jean Evans, R-Manchester, will be resigning soon to be the Missouri GOP’s executive director. Evans will be slated to run the party’s day-to-day operations and follow through on Republican goals.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson is scaling down the agencies and employees the Department of Economic Development oversees in an effort to better target its mission.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson delivered his first State of the State address Wednesday, giving the GOP chief executive a chance to detail an ambitious agenda for state government.

Parson took the opportunity to flesh out his main priorities of bolstering workforce-development programs and improving roads and bridges. He told lawmakers that he wants to reorient economic-development programs to train people for local jobs — and fight opioid abuse and boost money for drug courts.

Missouri lawmakers gaveled themselves into session on Wednesday, marking what could be a legislative session full of complex policy with the usual politics thrown in the mix.

As was the case in the past two years, Republicans hold commanding majorities in the House and Senate. And the leaders of both chambers have similar priorities, including paring down business and lawsuit regulations.

Just two months ago, Missouri voters approved a constitutional amendment to change how the state draws legislative boundaries. The state's lawmakers, who return to session this week, aren't having it and may seek to nix or rewrite the anti-gerrymandering law.

Missouri was one of four states where voters last year decided to make significant changes to the redistricting process in the name of curbing partisanship and reducing political influence on legislative and congressional maps.

The Missouri House committee tasked with investigating former Gov. Eric Greitens’ conduct released its final report on Monday — and a renewed a call for action by the state ethics commission.

As he prepares to succeed Josh Hawley as Missouri’s attorney general, Eric Schmitt is considering changes to a report his agency produces aimed at tracking racial profiling in vehicle stops.

Gov. Mike Parson selected House Budget Chairman Scott Fitzpatrick to be state treasurer.

The 31-year-old Barry County Republican will succeed Eric Schmitt, who Parson selected to be Attorney General. It’s the third statewide vacancy that Parson has filled since taking office on June 1.

After roughly six months as governor, Mike Parson is not only settling into the job — he’s charting out an ambitious policy agenda.

In a wide-ranging interview with St. Louis Public Radio, Parson laid out his priorities. Much of his agenda centers around developing jobs and finding more money for roads and bridges. But it also includes overhauling state programs that already require a lot of money — or have elicited controversy in the past.

David Kovaluk / St. Louis Public Radio file photo

Since the end of the 2018 election season, Missouri lawmakers from both parties have openly discussed trying to alter ballot items that voters approved this month — especially a constitutional amendment overhauling state legislative redistricting.

But legislators appear to have little appetite to revisit right to work, which voters overwhelmingly repealed during the August primary.

One key responsibility of being Missouri governor is getting to fill vacancies in state and local governments — including times when there’s an opening at a coveted statewide office.

So after appointing a lieutenant governor and attorney general, Gov. Mike Parson will get yet another chance to fill a statewide vacancy. That’s because he picked state Treasurer Eric Schmitt to replace soon-to-be former Attorney General Josh Hawley.

Out of all the items on the Nov. 6 ballot, Clean Missouri is creating some of the most unusual partners in recent Missouri political history.

Proponents of the measure, on the ballot as Amendment 1, include left-of-center activists who helped write and fund the initiative, as well as some current and former GOP officials. Clean Missouri backers believe that the amendment will make lawmakers more responsive to people instead of special interest groups or lobbyists.

It was less than two years ago that Josh Hawley did something no other Republican has accomplished in 28 years: Prevail in an attorney general’s race.

This November, Republicans are banking on Hawley to accomplish another milestone in defeating U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill. It’s an outcome that could determine whether the GOP retains control of the U.S. Senate and showcase whether Missouri is completely out of reach for the Democratic Party.

Missouri House Speaker Todd Richardson will leave the Statehouse to oversee management of the state’s low-income health-insurance program.

Gov. Mike Parson on Monday appointed Richardson, 41, director of MO HealthNet. The appointment will take effect Nov. 1, about two months before Richardson's term in the House was to end.

Both of Missouri’s senators want their colleagues to investigate allegations of sexual assault against President Donald Trump’s Supreme Court nominee.

It comes as Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination to the high court was expected to get a key vote later this week.

There’s one person who will affect Missouri’s U.S. Senate race more than a pointed attack ad or dumptrucks full of money: President Donald Trump.

Both U.S. Sen. Claire McCaskill and Attorney General Josh Hawley believe he’ll make an impact in their nationally-watched contest.

The question, though, is who will benefit?

A federal appeals court ruled Monday that Missouri can’t prevent any political action committee from donating to another political action committee.

The decision from the 8th District Court of Appeals could make it permanently more difficult to track the true source of donations to PACs — entities that have become much more powerful since the passage of campaign donation limits.

GOP Senate candidate Josh Hawley is pushing for a major overhaul of the earned income tax credit, one of the federal government’s most popular programs aimed at helping the working poor.

In an interview with St. Louis Public Radio, Hawley said he wants to instead deliver a wage boost directly in the paychecks of low and moderate income workers.

Lt. Gov. Mike Parson set forth on a new chapter in Missouri political history by becoming the state’s 57th governor — promising to stabilize a state government rocked by departing-Gov. Eric Greitens’ scandals.

Parson, 62, took the oath of office shortly after 5:30 p.m., Friday.

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens, who once aspired for national office, has announced he will resign after months of swirling controversy surrounding an extramarital affair and subsequent investigations about his campaign finances.

Greitens said Tuesday afternoon from his office in Jefferson City that he will step down at 5 p.m. on Friday. The move will elevate Lt. Gov. Mike Parson, a former Republican state lawmaker, to the governor’s office.

"I came to office to fight for the people of Missouri, to fight for the forgotten," Greitens said. "I love Missouri. And I love our people. That love remains."

The woman at the center of a scandal that has rocked Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens has spoken out publicly for the first time, saying she’s been dragged into a fight she didn’t want.

“I wasn’t out to get anyone,” the woman told 5 on your Side TV in

an exclusive interview aired at 10 p.m. Monday. “I was really just trying to live my life.”

Jackson County Prosecutor Jean Peters Baker will serve as a special prosecutor in the invasion of privacy case against Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens

The move comes as St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner bowed out on Monday from being involved in the matter. And the decision to appoint a special prosecutor left open the possibility that Greitens could be charged with another offense.

In a saga that’s featured twists, turns, drama and intrigue, St. Louis Circuit Attorney Kim Gardner’s decision to drop a felony invasion of privacy charge was genuinely surprising.

Updated at 8:00 p.m. May 10 with more information from the first day — Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens was in a St. Louis courtroom Thursday watching jury selection for his upcoming invasion of privacy trial slowly unfold.

Wearing a business suit and a purple tie, Greitens spent most of the day quietly conferring with his attorneys. He’s accused of taking a photograph of a woman with whom he had an affair without her consent — and placing it in a position to be accessed by a computer.

Gov. Eric Greitens is in danger of becoming the first Missouri governor ever to be impeached.

That’s because members of the House and Senate have gathered enough signatures to call a special session that would include considering impeaching the GOP governor, who is facing two felony charges and a full collapse of his political support.

The publisher of a political newspaper delivered $50,000 in cash to the attorney of a key witness in Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ felony invasion of privacy case.

While the source of that money wasn’t disclosed in court on Monday, Greitens’ attorney noted Scott Faughn’s connections to an interest group that the governor greatly upset.

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