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Segment 1: A KU professor's book explores the sense of place created by our technology.

Where do you live? What is your neighborhood? Is it a physical place — or a digital one? "The Digital City: Media and the Social Production of Place" argues that smartphones are replacing cities. It also looks into how smart cities, like Kansas City, privilege people who already have a lot of resources.

Segment 1: Research shows white-sounding names curry favor in academic settings.

Xian Zhao's name means something to him. It means something to his parents. That's why he won't adopt what he calls an "anglo name." But his own research suggests he might be missing opportunities because of that.

  • Xian Zhao, researcher, University of Toronto

Segment 2, beginning at 14:47: A recent Calvin Arsenia album is a milestone in his professional and personal growth.

Segment 1: If Kansas City wants to go green, we have to drive less. Can we do it?

Transportation is the biggest source of carbon dioxide emissions in the United States, with most of that coming from cars and trucks, but how realistic is it to expect people to break up with their cars in a city that was built for the automobile?

Segment 1: Why former college athletes care that future college athletes might financially benefit from their name and image.

Many think statements by the NCAA are a step forward since student athletes bring in millions for their respective universities, but others say it's not enough of a step.

Segment 1: Climate change affects people unequally. 

We talk about what this inequality looks like when it comes to housing, the needs of low-income residents, and more.

Segment 1: Missouri's new schools performance report is confusing parents and administrators alike.

Two years of identical tests should have provided educators an apples-to-apples comparison, but Missouri's new scoring system is more of an "apples to rainbows" look at progress. The state's move away from easy-to-read percentile scoring was intended to provide more in-depth information, but the result has been hard-to-interpret colorful graphs. Education reporter Elle Moxley translated this latest format and what it means for Kansas City area schools.

Chris Neal / For the Kansas News Service

LAWRENCE, Kansas — Faculty, students and alumni are pleading with the University of Kansas not to ax a teacher-training center slated to become the next victim of major budget cuts — or at least to extend its life a few more semesters.

KU announced earlier this month that the Center for STEM Learning will close in June. Students say they were blindsided, and that KU’s promise to create a more cost-effective path for math and science teachers doesn’t satisfy them.

Segment 1: A KU researcher's studies provide context for news from the Amazon.

As global leaders gather for a climate change summit, a KU researcher shares new satellite-based data on the impact of deforestation in the Amazon, with particular insights into where this year's fire (which is still raging) fits in, both environmentally and politically. 

Segment 1: USDA research facilities will relocate to Kansas City area.

The headquarters of the Economic Research Service and the National Institute of Food and Agriculture will soon move to Kansas City. We discussed the news with the Kansas City Area Development Council and heard from U.S. Reps. Sharice Davids and Emanuel Cleaver.

Seg. 1: Jayhawks' Adidas Contract | Seg. 2: KCPD 911 Dispatcher

May 8, 2019

Segment 1: Implications behind Jayhawks signing the $196 million deal. 

The University of Kansas renewed its contract with Adidas, even after the company entangled the school's athletic department in an FBI investigation of illegal payments to recruits' families. A look at why KU stayed with Adidas and "the business of college basketball."

Seg. 1: The Sundry Is Closing | Seg. 2: Making Friends (R)

Apr 30, 2019

Segment 1: The Sundry Is Closing

Four years ago, an innovative market and restaurant opened in Kansas City with the goal of supporting local, sustainable food. But now it's closing, and we visit with the entrepreneur who started it to find what he's learned about the viability of the local food system.

Segment 2, beginning at 10:25: Making Friends (R)

Segment 1: Monarch Glass Studio becomes a community hub in Kansas City.

The glass scene in Kansas City is on the rise. The owner of Monarch Glass Studio lets us in on the allure of glass, as an artistic material, and tells the story of opening a Kansas City studio to foster a glass community here. 

Segment 2, beginning at 21:30: David Dastmalchian comes back to KC.

Segment 1: Are you using your phone to read this? Us too.

A cell phone today is basically just as important as our wallet and keys; we do not want to leave the house without it. But is this reliance actually an addiction? We talk with parents and smartphone users about why phones are so addictive and how they are affecting our moods, motivations, and parenting.

Dirk / Flickr - CC

The calendar has turned to March, and with it come certain expectations. For example, temperatures above freezing, and the Kansas Jayhawks cruising to another Big 12 title. But this year — not so much. Commentator Victor Wishna faces the cold reality in this month’s edition of “A Fan’s Notes.”

When the Kansas Jayhawks take on the Oklahoma Sooners tonight, they will do so as underdogs. Not in the game — they’re slight favorites. But the odds that they will win their record 15th consecutive Big 12 conference championship are ... less than even.

Segment 1: "The state was funding 60 percent of the cost of education, the students and families were doing 40 percent. We've now seen an inversion of those ratios," according to KU chancellor.

More than 700,000 working-age adults in Kansas are operating in the labor force with no relevant postsecondary credentials, while the demand for highly skilled workers continues to rise. The Chancellor Doug Girod spoke to what universities, government and businesses can do to produce the workforce the future Kansas City metro will need.

Segment 1: A KU sociology professor discovers a manifesto by George Orwell.  

A new book by David Smith, in collaboration with an artist, reveals there's more to Orwell than 1984. Much of the book is devoted to a manifesto Orwell wrote three years before that celebrated novel. It called for an international organization to prevent "psychological warfare." 

Segment 1: The finale of My Fellow Kansans.

This election season was a doozy in Kansas. So we look back with one last episode of My Fellow Kansans, exploring the outcome of the governor's race and putting it in context.

Segment 2, beginning at 21:25: The marching band experience.

Marching bands keep spectator spirits high. But there's more to it than the music. KCUR intern Sofia Gillespie brings us this story.

University of Kansas

In their quest to understand how bacteria like E. coli and salmonella become antibiotic resistant, researchers at the University of Kansas have made a discovery that may hold important implications for future treatments.

It turns out the types of proteins that help shield some bacteria cells from antibiotics may have evolved independently rather than from a common ancestor, as has been commonly thought. And that discovery may lead to a more refined approach to the growing problem of antibiotic resistance.

KCUR

If a blue wave sweeps across America and ousts Republicans from control of the U.S. House, Democrats probably must first win the 3rd Congressional District that sits mostly in Johnson and Wyandotte Counties.

In the six-way Democratic primary, one question stands out: Who can beat a possibly vulnerable U.S. Rep. Kevin Yoder in November?

“Any Republican in a district that Hillary Clinton won in this environment needs to be watching their back,” said University of Kansas political science professor Patrick Miller.

Segment 1: The latest on the resignation of Missouri governor Eric Greitens.

Misouri governor Eric Greitens has been at the center of a whirlwind of scandals, which culminated in his resignation yesterday. Catch up on what's going on.

Segment 2, beginning at 6:42: How to combat fake news.

The University of Kansas fired its athletic director on Monday.

Sheahon Zenger has led KU’s athletic department since 2011. In a letter to the KU community, Chancellor Douglas Girod said KU athletics has failed to make progress in “key areas."

Segment 1: From Abilene to KC: The history of Sprint.

It's a multi-billion dollar company with thousands of local employees. But did you know that Sprint got its start in Abilene, Kansas? Over a century ago, a farmer-turned-businessman started stringing lines through town and bought up local independent telephone companies. Hear how the company grew from there.

Segment 1: The ancient civilization that once thrived in Kansas.

About a year ago, a researcher at Wichita State University found the city of Etzanoa, an indigenous settlement that once thrived in Kansas. Limited tours for the public are just now getting started, but accessing the site can be hard: there's a modern city on top of the ancient one.

Phil Roeder / Wikimedia Commons

The underground economy of amateur college sports — where agents, boosters, and other deal-makers pay to play — has long been an open secret, to coaches, student-athletes and even fans. But now that someone — specifically, the Justice Department — is making a federal case of it, could a real cleanup be on the way? Commentator Victor Wishna explains in this month’s edition of “A Fan’s Notes.”

Segment 1: How long does it take to make a friend?

According to a KU professor, it takes 50 hours to make a casual friend (though that's not always guaranteed). We take a closer look into his research, including the online quiz he created to determine the closeness of a friendship.

Grit

Apr 11, 2018

Do you have grit? Does your kid have grit? "Grit" has become a buzzword in education and child development circles. But a KU professor thinks that it might be leaving some people out, especially in the classroom. A look at the value — and limits — of grit.

 

 

What a "Defend Our Flag" rally brought out about the identity and vulnerability of Lawrence.

On Saturday, February 3, a "Defend Our Flag" rally hit the streets of downtown Lawrence, with people marching down Mass Street with American flags, Confederate flags, Thin Blue Line flags and more. We'll talk about what happened that day, and why it affected Lawrence residents so profoundly.

Max Braun / Google Images -- CC

In 1907, Pablo Picasso stumbled into an art gallery in Paris. It was filled with masks and small sculptures from Africa and Oceania. Inspired, his own style began to change. That raises some interesting questions about who gets credit ... and where to draw the line between admiration, inspiration and theft.

Then: a KU researcher says that a lot of anti-abortion legislation is based on anecdotal evidence.

Guests:

Public Domain / Pixabay-CC

Alternative newspapers offer a unique perspective on the news, events and culture of a city. But how are they handling an era where print media struggles? Today, we look at the role alt-weeklies/monthlies play both here in Kansas City and across the nation. 

Then, we learn how small adjustments to neighborhood parks in Wyandotte have made a big impact on the community surrounding it.

Guests:

Allan Warren / Wikimedia Commons

Today, we speak with a University of Kansas student who won an international competition focused on designing a spacecraft capable of reaching Mars and returning to Earth.

Then: James Baldwin's legacy still resonates with today's thinkers on race in Kansas City. We discuss how his ideas still relate with the current social climate.

Guests:

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