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Up To Date

Freed Employees Make More Money (For Your Company, That Is)

If people can be free to act in the best interest of their company, the results will be tremendous, says business school professor Isaac Getz.

Today Getz joins Steve Kraske to talk about his book Freedom, Inc.: The Remarkable, No-Cost Way to Lead Your Business to Higher Producitivyt, Profits, and Growth.  Citing real world examples from companies such as Harley-Davidson and Sun Hydraulics, Getz tells us how innovation rises as often from the factory floor as it emerges from the corner office.

Isaac Getz speaks this evening at 6:30 at the Kansas City Library Central branch. A reception precedes the program at 6 p.m. Click here for more information.  This event is co-sponsored by the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation. 

Isaac Getz is Professor at the top-ranked ESCP Europe Business School with campuses in Paris, London, Berlin, Madrid, and Turin. He was formerly Visiting Professor at Cornell and Stanford Universities and at the University of Massachusetts.

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Steve Kraske is the host of KCUR's Up To Date. Follow him on Twitter @stevekraske.
After growing up on the east coast and spending his first professional years in classical music, Stephen moved to Kansas City in 1995 expecting to leave after a few years. (Clearly that didn't happen.) More than two decades and three kids later, he doesn't regret his decision to stick around. Stephen began his career in public radio as a classical music host. As the founding producer of Up to Date with Steve Kraske, he received a number of local and national awards for his work on the program. Since 2014 he's overseen KCUR's broadcast operations. When Stephen isn't at KCUR's studios, he's probably adding more stamps to his passport with his KU professor wife and their three kids. His son almost made him cry during a drive through the Rockies when he said at age 8: "Dad, can we listen to public radio?" Sniff sniff.